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Thread: Burning Matches

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    Senior Member Kadowaki's Avatar
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    Burning Matches

    I realize that there are many factors involved, but are there any general guidelines as to how long can someone go once they go past their lactate threshold?
    I realize this involves complex issues of environment, pacing, speed, but are there any hints as to parameters once a rider starts into the red zone?
    An example woud be at the end of a crit, setting up for the finish how long can I expect to be able to push once I'm anaerobic?

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    Isaias NoRacer's Avatar
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    IIRC, at VO2Max about 5-6 minutes; above VO2Max, depends on the amount of force you're producing--the more force the lower the time. The time can be influenced by your tolerance for pain and fatigue and by your motivation.
    Last edited by NoRacer; 02-12-07 at 01:24 PM.
    2009 mileage = 14,738 miles; 2010 mileage = 15,234 miles; 2011 mileage = 17,344 miles; 2012 mileage = 11,414 miles; 2013 = 12,169

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    Isaias NoRacer's Avatar
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    If you are training with power, you can use the following information to determine how many matches you have and how hot you can burn them at before you run out:

    http://www.cyclingpeakssoftware.com/power411/match.asp
    Last edited by NoRacer; 02-12-07 at 01:23 PM.
    2009 mileage = 14,738 miles; 2010 mileage = 15,234 miles; 2011 mileage = 17,344 miles; 2012 mileage = 11,414 miles; 2013 = 12,169

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    Senior Member Kadowaki's Avatar
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    Thanks NoRacer,
    that's a cool link, I have that book and that software but never found this info.
    your IIRC info is also useful.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kadowaki
    I realize that there are many factors involved, but are there any general guidelines as to how long can someone go once they go past their lactate threshold?
    I realize this involves complex issues of environment, pacing, speed, but are there any hints as to parameters once a rider starts into the red zone?
    An example woud be at the end of a crit, setting up for the finish how long can I expect to be able to push once I'm anaerobic?
    There's no general rule for how long you can last above thershold, but you can get a good measure of how much work above threshold you can do. If you have access to a lab with a gas analyzer, you can gt your max O2 deficit measured which will tell you the total amount of work you can do anaerobically. Then it's just a matter of how you meter out that limited energy. Go only a little above threshold and you can last a long time; way above and your time is morel imited. You can get a reasonably good approximation by calculating your anaerobic work capacity as described in this article. http://www.velo-fit.com/articles/critical-power.pdf

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    Senior Member slim_77's Avatar
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    I asked a similar question a while back...
    Friel has a very general chart in his "bible"...from a flawed memory the quality of race-fittness is indicated by excellent, good, average, and poor. Excellent was >4-5min above LT; good, 3-4> above LT...or somewhere around there.

    As everyone else has said, however, it depends...asgelle sums it up nicely/informative article if training with power.
    gravity: it's not just a good idea, it's the law.

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