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Old 02-12-07, 12:56 PM   #1
Kadowaki
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Burning Matches

I realize that there are many factors involved, but are there any general guidelines as to how long can someone go once they go past their lactate threshold?
I realize this involves complex issues of environment, pacing, speed, but are there any hints as to parameters once a rider starts into the red zone?
An example woud be at the end of a crit, setting up for the finish how long can I expect to be able to push once I'm anaerobic?
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Old 02-12-07, 01:08 PM   #2
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IIRC, at VO2Max about 5-6 minutes; above VO2Max, depends on the amount of force you're producing--the more force the lower the time. The time can be influenced by your tolerance for pain and fatigue and by your motivation.

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Old 02-12-07, 01:13 PM   #3
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If you are training with power, you can use the following information to determine how many matches you have and how hot you can burn them at before you run out:

http://www.cyclingpeakssoftware.com/power411/match.asp

Last edited by NoRacer; 02-12-07 at 01:23 PM.
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Old 02-12-07, 02:42 PM   #4
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Thanks NoRacer,
that's a cool link, I have that book and that software but never found this info.
your IIRC info is also useful.
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Old 02-12-07, 04:40 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kadowaki
I realize that there are many factors involved, but are there any general guidelines as to how long can someone go once they go past their lactate threshold?
I realize this involves complex issues of environment, pacing, speed, but are there any hints as to parameters once a rider starts into the red zone?
An example woud be at the end of a crit, setting up for the finish how long can I expect to be able to push once I'm anaerobic?
There's no general rule for how long you can last above thershold, but you can get a good measure of how much work above threshold you can do. If you have access to a lab with a gas analyzer, you can gt your max O2 deficit measured which will tell you the total amount of work you can do anaerobically. Then it's just a matter of how you meter out that limited energy. Go only a little above threshold and you can last a long time; way above and your time is morel imited. You can get a reasonably good approximation by calculating your anaerobic work capacity as described in this article. http://www.velo-fit.com/articles/critical-power.pdf
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Old 02-14-07, 11:59 AM   #6
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I asked a similar question a while back...
Friel has a very general chart in his "bible"...from a flawed memory the quality of race-fittness is indicated by excellent, good, average, and poor. Excellent was >4-5min above LT; good, 3-4> above LT...or somewhere around there.

As everyone else has said, however, it depends...asgelle sums it up nicely/informative article if training with power.
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