Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Training & Nutrition Learn how to develop a training schedule that's good for you. What should you eat and drink on your ride? Learn everything you need to know about training and nutrition here.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 02-14-07, 03:51 PM   #1
race newbie
Where's the pack?
Thread Starter
 
race newbie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Madison, WI
Bikes: '06 Scott Speedster S 20
Posts: 254
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Friel's Periodization....off a week, now what?

I was scheduled for 9 hours of training last week and 5 this week (recovery) but due to some conflicts was only able to complete 6 hours last week. I have 3 consecutive weeks of 8.5 hours upcoming and then another 5 hour recovery week, then a 7.5, 6, and 5 before my first race of the season April 15th. Should I:

1)Consider last week the recovery week and do 8.5 this week and then 3 more? (or)
2)Have another recovery week this week and stay on schedule (or)
3)Move my schedule up a week and have 2 recovery weeks before the first race?

What is most beneficial for race preparedness? Thank in advance...!
race newbie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-07, 05:18 PM   #2
BikeCoachDave
Junior Member
 
BikeCoachDave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: London, Kentucky
Bikes: Giant TCR Zero, Redline 29er SS, Giant Anthem 1
Posts: 23
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Well, you got in 2/3 of the final build week before a recovery. I always like to err on the side of recovery in situations like this, so my advice would be to stick to your schedule and do your recovery week as scheduled. The worst that can happen is you have lost 3 hours of (in all likelyhood) tempo type work, which isnt the end of the world. This will keep you on track for your build up for your event and keep you fresh and likely motivated as you head into the next build week. Water under the bridge. Dont try and bust your hump to make up a workout during your recovery week else this could turn a recovery week into a training load and you will miss your opportunity to let the body build and adapt. Hey, if you have to miss some workout time, this isnt the worst time for it. Chin up.
BikeCoachDave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-07, 05:45 PM   #3
Enthalpic
Killing Rabbits
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 5,147
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18 Post(s)
I agree with Dave, stick to the schedule.

You say conflicts interrupted your training; well sometimes conflicts add stress just like a workout would, and it needs to be considered. For example, stress at work or a fight with the significant other will reduce your ability to adapt to training and the workload would have to be adjusted accordingly (like you did).
Enthalpic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-07, 12:13 AM   #4
ratebeer
Not obese just overweight
 
ratebeer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Sonoma County, CA
Bikes: Trek 7500fx, Cervelo Soloist
Posts: 2,035
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quality is much more important than quantity.

1. USE SMALL BITS OF TIME
If you don't have time to go for an hour or three at your usual pace, then do a 20 minute interval sesssion at very high intensity. Google "Tabata intervals." The scientific truth is that high intensity training (HIT) *will* make you faster than if you stuck to your current time-centric routine as posted -- even if you only substitute a day here and there for your longer ride.

2. USE MILEAGE REQUIREMENTS AS A GUIDELINE
Again, intensity is much more important. Don't take your mileage requirement as gospel and bump up the intensity on your "active" weeks and push it down during your "rest" weeks. Listen to your body and take it down a notch when you can use a little rest. Rev it up when you feel strong. This is the best way to avoid over-training and optimize gains.

One last little bit is that active rest -- riding a moderate distance at slow to moderate pace -- is more recuperative generally than doing nothing. Also, it's fairly well established that tapering mileage and maintaining high intensity the last month after coming off a base level of mileage results in performance -- major improvements in VO2max, TT times, sometimes LT gains.

Good luck!
__________________
Joe

Veho difficilis, ago facilis
ratebeer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-07, 12:23 AM   #5
race newbie
Where's the pack?
Thread Starter
 
race newbie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Madison, WI
Bikes: '06 Scott Speedster S 20
Posts: 254
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
It's REALLY hard for me to back off for a recovery week. I get so into the rhythm I don't want to stop, so missing hours that were scheduled really bummed me out! But I also want to get the gains and know I have to rest to realize them. I've already done 4 hours this week, I think I'll do one more session on Sat and lay low then until Monday. My conflicts were work related, just not enough hours left over to fit in all the training last week. Thanks for the advice!
race newbie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-07, 12:37 AM   #6
race newbie
Where's the pack?
Thread Starter
 
race newbie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Madison, WI
Bikes: '06 Scott Speedster S 20
Posts: 254
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by ratebeer
Google "Tabata intervals." The scientific truth is that high intensity training (HIT) *will* make you faster than if you stuck to your current time-centric routine as posted -- even if you only substitute a day here and there for your longer ride
Thanks- I read this, sounds interesting. Have you had yourself measured? I had a VO2 max test in Dec and was found to be anaerobically strong, but my LT needed work so she suggested a lot of base miles in my aerobic zone (HR 153-160) to push that up. I've been getting into intervals (a bit reluctantly, they're hard!) but know I need to do this to be a better racer. I'm curious if this has worked to improve your aerobic and anaerobic systems?
race newbie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-07, 08:39 AM   #7
BikeCoachDave
Junior Member
 
BikeCoachDave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: London, Kentucky
Bikes: Giant TCR Zero, Redline 29er SS, Giant Anthem 1
Posts: 23
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Power at your L.T. is probably the single most important factor in being a strong, fast bike racer. While a high Vo2max can identify a potentially successful racer, power at your LT, and its development with training, trumps all. Develop as much power at this level as you possiby can and you will be golden.
BikeCoachDave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-07, 10:04 AM   #8
race newbie
Where's the pack?
Thread Starter
 
race newbie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Madison, WI
Bikes: '06 Scott Speedster S 20
Posts: 254
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by BikeCoachDave
Power at your L.T. is probably the single most important factor in being a strong, fast bike racer. While a high Vo2max can identify a potentially successful racer, power at your LT, and its development with training, trumps all. Develop as much power at this level as you possiby can and you will be golden.
I don't have a power meter, and it seems all the power training talks about measurement through wattage. I do have a HR monitor and cadence computer, can I utilize those tools to build my power? In Dec my LTHR was 160 at a cadence of 80. I have been training since then just below that heart rate to build my endurance and also working on a faster cadence, 90-100. I was on the cusp between average and above average in VO2 measurement. I suspect with all the base miles since then that my LT has risen. I have also been building muscle 3 times a week in the gym and can definately tell/see the difference. I have been adding in intervals, but I'm not entirely sure what/how is the best way to maximize them to help myself prepare for racing. Any help is much appreciated!
race newbie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-07, 10:09 AM   #9
timmhaan
more ape than man
 
timmhaan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: nyc
Bikes:
Posts: 8,093
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Enthalpic
I agree with Dave, stick to the schedule.

You say conflicts interrupted your training; well sometimes conflicts add stress just like a workout would, and it needs to be considered. For example, stress at work or a fight with the significant other will reduce your ability to adapt to training and the workload would have to be adjusted accordingly (like you did).
this is a very good point. sometimes i miss a ride because i need to stay late at work and i miss out on a few hours of sleep.

i used to count training hours like the OP, but then i realized that rest is an equal part of training. if one starts to overtake the other, then i try to rebalance them.
timmhaan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-07, 04:18 PM   #10
race newbie
Where's the pack?
Thread Starter
 
race newbie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Madison, WI
Bikes: '06 Scott Speedster S 20
Posts: 254
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I just read kuans thread on Intervals....since my lactate threshold HR is 160 (which says Tempo Training on my sheet) and my Zone 4 which says Interval Training is 160-164 should I be shooting only to stay in those ranges on Interval Days? My Zone 5 is 164-185, max HR 190.
race newbie is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:25 PM.