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Training & Nutrition Learn how to develop a training schedule that's good for you. What should you eat and drink on your ride? Learn everything you need to know about training and nutrition here.

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Old 02-20-07, 12:11 AM   #1
Uncle Ted
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Training Question

I started riding last September and of course noticed immediate and pretty quick improvement, but now things have slowed down. At one point i had convinced myself that I was going to try and do a few amateur races, but that seems to be way beyond my current ability. Is it reasonable to expect that if i went from pretty sedentary in September and have been training 4-8 hours a week i'd still be stuck at 17-18 mph tops over 10 mile stretches at LT, or should i think about changing my training up a bit? How long does it take usually to go from out of shape to cat 5 competition fitness? I'm 29 BTW and not overweight but probably am carrying around 5-10 pounds I could lose.
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Old 02-20-07, 12:38 AM   #2
grebletie
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If you've hit a plateau, I would mix your training up a bit. You need to hit your body with different training stimuli. Try longer intervals at threshold, like 10-30 minutes. Also try some shorter intervals at vo2 max, which should be around 3-8 minutes long. Those will help to raise your power at threshold if you've hit a plateau.

Also, if you can, I would train more hours at lower intensity, to build your aerobic engine. Barring that, and since your hours seem limited, I would recommend lots of sweet spot training (SST). Basically, cycling is an aerobic sport, and you need to develop your aerobic engine.

This article provides a rough guide on how to go about it: http://www.pezcyclingnews.com/?pg=fullstory&id=3232

Given that you are training 4-8 hours a week, you should be able to do SST and intervals and be safe from overtraining.
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Old 02-20-07, 12:39 AM   #3
UmneyDurak
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Well how long are your usual rides? In general on a weekends people usually do longer rides, three+ hours. On weekdays shorter rides, but that are higher intensity, for example one or two days of intervals.
As for how long... It really depends on a person, and your training. I think with a descent training program, about a season. There are some people who are genetic freaks, and will go through couple of levels in one season, but thats very very very rare.
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Old 02-20-07, 01:18 AM   #4
Uncle Ted
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Winter weather has kept me from being too consistent about it, but what I typically aim at is an hour tempo ride and a 6X6 interval session about 4-5 BPM over LT once a week each. I also try to fit in 2 hour long aerobic rides during the week in zone 2 and a longer zone 2 ride on the weekends of about 2 hours. I realized after getting the Friel book and a HRM in December that I had been doing sub threshhold rides pretty much all the time and was basically getting really tired, so the new program has only been going for 6-7 weeks.
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