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  1. #1
    Senior Member bruce19's Avatar
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    Eating out & dieting...possible?

    I am making a concerted effort to lose those extra 10-15 lbs that seem to have become a part of my life at age 60. Last year I started the cycling season (March-April) at 190 lbs and ended it at 183 lbs. So this year I want to start the season at 180 lbs or so. I've been faithfully going to the gym 6 days a week doing weights and spinning classes and I've been limiting my calorie intake to an average of about 2300 cals./day. I've noticed that it's really hard to stay on the calorie schedule if you eat out. It's amazing how many calories are packed into the typical restaurant meal. Anyone have any suggestions for eating our that will work with my program. BTW, any advice on my goals, cal. limits, etc. will be appreciated. Just looking for good advice.

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    Fred
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    I'm not sure if this will help but information on the government's DASH recommendations - Dietary Approach to Stopping hypertension - may give you some ideas that will help, as they discuss prepared foods - which tendto have large portions, tons of salt, and tons of calories.

    http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/hbp/dash/

  3. #3
    Eternal Cat3 Rookie branman1986's Avatar
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    When I go out and eat, I stop as soon as I'm no longer hungry and take the rest home in a doggy bag(and I'm a big guy with about a 4000 calorie diet).

    If it's a huge meal, I usually eat about half and take the rest home. I rarely get an appetizer and almost NEVER eat dessert. It saves you a fair amount of money as well. When I go out to eat with lots of other people, I definitely see a correlation between body size & those that order appetizers. Also body size & all you can eat joints.

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    My wife eat out daily. We don't diet as that doesn't work, but we are almost vegan. What we do is customize what we order from the menu. Most places are happy to work with us and add no additional charge.

    Those places that we frequent remember us and one even put our favorite custom designed pizza in their computer. We always get asked if the meal turned out correctly.

    We are sensitive to the fact that we are causing extra work and turn up early for either lunch or dinner so the burden doesn't fall during their peak rush. If we hit the rush hour we make sure we tell them we are not in a hurry.

    Also, we will split the larger meals (like at places like Outback) and add veggy sides. Sometimes we just oreder sides with an appetizer or just sides. If you eat alone, you can take it home or just leave it.

    Al

  5. #5
    campy lover.
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    i try to limit how much i eat out every week. i try to limit myself to eating out for dinner and lunch to once a week. usually i'll go out on friday night for dinner and a sunday brunch. it's hard for me to figure out how much calories, fat and sodium are packed into the food restaurants serve (unless they have nutritional info on their website). But usually it's more calories, fat and sodium than i need.

    but if i were to eat out regularly I guess I would aim at getting more salads, less dressing. maybe getting some vegetarian dishes. order smaller sizes when possible.

    my fiancee and I will cook for two days worth of dinner when we do cook. the system has been working out great.
    “(Training) doesn't get easier; you just get faster”
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  6. #6
    Eternal Cat3 Rookie branman1986's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dentalman
    my fiancee and I will cook for two days worth of dinner when we do cook. the system has been working out great.
    oh man, I've just started doing the same thing...MUCH easier. I can buy in bulk and just have to do one set of dishes for a few nights of dinner rather than dishes every night. Plus I can take leftovers to work for lunch and it saves me quite a bit of money.

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    The thing with restaurant meal is that they like to use lots of salt on a lot of the food that they serve, and salt enhances absorption of glucose in the gut. So as well as trying to avoid the deep fryer, try to avoid any sauces and alcoholic drinks. It also depends where you eat as well, if you eat at a place that also has a drive through you probably will not have much luck with your diet. Another problem is that some waiters are also salesmen and they want you to eat more, it is their job to make the restaurant money.

    When I worked at the roadhouse we were told to put salt on the chicken wings so we could sell more beer. Come to think of it we were told to add salt to almost all our food.

    Most of all remember that french fries are not a vegtable.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dentalman
    but if i were to eat out regularly I guess I would aim at getting more salads, less dressing. .
    Check out the nutrition content of salads, especially those with Iceberg lettuce. They are nutritionally almost worthless. One of the places we frequent allows the substitution of spinach for the lettuce. Otherwise, we pretty much restrict our salads to home made.

    Al

  9. #9
    Prodigal Son
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    It is difficult to eat out and diet. Even if you are organized enough to figure out all of the VISIBLE ingredients, there have been newsclips on the local news here in NYC that talk about the fact that many of the restaurants, both of the Appleby's/TGIF ilk and of the Bouley's/Babbo/Asia de Cuba ilk will often inject their meats with butter/olive oil to increase their flavor. The caloric content of "healthy" grilled foods, even at top restaurants, is often higher than you think. Even the calorie charts that are offered at the restaurants are often wrong by a significant margin. My advice is to limit eating out to 1-2x per week, and then figure in a fudge factor.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bruce19
    I am making a concerted effort to lose those extra 10-15 lbs that seem to have become a part of my life at age 60. Last year I started the cycling season (March-April) at 190 lbs and ended it at 183 lbs. So this year I want to start the season at 180 lbs or so. I've been faithfully going to the gym 6 days a week doing weights and spinning classes and I've been limiting my calorie intake to an average of about 2300 cals./day. I've noticed that it's really hard to stay on the calorie schedule if you eat out. It's amazing how many calories are packed into the typical restaurant meal. Anyone have any suggestions for eating our that will work with my program. BTW, any advice on my goals, cal. limits, etc. will be appreciated. Just looking for good advice.
    A few obvious things:

    1) Drink water, not soda, beer or wine
    2) Salads with dressing on the side and dip your fork in the dressing
    3) Salads, in general, are good
    4) Eat all the vegetables, only some of the meat

    In other words, try to pick the lower-fat entrees.
    Eric

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  11. #11
    Where's the pack? race newbie's Avatar
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    Congrats on your progress so far! Just about every dish in most restaurants adds the salt/butter factor which is hard to avoid. Many chains have nutrional info on their websites, I will often look that over if I know I'm heading there for dinner- or will sometimes go to those restaurants as I have a relative idea what to expect, obviously subject to cooks skills as to calorie/fat content. You can also just ask for a box right away and split the portion up and take it out to your car so it's not on your plate. Another thing is to order an appetizer (not the fried stuff) as a main meal, shrimp cocktail is good or dishes with vege's, usually are raw so no added fat/cals. Just watch the dips! Salads with holds on fattening toppings and dressing on the side work. I almost always do the "grilled chicken, baked potato, vege side" which is worse than if you make it at home, but sometimes you have to allow yourself a little splurge! Good luck!
    "The dictionary is the only place that success comes before work. Hard work is the price we must all pay for success." -Vince Lombardi

  12. #12
    Prodigal Son
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    Quote Originally Posted by race newbie
    ...I almost always do the "grilled chicken, baked potato, vege side" which is worse than if you make it at home, but sometimes you have to allow yourself a little splurge! Good luck!
    Although, for me personally, why go out to get this dish?....might as well stay home because it's fresh, and tastes equally good, if not better? When I go out, I make always make attempts to avoid anything deep fried or sauced with butter/creams, but I want something fun. There are too many great restaurants in NYC and in Chicago (where I lived for 12 years) to eat grilled chix, potato, steamed veggies. A little splurge, for my tastes, means indulging a little bit.

    At any rate, when eating out, just be mindful of portions, avoid the deep fried stuff, and have a little fun. Life is way too short to eat the same stuff in a nice restaurant that you can make for yourself at home.

  13. #13
    Sophomoric Member Roody's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by !!Comatoa$ted
    The thing with restaurant meal is that they like to use lots of salt on a lot of the food that they serve, and salt enhances absorption of glucose in the gut.
    I really doubt this. What are you basing this claim on?


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  14. #14
    Sophomoric Member Roody's Avatar
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    I choose my restaurants wisely. I select the ones that have food that is unique and tastes homemade. I avoid most chains because their food is often prepared at central kitchens and reheated at the local reltaurant. That means it's a lot like the frozen dinners you buy in the supermarket, IMO.

    Ethnic restaurants tend to offer more healthy choices. My favorite restaurant is a "Mediterranean" (actually Macedonian or Bosnian, I think) joint that has smaller portions of food that is obviously freshly prepared.

    Avoid cream soups, cream sauces and most salad dressings. I like oil and vinegar on the side. If they bring veg. oil instead of olive oil I never go back.

    Beware the buffet!! Most do have healthy choices, but portion size and temptation are the downfalls.


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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roody
    I choose my restaurants wisely. I select the ones that have food that is unique and tastes homemade. I avoid most chains because their food is often prepared at central kitchens and reheated at the local reltaurant. That means it's a lot like the frozen dinners you buy in the supermarket, IMO.

    Ethnic restaurants tend to offer more healthy choices. My favorite restaurant is a "Mediterranean" (actually Macedonian or Bosnian, I think) joint that has smaller portions of food that is obviously freshly prepared.

    Avoid cream soups, cream sauces and most salad dressings. I like oil and vinegar on the side. If they bring veg. oil instead of olive oil I never go back.

    Beware the buffet!! Most do have healthy choices, but portion size and temptation are the downfalls.

    We do the same. It is possible to eat natural, non processed food where you can in-fact identify the major ingredients. You don't frequent those that specialize in unhealthy foods.

    Thi and mideastern restaurants are some of my favorites. Indian is also good if you select carefully. Turkish is first class, but you have to be in a bigger city. Tibetan isn't so good, but there's only two or so in the country and Kurdish is top notch if you live in St Paul. At one time it was the only one in the country according to the owner. Afghanistan is very meat oriented and Ethiopian leaves you starving (just kidding).

    Al

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roody
    I really doubt this. What are you basing this claim on?
    Yes thanks for pointing that out, I got it backwards.

    "There is also a sodium pump at the basolateral membrane. Sodium and glucose share a common share a common carrier mechanism, so that sodium absorption is enhanced by glucose transport"

    McCance, L.M., and Huether, S.E, (2006) Pathophysiology The Biological Basis for Disease in Adults and Children (5th ed.). St-Louis: Elsevier Mosby. Page 1362

  17. #17
    Sophomoric Member Roody's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Al.canoe
    We do the same. It is possible to eat natural, non processed food where you can in-fact identify the major ingredients. You don't frequent those that specialize in unhealthy foods.

    Thi and mideastern restaurants are some of my favorites. Indian is also good if you select carefully. Turkish is first class, but you have to be in a bigger city. Tibetan isn't so good, but there's only two or so in the country and Kurdish is top notch if you live in St Paul. At one time it was the only one in the country according to the owner. Afghanistan is very meat oriented and Ethiopian leaves you starving (just kidding).


    Al
    I wish I could come to St. Paul and try some of those places with you! You're especially right about mid-eastern cuisine. I think Lebanese and Palestinian restaurants especially are very conscious about healthy eating. They seem to have always known many of the principles of nutrition that we in the US are just now "discovering." They use wholesome ingredients, small portions, healthy fats, less meat, and lots of whole grains, beans and vegetables. And they're very aware of what they're doing. One Lebanese waiter brought us a special dish "Because I can see that you appreciate good food." And by "good" he clearly meant healthy as well as delicious. Lebanese restaurants are about the only ones where I feel comfortable ordering dessert. The pastries are rich, but they're so small that the calories and sugar/fat load isn't too bad. Another idea is to have figs or dates for dessert in a mid-eastern restaurant.


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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roody
    I wish I could come to St. Paul and try some of those places with you! You're especially right about mid-eastern cuisine. I think Lebanese and Palestinian restaurants especially are very conscious about healthy eating. .
    Actually, though I've eaten in St Paul many times, I live in Panama City, Florida, the Mecca for unhealthy restaurants. I frequent Atlanta often and have traveled to wash DC and many other places in the US. When ever I'm in travelling, I check out the phone book for interesting places to eat. Here in PC, we only eat at a small, select group of restaurants.

    That Tibetan is in Bloomington Indiana by the way. It's owned/managed by the Deli Lama's nephew. I kidded him about the beef dishes as I knew they ate Yak. he said American's would not eat Yak, so he switched to beef.

    Yak I'm sure is very low in fat, tough and stringy with a wild-like taste. I've eaten range-raised beef and that's how I remeber that meat tasted. I've also eaten horse in France. Very sweet.

    We actually had a Palestinian restaurant here for a while, but they folded. I got to eat there once.

    They are not more health conscious then Americans. Their diet evolved from the necessities of availability and cost. Matter of fact, I'm sure many of the ethnic restaurants modify their food for the American taste by adding more meat and serving larger portions.

    The rural areas of third world countries like China for example, ate what they could afford, so they had little meat or milk products. Consequently they still have an order of magnitude less of the type of diseases that the affluent western countries suffer from. However, now that the third world is getting more affluent due to globalization (according to the UN), they are getting our diseases too, especially in the cities as that's where the wealth appears first.

    Al

  19. #19
    Senior Member cyclezealot's Avatar
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    when I used to run , I used to say, I run in order to eat. At least the way we used to eat. American restaurants, so overload your plate. It's redicilous. Ordering salads or going to natural food restaurants might help. Wish we did not enjoy eating out so much, i'd be a slimmer cyclist.

  20. #20
    Zoom zoom zoom zoom bonk znomit's Avatar
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    The chef cooks for the largest fattest customer. If thats you then you should eat everything on your plate, otherwise leave a little or a lot behind.

  21. #21
    Sophomoric Member Roody's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclezealot
    when I used to run , I used to say, I run in order to eat. At least the way we used to eat. American restaurants, so overload your plate. It's redicilous. Ordering salads or going to natural food restaurants might help. Wish we did not enjoy eating out so much, i'd be a slimmer cyclist.
    What about the "French Paradox"? The French eat foods rich in animal fats (cream, butter, cheese, meat) and they eat white bread and potatoes like nobody's business. They also eat out in restaurants a lot. But most of them are skinny and heart disease is lower than in many other western countries with "healthier" diets. What are the reasons for this?


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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roody
    What about the "French Paradox"? The French eat foods rich in animal fats (cream, butter, cheese, meat) and they eat white bread and potatoes like nobody's business. They also eat out in restaurants a lot. But most of them are skinny and heart disease is lower than in many other western countries with "healthier" diets. What are the reasons for this?
    Their plates aren't the size of trash can lids, and their food is high quality instead of salt-laden garbage. Plus, they walk a lot more than we do.
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  23. #23
    SSP
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    If you "clean your plate" at most America restaurants, you have "overeaten". American portion sizes (like American *sses) are "super-sized".

    One trick is to divide your plate in half as soon as you get it. Eat half, and take the rest home for the next day.
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roody
    Beware the buffet!! Most do have healthy choices, but portion size and temptation are the downfalls.
    +1

    Buffets are evil. By their very nature, they encourage gluttony (as can easily be seen by the average size of the folks that waddle into them). Just say No to Buffets!
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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roody
    I really doubt this. What are you basing this claim on?
    Here is another thing that I read today for class that seems quite interesting.

    Intestinal cells do not need insulin to absorb glucose or galactose, in order to cross the intestinal cell membrane glucose and galactose are coupled with sodium, which binds to a membrane protein, and then they are transferred together across the membrane. Then the sodium is pumped back out through a different mechanism, which requires potassium to be pumped in the opposite direction of sodium.

    Quote Originally Posted by Roody
    What about the "French Paradox"? The French eat foods rich in animal fats (cream, butter, cheese, meat) and they eat white bread and potatoes like nobody's business. They also eat out in restaurants a lot. But most of them are skinny and heart disease is lower than in many other western countries with "healthier" diets. What are the reasons for this?

    I wonder how many calories they consume in a day?

    I have also heard that the Europeans make a bigger deal out of meals, and that they are not eaten on the run. People take the time to sit down and take their time to eat a good meal, and not pick it up at a window so they can eat it during the traffic jam on the way to work.
    Last edited by !!Comatoa$ted; 02-26-07 at 06:02 PM.

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