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  1. #1
    Seek the Joy
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    Developing a more agressive possistion

    What stretches and excersises would allow me to develop a more agressive and aerodynamic position? Excercise requiring a minimum of equipment are prefered

  2. #2
    Senior Member DannoXYZ's Avatar
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    you want to do passive stretches for flexibility:

    side-splits: sit on ground, spread your legs out as far as possible with knees straight. Gradually scoot your butt forward to spread the split. Then keeping the back straight and flat, rock the pelvis forward so you can place your elbows on the ground. Gradually walk the elbows forward until you can put your chest on the ground. Front-splits don't seem to be as effective for flexibility on the bike.

    calves: stand facing a wall and put one leg back. Keep heel of back leg flat on the ground and gradually lower yourself. Keep back leg straight to stretch gastrocnemius, bend knees to stretch soleus muscle. Extra stretch can be done with front-leg on a chair.

    hamstrings: sit on ground with both legs straight and together in front of you. Keeping back straight and flat, bend at pelvis and walk your hands on top of your legs until you can reach your toes. Continue past until you can place your chin on your knee with straight back, elbows on either side of your knees, forearms flat on the ground, parallel to your lower leg. You can also do this with one leg forward and one bent back by your butt.

    quadriceps: sit on ground, pull one leg back and place foot next to your butt, toes aimed back. Gradually with straight and flat back, lean back. Use arms to brace yourself at lowest point you can go and hold. With time and increased flexibility, you can do both legs at once and lay all the way back.


    These are the main ones for cycling. There are others you can do for the back and shoulders as well. Hold all stretches 20-40 seconds. Do these after a 10-15 minute warm-up and immediately after a ride. Don't bounce. I'd also recommend building up the lower back-muscles on the roman-chair to better match the leg-muscles.


    These stretches will allow you be comfortable and efficient in a low position in the drops with bent elbows and flat straight back.



    Last edited by DannoXYZ; 03-20-07 at 03:06 PM.

  3. #3
    Pokes On Spokes JPradun's Avatar
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    DannoXYZ

    You're also genetically more flexible than most people, so most will never reach your level. But great stretch ideas.

  4. #4
    Senior Member DannoXYZ's Avatar
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    Yeah, most of my flexibility came from being a jock in my teenage years. The soft ends of the bones harden and ligaments tighten in the teenage years and if you stay flexible with stretches and athletics during those years, you can carry on the flexibility into your adult years.

    However, as adults, you still can make great progress. About 20-30 minutes of stretching should be incorporated into every workout, it really helps in improving strength & fitness and recovery.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Richard Cranium's Avatar
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    What stretches and excersises would allow me to develop a more agressive and aerodynamic position? Excercise requiring a minimum of equipment are prefered
    Simply "practice" good form while riding in an unstressed manner. Too often, riders simply "try all the time" and keep themselves from relaxing into a better position.

    If you are sure that your normal position is less than favorable for high speeds, then attempt to "rehearse" a good aero position by exaggerating your lean. After several sessions of "ultra-aero" riding, you'll find a better "everyday" position.

    However, the "gotcha" is in knowing whether your bike setup is actually "right" for what you want to do.

    Good luck with that......

  6. #6
    Senior Member rule's Avatar
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    Yoga

  7. #7
    Recumbent Ninja
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    Get a video called "Dyamic Mobility" by Eric Cressey - it'll have all you could ever need.

  8. #8
    Isaias NoRacer's Avatar
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    Not having a gut helps too.
    2009 mileage = 14,738 miles; 2010 mileage = 15,234 miles; 2011 mileage = 17,344 miles; 2012 mileage = 11,414 miles; 2013 = 12,169

  9. #9
    so whatcha' want? bigskymacadam's Avatar
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    core training, too. superman's on a roman chair, situps, leg lifts .... strong, centered core to keep you in your chosen position.

  10. #10
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    I maybe sound a bit snotty but why not just ride ? I may have quite a high pain threshold for backpain but some pain when getting used to a new riding position should be tolerated IMO.
    I am 50 and commuting on a way too small road bike(55 cc, I am 6', 140 mm stem to make it rideable) .It is a great way to get used to a low aero position.

  11. #11
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    Stretching is #1 to to be comfortable and aerodynamic on a road bike. However, one needs to work on attaining a strong body core to maintain that position comfortably. I stretch every night, and do yoga and ab exercises 2 or 3 times a week. I watch an hour of TV every night before bed--I find it's a good time to get out of the chair and onto the mat.This is the voice of experience. My back used to flip out on me twice a year, but now I'm always pain free.

  12. #12
    Not obese just overweight ratebeer's Avatar
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    * losing weight
    * stretching (yoga)
    * making progressive equipment changes (removing one or half spacer from the headset at a time)
    * analyzing pictures or video of yourself
    Joe

    Veho difficilis, ago facilis

  13. #13
    Seek the Joy
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    haha seeing as im 6 foot 1 145 pounds i dont think that the loosing weight thing is realy an option, i guess im just inflexable, ill try those stretches though, and work on my core.

  14. #14
    Senior Member AnthonyG's Avatar
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    OK, here's an alternative point of view. Being able to adopt an agressive riding position has just as much to do with the bike setup as anything. I'm a SERIOUS weakling when it comes to hand and shoulder strength and I wouldn't call myself paticuarly flexible yet I can now adopt an agressive/aero riding position without too much effort because my bike is now setup properly. The key to being able to adopt an aero position is to have cranks that aren't too long and the saddle back far enough in relation to the bottom bracket that you don't have too much weight on your hands/shoulders.

    A bit of strength and flexibility can sure make up for a poor riding position but getting the riding position right in the first place makes it even easier.

    Regards, Anthony

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