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Old 05-23-07, 12:10 PM   #1
HardyWeinberg
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running

I went running last week for the 1st time in ~15 yrs. Tried to pick up where I left off (ha!) and had substantial back complaints about halfway through. Not crippling fall on the ground spasms, but I was inspired to sit on a bench that was right there when it started. I walked back to the hotel fine (but slowly). I was on a 3 day business trip, so no biking, thought running could help w/ all the desserts they were feeding us. Anyway, I got a reasonable run in before my body shut me down, so I guess it wasn't a complete failure.

Monday I went running again, w/ shorter defined endpoint, did 3-4 miles in 25 min. I wonder if that was pushing too hard, but that's just about my pace. Is that a bad thing, or should I try to slow my pace? Anyway, no real after effects, just typical feelings of rediscovering long lost muscles.

I am biking shorter miles lately, schedule just isn't letting me add on to my commute like I had been in March and April. Had been pushing 200 miles/wk, now back down to double digits.

I am hoping to start running 1-2x/wk so that I can gain/maintain a (low) level of running ability to let me do some kind of exercise during business (and vacation) travel w/o my bike. But I really don't want to injure myself. I guess just try to feel for unusual sensations, and then stop whatever causes them? Is that the basic idea?

You hear cross-training is a good idea, I'd like to convince my back and thighs of that (it's the back I don't want to anger, the thighs seem like they can be reasoned with).
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Old 05-23-07, 12:22 PM   #2
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I am a distance runner who has turned into a 3 sport guy. I used to run over 35 miles a week. Now I just run 2-3 times a week, 3-8 miles per. And I swim and cycle. Anyhow, I am much more comfortable giving advice on running than cycling.

I tell anyone who asks (I never push my advice on anyone without being asked) that running can be a great form of exercise and it can be so much more. It is my time to think, relax, regroup, etc. I think it can be done largely with a minimum of pain and injury, if you focus on form and correct bad habits.

That all said, I also tell them this . . . if you have never run before or have not run in years . . . it SUCKS. It hurts, feels awkward, and is no fun. There is really no way around this. For some this goes away fast, for others (me) it really takes a little while. I started to run with the goal of a half marathon here in Indy. If I had not had that goal, I would not have stuck with it. Somewhere over the 3 months I found I liked it. A few months later, I found that I loved it.

You back and thighs will hurt, not much you can do. Start with reasonable goals and work your way up. I will save you the long post on form . . . but here is my nutshell:
#1 do NOT assume because we all learn to run when we are 3 and that it is a natural motion that we are doing it right. People get coaching in every friggin activity in the world, but not running.
#2 focus on getting to a cadence of 90 steps per minute (with each foot). If you are well below that, your stride is way too long and that causes a great deal of pain. You are putting your foot in front of your COG and you are braking every step, and that impact goes right up your leg. You want to have a fast turnover, landing mid foot with your foot under your body.

Enjoy. I found that running makes me love cycling and swimming more. And cycling makes me love running and swimming more. And swimming makes me . . . you get the point. Mixing it up is a great thing.
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Old 05-23-07, 12:40 PM   #3
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I want to jump in here in case IndyGreg or any others can give more advice. My whole body hurts when I run. Heck, I don't run, I jog. Whenever I get motivated to run, I get shin splints right away. I deal with that for a few days -- not a big deal really. But it's how my stomach, chest, and shoulders ache!!! Ironically, my legs are fine. But running more than 10 - 15 minutes just does me in!

Quote:
That all said, I also tell them this . . . if you have never run before or have not run in years . . . it SUCKS. It hurts, feels awkward, and is no fun. There is really no way around this. For some this goes away fast, for others (me) it really takes a little while.
Maybe this is what Greg is referring to, and I should just suck it up and keep trying?
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Old 05-23-07, 12:57 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by etothepii
I want to jump in here in case IndyGreg or any others can give more advice. My whole body hurts when I run. Heck, I don't run, I jog. Whenever I get motivated to run, I get shin splints right away. I deal with that for a few days -- not a big deal really. But it's how my stomach, chest, and shoulders ache!!! Ironically, my legs are fine. But running more than 10 - 15 minutes just does me in!



Maybe this is what Greg is referring to, and I should just suck it up and keep trying?
Yes. Just keep trying, but shoot for smaller incremental goals. At some point it'll hurt less for the same pace and distance. Once you've reached that point, increase the workload if you wish.
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Old 05-23-07, 01:28 PM   #5
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most newbies say they get shin splints. More than likely they are just having pains in their shins . . . shin splints come from more mileage and bad form . . . and they are much worse than the pain newbies are feeling. They can lead to bruising and eventually a stress fracture.
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Old 05-27-07, 10:59 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HardyWeinberg
I went running last week for the 1st time in ~15 yrs. Tried to pick up where I left off (ha!) and had substantial back complaints about halfway through. Not crippling fall on the ground spasms, but I was inspired to sit on a bench that was right there when it started. I walked back to the hotel fine (but slowly). I was on a 3 day business trip, so no biking, thought running could help w/ all the desserts they were feeding us. Anyway, I got a reasonable run in before my body shut me down, so I guess it wasn't a complete failure.

Monday I went running again, w/ shorter defined endpoint, did 3-4 miles in 25 min. I wonder if that was pushing too hard, but that's just about my pace. Is that a bad thing, or should I try to slow my pace? Anyway, no real after effects, just typical feelings of rediscovering long lost muscles.

I am biking shorter miles lately, schedule just isn't letting me add on to my commute like I had been in March and April. Had been pushing 200 miles/wk, now back down to double digits.

I am hoping to start running 1-2x/wk so that I can gain/maintain a (low) level of running ability to let me do some kind of exercise during business (and vacation) travel w/o my bike. But I really don't want to injure myself. I guess just try to feel for unusual sensations, and then stop whatever causes them? Is that the basic idea?

You hear cross-training is a good idea, I'd like to convince my back and thighs of that (it's the back I don't want to anger, the thighs seem like they can be reasoned with).
Sounds like you might have been a little too enthusiastic on your first couple runs - I'm guilty of that too, whenever I start running again after a layoff. What I do, if I'm itching for miles but don't have the time in yet, is do a run/walk thing. After a week of alternating walking and running for a couple miles, my body has adjusted itself to running, and can take more punishment.

As for the back issues, have you always had a back problem, or is this something that only happens when you run? Strengthening the muscles that support your back might help, as well as taking a look at your running shoes. Sometimes shoes with too much cushioning can raise up your heel too high and cause to compensate your forward lean with pressure on your lower back. In addition, running posture is important. Resist the urge to look at your feet when you run (guilty, again) and try to imagine that your pelvis is a cup of liquid that you don't want to spill over - this way you'll keep your torso straight. As always, stay relaxed, breath out when your left food hits the ground and keep your arms loose.

Good luck and keep it up!

~M
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Old 05-27-07, 12:23 PM   #7
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shin splints also come from poor fitting shoes. if you want to run you need a pair of shoes that fit your running style. so get to a running specific shoe store and get some real advice on what shoes you need.

like the rest have said, you have to ease back into running. you dont just decide to run and knock out 3 or 5 miles your first time and feel great afterwards. good luck. later.
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