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Old 08-03-07, 12:33 PM   #1
Rotten Bastard
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Article about dehydration

Some food for thought.

#####

You're Not Demented, Just Dehydrated

http://www.wie.org/j33/dehydrated.asp

There were no interstates at the time. Back in the 1940s, Route 66 was the best way to California. My folks had just bought a new tan English Ford, with a crank handle that you stuck into the front of the engine and turned to start the vehicle. I donít know why they wanted to drive it from New York to the hot deserts of the American Southwest.

When a lone gas station owner urged Dad not to drive across the desert without strapping four canvas water bags onto the bumper, he listened. The old man told Dad, ďYou know, it gets up to 140 degrees in the shade at noon. Now, if you break down, youíre gonna get real thirsty. Soon, nausea comes on and youíre feeling real sick. When youíve lost ten percent of your bodyís water, you feel sort of giddy. Then your tongue swells up like it donít belong in your mouth. Now, you canít close your eyelids as the corners of your eyes dry up. Your skin turns blue. Then come the hallucinations. You see, you go crazy before you die.Ē

Dad bought the water bags, and I suddenly became aware of how quickly life can dry up and blow away.

You donít need to be stranded in a desert to feel the effects of dehydration. Almost all the people you see and meet on a daily basis are dehydrated. How many folks complain of a lack of energy? Itís the number one complaint in America. Insufficient energy is the first sign that the blood, tissues, and organs are not getting enough water, and your liver and brain are the least tolerant of a lack of water.

This has led some medical researchers to conclude that Alzheimerís disease is simply the result of long-term dehydration of the brain. The same loss of brain function that causes a lost and thirsty person to eat sand believing it to be water causes your wife, husband, mother, or father not to recognize you any longer. They are not demented, only thirsty.

When you were born (depending on the drugs in your motherís body), you were ninety percent water. As you become an adult, the hydration level begins to drop; it can drop to as low as sixty-five percent in men and fifty-two percent in women. However, if hydration levels drop just five percent more, death occurs.

Both water intake and thirst sensation decline with age, and so does mental function. When your pituitary gland begins to dry up, vasopressin, a hormone it secretes, is likewise handicapped. Vaso refers to the blood vessels, and pressin refers to constriction or pressing. Vasopressin regulates the flow of water to the cells and intracellular spaces in your body. When this hormone reaches a cell membrane, it presses water through a filtration receptor so that only water reaches and hydrates the cell. This is crucial because vital organs begin to fail without proper hydration.

Consider this: when you take a coffee break, that ingested caffeine limits the secretion of vasopressin and keeps it from circulating. Thus, even though you are getting plenty of water with the coffee, your cells are dehydrating. Alcohol has the same effect, which is why drinkers are incredibly thirsty in the morning after a bout of heavy drinking.

Bear in mind that the five quarts of blood coursing through your body are ninety percent water, and the rest of your body holds between fifty and eighty quarts of water. Your brain and nerve tissues are eighty percent water or more.

Every time you move any body part, even a finger or toe, water is required. Thatís why dehydrated people have so many aches and pains. Itís also why people look so old; their dehydrated organs steal the water from their skin in order to function. Remember, under ordinary circumstances, you expel up to a gallon of water every twenty-four hours. What do you think happens when you donít replenish that supply? Your body experiences a drought condition!

A mere two percent drop in hydration will make your short-term memory so fuzzy that youíll be unable to remember your friendsí names, have trouble doing basic math, and forget where you put your keys. Since seventy-five percent of Americans are chronically dehydrated, itís no wonder people are losing their minds.

Yet, the solution is so simple: cool, clean water. Drink eight to ten eight-ounce glasses a day of pure distilled water, and youíll be amazed at how many ailments disappear. Donít worry; youíre not dementedójust dehydrated!
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Old 08-03-07, 04:51 PM   #2
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Nifty. Do they cite any of the research they allude to? I'd love to read some of the studies done on this.

Thanks for the find!
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Old 08-03-07, 06:16 PM   #3
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I still like a cold beer after a ride.
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Old 08-03-07, 09:26 PM   #4
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Nifty. Do they cite any of the research they allude to? I'd love to read some of the studies done on this.

Thanks for the find!
Not sure if that particular writer cited any, but I think I remember seeing some stuff about the general subject elsewhere. I'll get back to you if I find it!
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Old 08-04-07, 06:40 AM   #5
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Interesting read, though, author's credentials are suspect.

Yep, I'm dehydrated alright!
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Old 08-04-07, 07:31 AM   #6
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http://alzheimers-disease.suite101.c...ersus_dementia

"Alzheimer's Versus Dementia
Differences, Causes and Explanation of These Illnesses
© Cyrus Dehkan

Apr 19, 2007

Many people assume that dementia means Alzheimer's. In reality they are two different entities. Their differences and causes are explored.
Alzheimer’s and Dementia are different entities, according to the Alzheimer’s Foundation and numerous experts on the subject. Very simply, dementia is a symptom. There are numerous diseases that can cause this. Alzheimer’s is a disease entity that can cause dementia. We will discuss both in more depth below.

Forgetful
Dementia is the decrease in intellectual capacity. These include a decrease in reasoning, remembering, altered moods and, behavior changes. The Alzheimer’s foundation states that this loss in mental capacity is due to essentially a deterioration and destruction of brain cells either from vascular deficiencies or other causes. There are many different disease states that fall under the classification of dementia and many are curable. A thorough diagnosis by a physician will be needed to distinguish and determine which disease state is present. Several diseases that fall under dementia include Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s disease and Huntington’s disease, as examples. Non- disease states, such as dehydration can also cause similar symptoms."

According to Ryan's new book, you need up to almost 4 liters per day of fluids when not exercising.

Al
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Old 08-04-07, 09:54 PM   #7
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a very interesting read... though it's been said that 8-10 glasses of water per day is actually too much for the average adult, and that too much water can actually be bad for you:

http://www.snopes.com/medical/myths/8glasses.asp

I'd love to see references for any of the research that was done on this, too!
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Old 08-04-07, 09:59 PM   #8
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Here's the other thread I was thinking of:
This Just In: Water Is Now Bad For You

and I believe that this is the article that Machka was talking about in that thread:
http://www.ultracycling.com/nutritio...natremia2.html
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Old 08-05-07, 05:51 AM   #9
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a very interesting read... though it's been said that 8-10 glasses of water per day is actually too much for the average adult, and that too much water can actually be bad for you:

http://www.snopes.com/medical/myths/8glasses.asp

I'd love to see references for any of the research that was done on this, too!
It's not a myth for either me or my adult daughter. Both of us in the past year have had occasions when more senior medical tech's were unable to draw blood from our veins, yet we both work diligently at hydration as we are very physically active and we both do a lot of reading on fitness and nutrition. We both had to come back at a later time after super-hydrating. I know personally I need to be at least at the upper end of Ryan's recommended range.

I bet the majority of the couch potatoes are un-hydrated as well. And, those folks who are on a relatively higher-fiber diet need even more fluids than average.

There are likely many variables that affect the individuals need for fluid. I would argue those of us in the south east are on the high end of "need". My daughter lives in the Atlanta area and I'm on the Gulf Coast most of the time.

Al
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Old 08-05-07, 03:45 PM   #10
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Some food for thought.
So, I drink a lot of water.

And I have a father who has alzheimer's disease, so the subject is of considerable interest to me.

Alzheimer's is not about dehydration - it happens because of accumulation of "plaques" between nerve cells. There are various theories about why this happens, and the most popular one is that the processes that are responsible for preventing the accumulation break down somehow.

There are things that are correlated with not getting alzheimers - regular exercise, and regular mental activity both show up. I'm not aware of any that say anything about dehydration.

So, basically, I think this is at best, pseudo-science.
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Old 08-06-07, 07:25 PM   #11
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Eric,

I'm sorry to hear about your father. I'll send positive thoughts his way.

It's always good to hear a point/counterpoint to information that's out there. It's what makes these boards great.

RB
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