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Old 10-21-07, 12:12 PM   #1
teacher
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What kind of tires do I need for a trainer?

I have a cyclocross bike that is my commuter. I am planning on getting new tires for it.... I also plan to use it on a trainer.

My preference is to get tires that are good for commuting that I can also use on a trainer. Would something like the schwalbe marathon plus work on a trainer or is there too much tread on that?

Or do I need two sets of tires?
All suggestions are appreciated!
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Old 10-21-07, 12:51 PM   #2
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My Michelin Krylions worked OK. Previously, I had an MTB on the trainer with mountain bike slicks, and the rubber would melt and stick to the roller. But the Michelin road bike tires at 110 or 120 psi haven't had any abnormal wear. The Michelins are smooth, no tread at all.
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Old 10-21-07, 12:54 PM   #3
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Hi,
you need smooth. I also wouldn't want to use a nice tire on a trainer.
If you have an old wheel, get the cheapest tire (like Walmart or a $10 tire from a bike shop) and put it on. You might call around looking for an old rear wheel you could buy or borrow for the winter.

Then use it for the trainer, and switch when you ride.
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Old 10-21-07, 01:12 PM   #4
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I ride my Conti 1000s inside and outside.
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Old 10-21-07, 01:46 PM   #5
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Hi,
you need smooth. I also wouldn't want to use a nice tire on a trainer.
If you have an old wheel, get the cheapest tire (like Walmart or a $10 tire from a bike shop) and put it on. You might call around looking for an old rear wheel you could buy or borrow for the winter.

Then use it for the trainer, and switch when you ride.
I have an old road bike can I use that rear tire?
(My cyclocross has 20 gears, my road bike only 14)
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Old 10-21-07, 01:57 PM   #6
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Get the cheapest, lousiest, smoothest tires you can because the trainer will wreck them. I am using my Specialized "Mondo" tires that came stock on my Allez for trainer duty and they are just fine in that setting.
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Old 10-21-07, 02:02 PM   #7
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I have an old road bike can I use that rear tire?
(My cyclocross has 20 gears, my road bike only 14)
If you mean just dropping the roadie's wheels onto your cyclocross bike, the answer is no. You won't be able to get a 10-speed chain onto a 7-speed cassette. So unless you pull the tire off the wheel and put it onto your cyclocross bike's wheels and swap tires back and forth you won't be able to do what you're looking to do.

Honestly, if you have an old road bike, unless the fit is terrible or something, you might as well use the road bike on the trainer, and keep your cyclocross bike for outdoors only. Less hassle switching wheels, you can just leave the road bike locked into the trainer. You can get the same workout on your trainer just by choosing the right gearing and changing the resistance on the trainer, regardless of the bike quality.
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Old 10-21-07, 02:06 PM   #8
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Get the cheapest, lousiest, smoothest tires you can because the trainer will wreck them.

I have never had a trainer wreck my tires, nor have I ever figured out how one would. It's no different than riding on pavement. If anything a trainer is easier on tires than pavement is.
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Old 10-21-07, 02:06 PM   #9
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If you mean just dropping the roadie's wheels onto your cyclocross bike, the answer is no. You won't be able to get a 10-speed chain onto a 7-speed cassette. So unless you pull the tire off the wheel and put it onto your cyclocross bike's wheels and swap tires back and forth you won't be able to do what you're looking to do.
That's what I thought, thanks!
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Old 10-21-07, 03:11 PM   #10
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I have never had a trainer wreck my tires, nor have I ever figured out how one would. It's no different than riding on pavement. If anything a trainer is easier on tires than pavement is.
I agree - a trainer should be easier on a tire than pavement, but that's not been my experience. Maybe the difference is that you are running better tires than I am? I get a flat, shiny strip down the center of the tire where it contacts the roller. My drum is supposedly not pressing too hard on the tire (per the manual). I have seen this kind of wear on several different tires but I have not tried using better quality tires on the trainer because I was afraid to put them on after seeing the wear from a winter on the machine.
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Old 10-21-07, 03:23 PM   #11
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I agree - a trainer should be easier on a tire than pavement, but that's not been my experience. Maybe the difference is that you are running better tires than I am? I get a flat, shiny strip down the center of the tire where it contacts the roller. My drum is supposedly not pressing too hard on the tire (per the manual). I have seen this kind of wear on several different tires but I have not tried using better quality tires on the trainer because I was afraid to put them on after seeing the wear from a winter on the machine.
I ride fairly heavy duty tires (the Conti 1000s). I get a bit of that shiny strip down the middle, but that doesn't mean my tires are damaged. I've had the same tires on my trainer bicycle for 3 winters in a row, and they are still fine.
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Old 10-22-07, 03:17 PM   #12
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Try Michellin Dynamics.
Smooth center
Very cheap
Old school formula for long-life and flat protection: thick rubber
Ride comfortably
Not as slow as they are cheap
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Old 10-23-07, 08:46 PM   #13
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As far as I can tell, the only way your tires could get wrecked on a trainer is if

1) the tire slips against the roller

and

2) the roller is not smooth

When on my trainer, I keep my rear tire under inflated a bit to be sure I have good contact with the roller and I rarely, if ever, cause the rear wheel to slip.
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Old 10-23-07, 11:22 PM   #14
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If you have an older spare rear wheel, Continental makes a dedicated trainer tire called the Continental Ultra Sport Hometrainer LINK. Claims quieter, lasts longer. I`d use up old tires first, however.
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Old 10-25-07, 05:13 PM   #15
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I use the conti hometrainer tire and it also gets the shiny strip which slips eventually
the tires need to be cleaned with a scrubber sponge, any dust will cause the shiny strip

if using regular tires, the harder the tire the longer it will last
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Old 10-27-07, 08:44 AM   #16
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Quote:
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I ride fairly heavy duty tires (the Conti 1000s). I get a bit of that shiny strip down the middle, but that doesn't mean my tires are damaged. I've had the same tires on my trainer bicycle for 3 winters in a row, and they are still fine.
Do you also use this tires outside or just solely for indoor training?
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