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Training & Nutrition Learn how to develop a training schedule that's good for you. What should you eat and drink on your ride? Learn everything you need to know about training and nutrition here.

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Old 11-08-07, 07:38 PM   #1
rockchukkar
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Type II Diabetic Finally Getting Control of Blood Sugars Eating Lots of Carbohydrates

I am a type II diabetic. I've been one for at least 3 years now. I've been trying to control my blood sugars by eating a low carbohydrate diet. I found that I was not getting as good of control doing this as I thought I would.

I switched to a vegan diet and have been surprised at how well my blood sugars have been controlled. I purchased a book by Neal Barnard M.D. Yes, I know he is a member of PETA and PCRM. I don't care. It is working for me.

http://www.nealbarnard.org/pdfs/Diabetes-Care.pdf

My fasting blood sugar in the morning is now 85-90. I ate a bowel of oatmeal with cinnamon and crasins and a piece of multigrain toast without butter and my 2 hour post-prandial sugar this morning was 98! I had a bean burrito, refried beans, rice and enchillada sauce for lunch and my 2 hour post prandial was 138! By four hours after lunch my sugar was back down to 95. I had two hummus, cucumber, tomato and onion sandwiches for supper and my 2 hour post-prandial sugar was 121! I had a few wasabi peas and some almonds for a snack and I'll have a piece of fruit later.

If you are interested in really getting control of your sugars and are serious about make a dietary lifestyle change check this out.
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Old 11-09-07, 07:59 AM   #2
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well, if diet and biking alone works, fine. that is the way to do it if your body lets you.

*if you get to the point where you can't control it, and someone suggests pills,
just man up, skip the pills (they will make you feel like crap trust me)
get straight on insulin. the needles do not hurt, and there are no harmful effects
from using it, (unlike the type 2 pills)...except watch how much
you inject and of course have glucose tabs stashed everywhere
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Old 11-09-07, 08:55 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by rockchukkar View Post
I am a type II diabetic. I've been one for at least 3 years now. I've been trying to control my blood sugars by eating a low carbohydrate diet. I found that I was not getting as good of control doing this as I thought I would.

I switched to a vegan diet and have been surprised at how well my blood sugars have been controlled. I purchased a book by Neal Barnard M.D. Yes, I know he is a member of PETA and PCRM. I don't care. It is working for me.
A minor point, a Vegan diet is mostly carbs. There are good carbs and lots of bad carbs. An athlete is highly dependent on carbs. Also, how carbs are prepared sometimes has a big impact. For example, less cooked or firm pasta (Al dente) has a much lower glycemic index than the over-cooked variety at majority most restaurants. If they don't cook it Al dente, I don't eat there.

Al
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Old 11-09-07, 09:12 AM   #4
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I read cinnamon and chromium are very good at stabalizing blood sugar.
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Old 11-12-07, 06:18 PM   #5
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I'm a diabetic myself (type I) and find that exercise significantly lowers my blood sugar. I use an insulin pump and when riding I almost always leave it at home, for i dont need any insulin while cycling. I actually find that exercise can lower my sugar too dramatically and that i need to eat a high-carb snack every so often. Also, the blood sugar-lowering effect that exercise has can also continue for many hours. For example, the day after a physically demanding ride i find i need to use less insulin than normal.
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Old 11-12-07, 06:40 PM   #6
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Fellow T2 here. I do best on a more balanced diet than a vegan diet would be. I beleive a lot of the protein that vegans and vegetarians depend on comes from soy. I avoid soy as much as possible since I already have a bad thyroid and some of the isflavaonoids in soy act as estrogens in the human body. This is not good for the thyroid although for most people it is not enough interference to matter much. I follow a diet that's closer to 50% carbs (mostly low GI carbs and fruts), 30% protein, and 20% fats (as much monounsaturated and omega 3's as possible).
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Old 11-12-07, 07:05 PM   #7
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Fellow T2 here. I beleive a lot of the protein that vegans and vegetarians depend on comes from soy. I avoid soy as much as possible since I already have a bad thyroid and some of the isflavaonoids in soy act as estrogens in the human body. This is not good for the thyroid although for most people it is not enough interference to matter much. I follow a diet that's closer to 50% carbs (mostly low GI carbs and fruts), 30% protein, and 20% fats (as much monounsaturated and omega 3's as possible).
I'm mostly vegan and I can't digest soy. It's very difficult to get enough protein based on my calculations, so I supplement with rice protein. It tasts fine mixed with a glass of water.

Al
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Old 11-12-07, 07:55 PM   #8
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rockchukkar - I sent you a PM. It is about another book to read.

I guess you can't get PM's for some reason.

The book is called:

The China Study


It has a lot of good information. I am only half way through it, but good information.
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Old 11-13-07, 09:46 AM   #9
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rockchukkar - I sent you a PM. It is about another book to read.


The book is called:

The China Study


It has a lot of good information. I am only half way through it, but good information.
There's been a lot of amusing and heated discussion/banter here about that book. I've brought it up frequently.

The China Study is kind of scary because it's so well scientifically founded. While Campbell chose to go vegan, the data presented can support somewhat less severe alternatives.

A recent cancer study based on reviewing 7000 relevant studies has drawn similar results to Campbell, at least where some cancers are concerned. Below is a short excerpt from the Economist. The whole study, all 517 pages is available as a free download @ http://www.dietandcancerreport.org/?p=er

An example of their reccomendations is that one should keep red meat consumtion to less than 18 oz a week.

Another intersting new ('07) book is Michael Pollan's The Omnivore's Dilemma.

Al



"To avoid the Big C, stay small

Nov 1st 2007
From The Economist print edition


The best ways to prevent cancer look remarkably like those needed to prevent obesity and heart disease as well

EVERY day there are new stories in the tabloids about the latest link, sometimes tenuous, sometimes contradictory, between cancer and some aspect of lifestyle. If this is a recipe for confusion, then the antidote is probably a weighty new tome from the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF). It is the most rigorous study so far on the links between food, physical activity and cancer—and sets out the important sources of risk.

Individually (except for smoking) these risks are quite small. However, many a mickle makes a muckle, and in total they add up to something significant. Roughly speaking, smoking is responsible for a third of cancers (smoking 20 cigarettes a day increases your risk of lung cancer 20-fold), poor food and lack of exercise result in another third, and other causes account for the rest. Some of this last third are known: genetic predisposition, ultraviolet sunlight, pollutants such as pesticides, and other factors including cosmic radiation and a naturally occurring radioactive gas called radon. But the picture is undoubtedly incomplete.


The research has taken six years, involved nine research institutes, and examined more than half a million publications—which were whittled down to 7,000 relevant ones. From these, the new guidelines spring. Few come as news (see table), but the most surprising is the degree to which even being a bit overweight is a risk. One of the most important things a person can do to avoid cancer is to maintain a body mass index (BMI) of between 21 and 23. According to the WCRF's medical and scientific adviser, Martin Wiseman, each five BMI points above this range doubles the risk of post-menopausal breast cancer and colorectal cancer. "
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Old 11-13-07, 12:02 PM   #10
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Thanks for the link for the other study. I am a meat eater, but I was also very fat and have lost over 100 pounds, mostly by watching my calories. I will probably never go vegetarian, let alone vegan, but I am looking at changing my food intake because of the book and other information that I have gathered about reducing the animal based protein intake.
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Old 11-14-07, 06:49 PM   #11
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Just over 2 years ago I was diagnosed as a Type II. My doctor put me on a couple of pills and told me to get more aerobic exercise (I was doing weights 3 days a week, but that's not aerobic). I bought a bike and started riding. I also adjusted my diet to cut out the sugars and starches. I still ate red meats, but less of them and more fowl and fish.

Long story short, after a year I had dropped 75 pounds and my blood sugars were under control. My doctor took me off first one, then the other pill. He's told me that, as far as he's concerned, I'm no longer diabetic and can eat pretty much anything I want. My pancreas and liver were producing and dealing with insulin properly on their own. The A1C tests proved that.

I still eat a high protein, low carb diet, although not as strict as I used to. I occasionally check my sugars to make sure I'm still good. It's been just under a year now and things are fine.

Now, I ride just under 28 miles a day, 5 days a week. I also put in another 3.5 or so hours of strength training every week. According to my heart rate monitor, I expend, on average, over 10,000 calories a week. Yeah, I know that opinions about the reliability of calorie consumption estimates from HR monitors varies quite a bit, but the bottom line is that I'm burning a bunch.

You can beat this thing if you work hard enough. It takes discipline, dedication, and time, but it was worth it to me.
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