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Old 01-30-08, 01:04 AM   #1
shaunx
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Whey protein????

Hey all any one know that is there any side effects for whey protein...? my trainer told me to have that daily after workout..any advice will be great...
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Old 01-30-08, 01:13 AM   #2
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I've used it (as part of other products) for years but then I am not lactose intolerant. If you have no problems with milk go for it.
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Old 01-30-08, 01:44 AM   #3
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The only side effect to whey is improved performance through recovery.
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Old 01-30-08, 07:00 AM   #4
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It's very hard on the kidneys. Not a problem with healthy kidneys, but keep in mind that several kidney diseases are sneaky. You may never know you have them until your kidneys are severely damaged. For example, diabetes or nephrosis of the kidneys.

Two things to consider:

Get checked out by a doctor. Check urine and/or blood for kidney function. Check for diabetes. And I would also check to see if you are voiding completely.

I would also consider that they whey protein is completely unecessary if you eat reasonably well. Piling on more protein than you need doesn't make you muscles bigger. Most of it is turned to glucose in your liver, the rest is evacuated, making your poop very expensive.

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Old 01-30-08, 10:19 AM   #5
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Watch out for whey gas.
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Old 01-30-08, 10:24 AM   #6
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Whey Protein

"Another serious toxic byproduct is whey protein, a byproduct of the dairy industry. Whey is milk protein that is discarded from the production of cow milk, a serious toxin to the human body. You can commonly find whey protein in your commercial brand health food stores and local gyms and fitness centers. The dairy industry targets athletes for their whey protein byproduct; perhaps figuring athletes generally are not the brightest individuals. Regardless, whey protein has no business in the human body. It is a waste byproduct and toxin to the human body. Beware of all those protein bars and beverages containing whey. The dairy industry, like all other byproduct waste industries, are using people as trash dumpsters and canisters to rid itself of waste that would otherwise cost it millions of dollars to dispose of. "

Source: http://www.dherbs.com/articles/waste-products-160.html
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Old 01-30-08, 10:28 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by Speedee View Post
Whey Protein

"Another serious toxic byproduct is whey protein, a byproduct of the dairy industry. Whey is milk protein that is discarded from the production of cow milk, a serious toxin to the human body. You can commonly find whey protein in your commercial brand health food stores and local gyms and fitness centers. The dairy industry targets athletes for their whey protein byproduct; perhaps figuring athletes generally are not the brightest individuals. Regardless, whey protein has no business in the human body. It is a waste byproduct and toxin to the human body. Beware of all those protein bars and beverages containing whey. The dairy industry, like all other byproduct waste industries, are using people as trash dumpsters and canisters to rid itself of waste that would otherwise cost it millions of dollars to dispose of. "

Source: http://www.dherbs.com/articles/waste-products-160.html
There's all sorts of unreliable information on the web.
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Old 01-30-08, 10:33 AM   #8
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I have takin whey protien on and off for years. I am and avid bodybiulder but my cholestoral went up and if you look at the label on the bottle it says 70% cholestoral right on the pakage. It's the only thing I can link to the problem.
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Old 01-30-08, 12:24 PM   #9
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I have takin whey protien on and off for years. I am and avid bodybiulder but my cholestoral went up and if you look at the label on the bottle it says 70% cholestoral right on the pakage. It's the only thing I can link to the problem.
I would say that's a problem related to the specific brand of whey protein which you purchased. Cholesterol is not part of protein, it is an entirely different material. whey proteins can be found in different concentrations and different formulas from many different providers. Some are almost pure protein; some are sweeteend with aspartame (nutrasweet), some with sucrolose (splenda), and some with Acesulfame K. Some have flavors that are ok, some have flavors that are downright awful. Shop around for the one that meets your criteria.
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Old 01-30-08, 01:10 PM   #10
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Whey protein is great when you use it after strenous muscle builiding activity, it has also been shown to decrease muscle remodelling if you use it before a workout too. It is digested extremely quickly so after a hard workout it helps to build muscle mass and strength. It is also good to have some slow digesting protein on board as well that will kick in to help with muscle repair after the whey protein has done its job. If you want to build muscle or preserve muscle while weight training or other muscle building exercises whey protein is great

As for being hard on the kidneys that applies to someone that is going through renal failure. There have been cultures that have survived on a diet of mainly meat and fat and have survived very well throughout the ages. If you are on the list for a transplant or undergoing kidney failure then you should probably avoid protein as well as a lot of other things. Of course if your kidneys have already conked out then the problem is the your probably not getting enough protein. A much bigger concern for kidney failure is being overweight and having high blood pressure. If you keep yourself fit and don't go overboard you should not have a problem with your kidneys.

Eat the protein that you would normally eat in a day and substitute the whey for some of it. If you are only into eating natural foods then you should stay away from whey because it is highly processed very pure form of protein. If you want a more natural source of whey try cottage cheese.

The only side effect I have noticed is that I put on muslce easier and I get zits on my chest and shoulders.

If you want more info look for some scientific meta analyses done on whey protein, there are some informative ones out there.
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Old 01-30-08, 01:27 PM   #11
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The only side effect I have noticed is that I put on muslce easier and I get zits on my chest and shoulders.

If you want more info look for some scientific meta analyses done on whey protein, there are some informative ones out there.

Would this be an indication of increased steroidal activity? Such as higher levels of unbound Testosterone and perhaps even HGH related to the higher protein intake and the exercise? I know you don't have a study, but what is your thoughts related to this?
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Old 01-30-08, 05:07 PM   #12
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Would this be an indication of increased steroidal activity? Such as higher levels of unbound Testosterone and perhaps even HGH related to the higher protein intake and the exercise? I know you don't have a study, but what is your thoughts related to this?
I'm not a 100% sure, what I have noticed is anecdotal so it is up for interpretation. But when I am not burdened by school work I do weights religiously. I noticed that I was not really getting stronger, I had plateaued. I did everything the same but I added whey protein before and after workouts and I noticed my strength and size increasing.

As for the zits I never though about it. I know more weight bearing exercise increases testosterone whereas endurance exercise decrease it, so it could be. I always though it was the protein powder because it is the only variable that I changed and I started to notice zits, and I am long past puberty. Plus, when I was pubescent I only got zits in the winter, never in the summer, and I hit the weights hard in the summer and that is when I supplement.

Maybe what you say is right about hormones, I could have de-stabalised some sex hormones, but I could have been vitamin deficient to, maybe a lack of vitamin A. I really don't have a clue but I think I am curious now and will have to try and find out.

Thanks for getting me thinking, now I have a reason not to study for the 5 exams and 3 papers that are due in the next 2 weeks
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Old 02-01-08, 08:22 AM   #13
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I'm not a 100% sure, what I have noticed is anecdotal so it is up for interpretation. But when I am not burdened by school work I do weights religiously. I noticed that I was not really getting stronger, I had plateaued. I did everything the same but I added whey protein before and after workouts and I noticed my strength and size increasing.

As for the zits I never though about it. I know more weight bearing exercise increases testosterone whereas endurance exercise decrease it, so it could be. I always though it was the protein powder because it is the only variable that I changed and I started to notice zits, and I am long past puberty. Plus, when I was pubescent I only got zits in the winter, never in the summer, and I hit the weights hard in the summer and that is when I supplement.

Maybe what you say is right about hormones, I could have de-stabalised some sex hormones, but I could have been vitamin deficient to, maybe a lack of vitamin A. I really don't have a clue but I think I am curious now and will have to try and find out.

Thanks for getting me thinking, now I have a reason not to study for the 5 exams and 3 papers that are due in the next 2 weeks

Can I get a 15 page report on your findings? I'd like it on my desk 3 days after those 5 exams
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Old 02-01-08, 12:46 PM   #14
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Whey Protein - Supplement Review
By John M. Berardi
First published at www.johnberardi.com, Dec 27 2003.

Nutrient:
Whey Protein

What is it?

Whey protein is a milk protein extract recognized for its excellent amino acid profile, high cysteine content, rapid digestion, and interesting peptides (lacto globulins, immunoglobulins, lactoferrin, etc).

What does it do?

Whey protein, like other protein sources, provides a rich amino acid supply to the body. Current data suggest that exercise can increase protein needs and that increased protein intakes can improve the response to exercise training. Whey protein is rapidly digested and this property of whey makes it optimal for post-exercise consumption since rapid increases in blood amino acid concentrations can lead to acute increases in protein synthesis. Furthermore, since whey protein contains a good amount of cysteine, whey protein may contribute to improved antioxidant defense (via increases in glutathione) in the body.

Where does it come from?

Whey protein makes up approximately 20% of the protein in milk. The beneficial properties of whey protein are partly a result of the amino acid composition and partly a result of the active peptides (the unique amino acid chain configurations that make up whey). In order to prevent the denaturing (or destruction) of the interesting peptides, appropriate processing techniques are required. The best processing includes ion exchange whey protein isolation (yielding approximately 90% protein with only 10% additional ingredients including lactose and fat) and cross flow micro filtration, yielding approximately 99% whey protein and high calcium content.

How do I use it?

Whey protein is a convenient way to supplement one’s whole food diet with additional protein and amino acids. Usually I suggest using anywhere between 20 and 40g per day of supplemental whey protein. After exercise, whey protein is especially useful as its rapid digestion and absorption provides the body with a rapid influx of amino acids for improving protein status. Protein supplements, however, should never be used as one’s exclusive protein source.

Credibility Rating -- 4/4

Rating Scale:

4/4 This supplement/regimen has significant scientific backing and can
produce significant benefits in most individuals.
3/4 There exists a sound theoretical basis for its ergogenic effects; may
work in certain individuals; further research is needed to elucidate
their respective effects.
2/4 Science is equivocal, animal data and human data may be conflicting;
or mechanism of action may be unclear.
1/4 Little or no science as well as poor theoretical foundation.

Scientific References:

1. Alting, AC et al. Formation of disulfide bonds in acid-induced gels of preheated whey protein isolate. J Agric Food Chem, 48(10), 5001-7, 2000.

2. Boirie, Y et al. Slow and fast dietary proteins differently modulate postprandial protein accretion. Proc Natl Acad Sci. 94, 14930-14935, 1997.

3. Bounous, G and Gold P. The biological activity of undenatured dietary whey proteins: role of glutathione. Clin Invest Med, 4(4), 296-309, 1991.

4. Coste, M and Tome, D. Milk proteins with physiological activities: II. Opioid and immunostimulating peptides derived from milk protein. Lait, 71, 241-247, 1991.

5. Dangin, M et al. The digestion rate of protein is an independent regulating factor of postprandial protein retention. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab, 280(2), E340-348, 2001.

6. Demling, R and DeSanti, L. Increased protein intake during the recovery phase after severe burns increases body weight gain and muscle function. J Burn Care Rehabil, 16, 161-168, 1998.

7. Demling, RH and DeSanti, L. Effect of a hypocaloric diet, increased protein intake and resistance training on lean mass gains and fat mass loss in overweight police officers. Ann Nutr Metab. 44. 21-29, 2000.

8. Desrosiers, T and Savoie L. Extent of damage to amino acid availability of whey protein heated with sugar. J Dairy Res, 58(4), 431-41, 1991.

9. Enomoto, A et al. Milk whey protein fed as a constituent of the diet induced both oral tolerance and a systemic humoral response, while heat-denatured whey protein induced only oral tolerance. Clin Immunol Immunopathol, 66(2), 136-142, 1993.

10. Hambraeus, L. Importance of milk proteins in human nutrition: Physiological aspects. In Milk Proteins ’84. Proceedings of the International Congress on Milk Proteins. Galesloot, TE and Tinbergen BJ (eds). Pudoc Wageningen, Luxemburg, 1985.

11. Kinsella, JE and Whitehead, DM. Proteins in whey: chemical, physical, and functional properties. Adv Food Nutr Res, 33, 343-438, 1989.

12. Law, AJ and Lever, J. Effect of pH on the thermal denaturation of whey proteins in milk. J Agric Food Chem, 48(3), 672-679, 2000.

13. Mahe, S et al. Gastrojejunal kinetics and the digestion of [15N]beta-lactoglobulin and casein in humans: the influence of the nature and quantity of the protein. Am J Clin Nutr, 63(4), 546-552, 1996.

14. Rossano, R, D’Elia, A, Riccio, P. One-step separation from lactose: recovery and purification of major cheese-whey proteins by hydroxyapatite--a flexible procedure suitable for small- and medium-scale preparations. Protein Expr Purif 2001 Feb;21(1):165-9.

15. Ziemlanski, S et al. Balanced intraintestinal nutrition: digestion, absorption and biological value of selected preparations of milk proteins. Acta Physiol Pol, 29(6), 543-556, 1978.


2002 - 2005 Science Link, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
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Old 02-03-08, 09:23 PM   #15
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Whey Protein

"Another serious toxic byproduct is whey protein, a byproduct of the dairy industry. Whey is milk protein that is discarded from the production of cow milk, a serious toxin to the human body. You can commonly find whey protein in your commercial brand health food stores and local gyms and fitness centers. The dairy industry targets athletes for their whey protein byproduct; perhaps figuring athletes generally are not the brightest individuals. Regardless, whey protein has no business in the human body. It is a waste byproduct and toxin to the human body. Beware of all those protein bars and beverages containing whey. The dairy industry, like all other byproduct waste industries, are using people as trash dumpsters and canisters to rid itself of waste that would otherwise cost it millions of dollars to dispose of. "

Source:
Wow, that's up there with some of the most moronic and uninformed statements I've ever read in here. I'm sure it's put up out of altruism, though...certainly not to sell their own products (it's just a happy coincidence).


Whey protein is fine and well-tolerated by most people. It can be a very convenient way of increasing protein consumption if you're into that. It is probably a good idea to avoid it if you are lactose intolerant as it may contain some lactose. And obviously it *must* be avoided if you have milk protein allergy.
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Old 02-04-08, 08:10 AM   #16
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with milk my fat will get increased

I dont have anything with milk..but the problem is that my trainer told me that if i am serving wheyprotein with milk my fat will get increased...anyways thanks for your time and reply..cheers
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Old 02-04-08, 09:22 AM   #17
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I dont have anything with milk..but the problem is that my trainer told me that if i am serving wheyprotein with milk my fat will get increased...anyways thanks for your time and reply..cheers
Perhaps your trainer is not aware that there are low-fat versions of whey protein, in addition to NON-fat varieties of milk?
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Old 02-06-08, 07:16 PM   #18
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It's very hard on the kidneys. Not a problem with healthy kidneys, but keep in mind that several kidney diseases are sneaky. You may never know you have them until your kidneys are severely damaged. For example, diabetes or nephrosis of the kidneys.

Two things to consider:

Get checked out by a doctor. Check urine and/or blood for kidney function. Check for diabetes. And I would also check to see if you are voiding completely.

I would also consider that they whey protein is completely unecessary if you eat reasonably well. Piling on more protein than you need doesn't make you muscles bigger. Most of it is turned to glucose in your liver, the rest is evacuated, making your poop very expensive.

Az
Careful with that advise. Protein is not hard on the kidneys. Kidneys which aren't functioning well cannot efficiently filter urea (a breakdown product of protein) resulting in high urea in the body. High urea in the body makes you feel crappy. Therefore, with bad kindeys, a low protein diet is recommended, not because protein is bad for the kidneys, but to prevent the build-up of urea. Protein itself has not effect on the kindeys.

Whey protein has no more side effect than milk.

Joe
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Old 02-06-08, 07:58 PM   #19
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For those who are lactose intolerant, there is whey isolate which pretty much all protein supplement companies offer as an alternative. It's more expensive than regular whey, of course.

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Careful with that advise. Protein is not hard on the kidneys....Whey protein has no more side effect than milk.

Joe
I do NOT agree with the above. My peers at bodybuilding.com, however, would unanimously agree that protein causes no long-term damage while my friends who are practicing doctors do warn of kidney damage. The argument goes both ways: protein is broken down into urea and nitrogen and then benignly excreted...versus...high amounts of protein intake causes kidney stones. Also, the increased filtration needed to remove urea & nitrogen causes elevated kidney function and stresses the organ. I've come across enough studies that hint at the possibility of kidney damage BUT there are no definitive conclusions. For every study you find saying there is damage, there's another study proving otherwise.

If you decide to supplement with whey, be sure to hydrate properly. I also agree with speaking to your doctor about possible problems, such as testing for kidney function (BUN and creatinine) and discussing any family history of diabetes/high BP. Be careful if you decide to have more than 1.5g/kg (bodyweight)/day of protein. Also, insist on regular kidney function tests once you're on the supplement. I know of bodybuilders who pay out of pocket to have their blood tested for BUN and creatinine levels. Of course, they are on a "stack" of supplements including but not limited to pro-hormones/creatine/b-alanine/etc.

If you are concerned, why not just drink an extra glass of milk or eat a bit more meat? The typical American diet usually contains quite a bit of protein though.

Last edited by doughboy; 02-06-08 at 08:23 PM.
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Old 02-06-08, 08:34 PM   #20
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For those who are lactose intolerant, there is whey isolate which pretty much all protein supplement companies offer as an alternative. It's more expensive than regular whey, of course.



I do NOT agree with the above. My peers at bodybuilding.com, however, would unanimously agree that protein causes no long-term damage while my friends who are practicing doctors do warn of kidney damage. The argument goes both ways: protein is broken down into urea and nitrogen and then benignly excreted...versus...high amounts of protein intake causes kidney stones. Also, the increased filtration needed to remove urea & nitrogen causes elevated kidney function and stresses the organ. I've come across enough studies that hint at the possibility of kidney damage BUT there are no definitive conclusions. For every study you find saying there is damage, there's another study proving otherwise.

If you decide to supplement with whey, be sure to hydrate properly. I also agree with speaking to your doctor about possible problems, such as testing for kidney function (BUN and creatinine) and discussing any family history of diabetes/high BP. Be careful if you decide to supplement with more than 1.5g/kg (bodyweight)/day. Also, insist on regular kidney function tests once you're on the supplement. I know of bodybuilders who pay out of pocket to have their blood tested for BUN and creatinine levels. Of course, they are on a "stack" of supplements including but not limited to pro-hormones/creatine/b-alanine/etc.

If you are concerned, why not just drink an extra glass of milk or eat a bit more meat? The typical American diet usually contains quite a bit of protein though.
Fair enough, but lets be realistic here. The OP is inquiring about whey protein after a ride. I take this to mean adding a scoop to milk or juice or whatever and chugging away. Your peers at bodybuilding.com are probably taking far in excess of this (and no doubt way more than most cyclists would take). Assuming a "normal" diet, adding a scoop or 2 of whey protein daily will have no effect on kidneys. If the OP had asked about eating a steak after every ride, I doubt even you doctor friends would have warned against it lest it cause kidney damage. Why should it be any different for whey protein?

My point was don't scare the OP away from a scoop of whey by suggesting that it will harm his kidneys.

Last edited by Vetboy; 02-06-08 at 08:40 PM.
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Old 02-07-08, 01:03 AM   #21
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Protein is protein. If you take too much of it, it will put unnecessary strain on your kidneys, no doubt. But if you don't eat enough protein otherwise, topping up with whey doesn't harm your kidneys any more than more protein through your normal diet does.
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Old 02-07-08, 12:41 PM   #22
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Fair enough, but lets be realistic here. The OP is inquiring about whey protein after a ride. I take this to mean adding a scoop to milk or juice or whatever and chugging away....

My point was don't scare the OP away from a scoop of whey by suggesting that it will harm his kidneys.
I understand. I just want him to explore any possible complications with his doctor before he begins protein supplementation. For those prone to kidney disease (family history of diabetes or high BP), it's best to keep a low to moderate protein consumption. I know I'm being conservative, but not knowing anything about the OP, I'd err towards that.

I will agree that one scoop (usually ~20g protein) is unlikely to cause any problems.
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Old 02-07-08, 08:40 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by Speedee View Post
Whey Protein

"Another serious toxic byproduct is whey protein, a byproduct of the dairy industry. Whey is milk protein that is discarded from the production of cow milk, a serious toxin to the human body. You can commonly find whey protein in your commercial brand health food stores and local gyms and fitness centers. The dairy industry targets athletes for their whey protein byproduct; perhaps figuring athletes generally are not the brightest individuals. Regardless, whey protein has no business in the human body. It is a waste byproduct and toxin to the human body. Beware of all those protein bars and beverages containing whey. The dairy industry, like all other byproduct waste industries, are using people as trash dumpsters and canisters to rid itself of waste that would otherwise cost it millions of dollars to dispose of. "

Source: http://www.dherbs.com/articles/waste-products-160.html
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Old 02-08-08, 08:43 AM   #24
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Originally Posted by doughboy View Post
I understand. I just want him to explore any possible complications with his doctor before he begins protein supplementation. For those prone to kidney disease (family history of diabetes or high BP), it's best to keep a low to moderate protein consumption. I know I'm being conservative, but not knowing anything about the OP, I'd err towards that.

I will agree that one scoop (usually ~20g protein) is unlikely to cause any problems.
Last I heard (from my Dr.), a moderate intake of protein (20% or so of calories for a 2000Kcal/day diet) is not considered harmful unless you already have kidney damage. I am a diabetic, so this is something I worry about. However, since Diabetics are generally steered towards a low fat diet, it can be difficult to get adequate protein intake for an active person, such as a body builder or cyclists. Given that it can be difficult to get adequate protein without excess fat consumption through whole foods, protein supplements can be quite handy.
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Old 02-08-08, 09:38 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Speedee View Post
Whey Protein

"Another serious toxic byproduct is whey protein, a byproduct of the dairy industry. Whey is milk protein that is discarded from the production of cow milk, a serious toxin to the human body. You can commonly find whey protein in your commercial brand health food stores and local gyms and fitness centers. The dairy industry targets athletes for their whey protein byproduct; perhaps figuring athletes generally are not the brightest individuals. Regardless, whey protein has no business in the human body. It is a waste byproduct and toxin to the human body. Beware of all those protein bars and beverages containing whey. The dairy industry, like all other byproduct waste industries, are using people as trash dumpsters and canisters to rid itself of waste that would otherwise cost it millions of dollars to dispose of. "

Source: http://www.dherbs.com/articles/waste-products-160.html
From the same, clearly science-based, web site cited above:

"The liver holds ANGER. The pancreas holds BITTERNESS and REGRET. The heart holds SORROW, JEALOUSY, and GRIEF. The kidneys hold FEAR."
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