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  1. #1
    Don't Taunt Happyfunball cyclochica's Avatar
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    ? for the spinning instructors

    Ok I just got back from my spinning class (it's raining so I didn't ride today) and I have a few questions. During the class we were asked to do these things called jumps, which are kind of like really fast squats on the bike while pedaling. What is the purpose of this move? I never bounce up and down out of the saddle when I ride. On top of that they seem like a knee injury waiting to happen, but that maybe because our counts seem too fast for this to be effective.

    Can you all clue me in on what this move is supposed to do and if I am missing out on some fitness benefit by not doing it?
    There can be only one.

  2. #2
    Velolutionary IowaParamedic's Avatar
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    I am guessing, but it should be strength building exercise to give you more strength to get in and out of saddle.

    There is also a boredom issue, it breaks up the workout a little.

    I agree, they are not knee-friendly and not particularly "male"-friendly.

    IMO, it is a remnant of aerobic dance instructors who wear pink leotards and teach spinning like it is aerobics on bikes - not the same as the spinning demons who wear black and sport tattoos and dish out pain like pez candy. Just my opinion and I should take cover before the flames begin to be thrown.

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    Illigitimi Non Carborundum
    Visit Bicyclists of Iowa City -- Ride AHCAST on Sept 18 & 19

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclochica
    Ok I just got back from my spinning class (it's raining so I didn't ride today) and I have a few questions. During the class we were asked to do these things called jumps, which are kind of like really fast squats on the bike while pedaling. What is the purpose of this move? I never bounce up and down out of the saddle when I ride. On top of that they seem like a knee injury waiting to happen, but that maybe because our counts seem too fast for this to be effective.

    Can you all clue me in on what this move is supposed to do and if I am missing out on some fitness benefit by not doing it?

    Don't do it.

    Bored bunny instructors with no clue as to what cycling is perform what we call "contraindicated moves". Moves like what you described are definitely stress on the knees and can lead to knee injuries over time. Avoid these instructors like they have airborn VD and they're trying to spread it to everyone around them. I'll guarantee that they are 1) not certified or 2) have no continuing ed since they got certified or 3) got certified many years ago and haven't been updated since. Either scenario, it's a bad scene, and for what they're telling you to do, it's not worth busting your knees over so that you can't go back to cycling in the summer.

    Fast jumps are nothing- they were sanctioned at one time for creating rhythmic movement while riding, but they are now discouraged by every legitimate organization out there. Jumps are done a lot slower, with more time emphasized out of the saddle to develop the core and quads. When the jumps are performed in a slower manner, transition from seated to standing and back to seated can be emphasized. If I get my class to jump, we may jump about 4- 5 times in a 5 minute song (for instance). Even then, I'm stressing that this is not realistic for the road for a lot of cyclists- my classes know better than to do those ridiculous jumps. Besides, they just look like rabbits on crack when they're doing it anyway- why would I lower my class to looking like a bunch of jumping idiots?

    The bouncing in the saddle is indicative of too little resistance for the flywheel. When the speed of the wheel exceeds the speed of the legs, it creates a disconnection of the foot from the pedal at the bottom of the pedal stroke. This disconnection creates vibrations that travel up the legs, creating a bouncing effect in the butt. Also, since the vibrations are going up through the legs, it also creates a vibration in the knees that can cause knee damage over time. Any haf intelligent instructor knows these simplistic explanations. For crying out loud, they friggin' diagram it out for you in most books so you can see it for yourself. I've even seen lectures where physical therapists came in and demonstrated a video of the tearing of the kneecaps during a bouncing movement, and it doesn't look pretty.

    If you're interested in this stuff, send me a PM. I would be glad to write you out a list of things to take to each instructor and ask them, plus give you the answers of how they respond. If they answer in the incorrect way, slowly back out the door and run run run as fast as you can. They suck and you don't need to waste your time on them. Seriously.

    Koffee

  4. #4
    Don't Taunt Happyfunball cyclochica's Avatar
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    Thanks KB and IP for responding. During the class I didn't bother with the jumps. I haven't decided on whether or not I am going to continue with that particular class. Lately, I have been trying to get in as much time on my bike as I can, especially since I want to double my mileage in 2004.

    If I do stick with the classes as a wet weather alternative, I will do as KB suggested once and do my own thing. I think I'll get much more benefit from practicing my spinning than imitating a rabbit on crack (an image that makes me laugh out loud every time I think about it). I am also going to check out some of the other instructors, I know one of them is an actual cyclist but his class doesn't fit into my schedule.

    Thanks so much for giving me low down.

    CC
    There can be only one.

  5. #5
    Crank Crushing Redneck SamDaBikinMan's Avatar
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    I always do my own thing when I go to cycling classes since I know how I need to train. I just alert the instructor to that fact before hand so they will not think I am ignoring them.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  6. #6
    Senior Member demoncyclist's Avatar
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    Koffee, as usual, is correct about the contraindication of what are known as popcorn jumps. In my classes, I do use jumps at a slower pace. Regular jumping is with the hands at position 2- the top of a regular road bar, and jumping on a hill would have you move your hands to position 3- similar to moving to the hoods of your road bike- as you stand out of the saddle. The purpose of the movement is to smooth out the transition from seated to standing. Most people change their pedal technique and cadence as they stand. The idea here is to transition smoothly to a piston-like pedal stroke as you stand, and back to a full, round stroke as you sit. Try to keep your cadence steady, and make sure that leg power pushes you out of the saddle and supports you as you slowly settle back. You should keep your weight off the bars. You should also have enough resistance on the flywheel to support your weight. As you get stronger, you will be able to balance with less resistance on the wheel, just make sure to keep enough there that you DO NOT bounce. I tend to coach jumps by time, not pedal strokes, to encourage my students to push off with the opposite leg on each jump, usually with 10 second intervals. Don't give up on Spinning, but definitely shop around for a cycling based instructor, not an "aerobic bunny."
    DEMON

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  7. #7
    Don't Believe the Hype RiPHRaPH's Avatar
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    i use the classes for my benefit. for example, i let the instructor know in advance that i am working on a specific program and just need the motivation of the music or cadence...i hate jumps.

    but most people are in spin class to stay in shape. many are not road cyclists and are attending class as part of a weight loss program.

    i've got 9:30am class today. this guy is an ex-marine and tough. his classes are full, and if he has been out drinking the night before that means a tougher class.
    I have enough words to get me into trouble, but not enough to get me out of trouble.

  8. #8
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    RiPHRaPH is describing the typical cycling "coach". The one who just spends their time grinding the participants into the ground. I've seen those instructors, and I also look at the students. They are the ones who make absolutely no improvements in how they look or feel whatsoever. There may be a slight improvement in cardiovascular, but training like that all the time only leads to a low aerobic threshold and overtraining. I remember when one of my clubs (the big ones with the rabid instructors) hired professionals to come in and measure performance output for our members (members paid a nominal fee for this rare opportunity). The professionals were dumbfounded- most everyone that took the test had extremely low aerobic thresholds and were using more carbs as opposed to fat as their primary fuel source. Even more than that, when measuring max heart rate, they were consistently lower than others who exercised the same amount at other clubs, although people could exercise above anaerobic threshold easily (although not as long a period of time- just slightly less than those who exercised more sensibly). The end result? If these people ever decided to compete, they'd perform poorly. Also, they would be less likely to burn fat efficiently, so they would maintain higher bodyfat percentages than others who exercised in a program that adhered to a training program (periodized) where higher and lower intensity training is structured so that performance improves over time.

    Sad, really.

    Every person that exercises should be in training. Even people who are not racing are in training. That's how a good instructor will look at their classes, and we design a structured program that conforms to the goal of the participant. If you are trying to lose weight, you still are in a structured program- it's just not the same intensity of training you'd give to someone who is in training for races. The people who just want a better aerobic fitness are in training, but their goals are just a bit different than the person who's overfat and needs to train specifically to target increased metabolism leading to fat loss.

    Everyone's in training. It's just how you apply the training to the individual that produces the results they're going for, that's all.

    Every class (but one club) I teach adheres to a 12 month periodization program. Every person's in training as far as I'm concerned. If someone's not making progress, they see me after class, I make changes to their routine, and they use those changes to do what they need to do to get back on track. To that end, there will be times when I am instructing and people are doing different things in class- no big deal for me. I'm just here to help and to get them the improvements they're looking for. And they have fun in the process too.

    All right, I'm off my soapbox now.

    Koffee

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