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    Senior Member Velo Fellow's Avatar
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    Lactate Threshhold HR ???

    can someone explain LTHR-- how to find it and how to use it as a training aid? How would someone apply it to heart rate training zones?How does it differ from the usual maximum HR? Thanks.

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    Twincities MN kuan's Avatar
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    You can read this post that's stuck to the top of this forum.

    2x20 Anaerobic threshold test

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    umd
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    If you know your LT, you can basically keep your HR below that indefinitely. I had mine determined through a VO2 (submax) test, and I was initially skeptical of the result because it was lower than I thought it should have been based on other perceived effort tests. Since then, my observations have beared out the results, and it has been very helpful for limiting my effort to improve endurance, especially on long climbs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Velo Fellow View Post
    can someone explain LTHR-- how to find it and how to use it as a training aid? How would someone apply it to heart rate training zones?How does it differ from the usual maximum HR? Thanks.
    Others have already reference the field test. There's also a Carmichael field test that uses two 3-mile efforts with a recovery in between - most people get similar zones between the two tests.

    To get the most out of your training, you need to know where you LTHR is, so you can be working in the right zones. As you get more trained, your lactate threshold is a higher percentage of your maximum heart rate.

    What that means is that if you set zones based on maximum heart rate, they are likely too hard if you aren't very well trained and not hard enough if you are well trained.

    Note that there's a lot of pain to had in these tests...
    Eric

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  5. #5
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    Think of LTHR as your highest average HR for a 1 hour effort...not that most want to do a 1 hour effort to find it...instead you can do any of a number of ramp tests - the key is to find the HR that is sustainable for an hour - as an aside LTHR as used in most of these tests is really measuring Onset Blood Lactate Accumulation (OBLA) instead of true LTHR - true LTHR is based off the movement from baseline in lactate concentration - which is usually 1m/mol (per Testa). For example i just did a test a couple of weeks ago with an LTHR of 130hr/200Watts - which correlates to 1m/mol - while my OBLA was 310W at 163HR...HR would rise at this workload though...and by the end of the hour it would probably be more akin to 174 (these were 4min stages, submaximal test), which is what i've seen as an average in a 40k tt (55min) - so I tend to use 174 and 310W as my LT values - despite the error in nomenclature.

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