Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Training & Nutrition Learn how to develop a training schedule that's good for you. What should you eat and drink on your ride? Learn everything you need to know about training and nutrition here.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 04-01-04, 02:26 PM   #1
lnomura
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Redlands, CA
Bikes: Canondale
Posts: 16
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hill Climbing Training

I have two centuries coming up that have a tremendous amount of hill climbing involved. One is 8,000 feet, the other is 12,000 feet.

Wanted to get ideas for a training program to help prepare for this. I currently am riding around 120 miles a week on average, we live in an area that has a lot of hills. I also cross train with some weight training, treadmill work and pilates.

I have never done this difficult of a Century, I have only done Tucson (which was relatively flat) and Solvang (which had 2 relatively mild - moderate hills).

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks.

Laura (Redlands, CA)
lnomura is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-04, 02:46 PM   #2
SteveE
Veni, Vidi, Vomiti
 
SteveE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Republic of Anaerobia
Bikes: Serotta Legend Ti, Romani Columbus SL, Soma Doublecross
Posts: 3,582
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Continue doing hill work. Plan to do at least one ride a week or so in advance of the Century which covers 75-80% of both the distance and climbing that you'll being doing on the day of your Century.
SteveE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-04, 05:07 PM   #3
socalrider
Senior Member
 
socalrider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Upland, CA
Bikes: Litespeed Liege, Motorola Team Issue Eddy Mercxk, Surly Crosscheck Cyclocross bike, Fisher Supercaliber Mtn. Bike
Posts: 5,002
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have done long centuries with lots of climbing before and you need to prepare yourself for the climbing involved.. One of the betters places to ride which is just an hour west of you is a road called Glendora Mtn Ridge road.. It is a well traveled climb that has about 18 miles of steady climbing.. This road traverses from Glendora and ends at Mt. Baldy road.. The entire ride is about 40 miles round trip.. This is one of the best long steady climbs in So Cal and not too many cars.. I would say the grade is between 6-8%, only 2 short downhills..
socalrider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-04, 06:42 PM   #4
SipperPhoto
The Cycling Photographer
 
SipperPhoto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Orange, CA
Bikes:
Posts: 1,403
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by lnomura
I have two centuries coming up that have a tremendous amount of hill climbing involved. One is 8,000 feet, the other is 12,000 feet.

Wanted to get ideas for a training program to help prepare for this. I currently am riding around 120 miles a week on average, we live in an area that has a lot of hills. I also cross train with some weight training, treadmill work and pilates.

I have never done this difficult of a Century, I have only done Tucson (which was relatively flat) and Solvang (which had 2 relatively mild - moderate hills).

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks.

Laura (Redlands, CA)
Which rides are you doing ??? Ride Around the Bear ? Santiago Cycling's Breathless agony ?

as far as hills go... just find the longest nastiest hills you can, and just keep working at them... Try going up to Big Bear, and riding at Altitude up there... Hills suck... especially at altitude... but the more you train on hills, the better you will be at them

jeff
SipperPhoto is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-04, 08:34 PM   #5
lnomura
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Redlands, CA
Bikes: Canondale
Posts: 16
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by SipperPhoto
Which rides are you doing ??? Ride Around the Bear ? Santiago Cycling's Breathless agony ?

as far as hills go... just find the longest nastiest hills you can, and just keep working at them... Try going up to Big Bear, and riding at Altitude up there... Hills suck... especially at altitude... but the more you train on hills, the better you will be at them

jeff
Jeff - Yes those are the two. Are you familiar with them? I will be doing both for the first time. Last weekend we did the 75 Tour of the Canyons and climbed Oak Glen. From what people are telling me we need to climb multiple hills in one day to train.
lnomura is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-04, 08:40 PM   #6
SSP
Software for Cyclists
 
SSP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Redding, California
Bikes: Trek 5200, Specialized MTB
Posts: 4,618
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
In addition to the good training advice you've been give above, be very careful to take in sufficient fluids and food during the century rides. It's especially important that you take in enough salt to replace what you'll sweat out, and enough food that you don't bonk. Even if the ride organizers are providing rest stops, I highly recommend bringing 2 or 3 gels. I normally throw down a PowerGel just before the start of a big climb - the combination of quick carbs and caffeine gives me a physical and psychological boost that helps get me up the hill.

Also, use your heart rate monitor, and don't start out too fast. It's very tempting to latch on to a 24 mph paceline early in the ride, but if there's a bunch of climbing ahead, you might very well regret it.

Good luck!
SSP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-04, 10:45 AM   #7
SipperPhoto
The Cycling Photographer
 
SipperPhoto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Orange, CA
Bikes:
Posts: 1,403
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by lnomura
Jeff - Yes those are the two. Are you familiar with them? I will be doing both for the first time. Last weekend we did the 75 Tour of the Canyons and climbed Oak Glen. From what people are telling me we need to climb multiple hills in one day to train.
I am familiar with them.. although I have never done them... need to get the legs in better shape for some killer climbs like that... I here they are fun, but a lot of work

Santiago cycling is about 3 miles from my house... I know they run clinics out out there on hill climbing, mostly jsut to prepare for the ride

jeff
SipperPhoto is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-04, 01:17 PM   #8
vixen2yall
Senior Member
 
vixen2yall's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Bikes: Greenspeed GTC (Sheila) 2001 model, raleigh S.U.B. touring (Francis the talking M.U.L.E.) 2003 model, Marin Belvadere (Ursa) 2006 model,
Posts: 180
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by socalrider
I have done long centuries with lots of climbing before and you need to prepare yourself for the climbing involved.. One of the betters places to ride which is just an hour west of you is a road called Glendora Mtn Ridge road.. It is a well traveled climb that has about 18 miles of steady climbing.. This road traverses from Glendora and ends at Mt. Baldy road.. The entire ride is about 40 miles round trip.. This is one of the best long steady climbs in So Cal and not too many cars.. I would say the grade is between 6-8%, only 2 short downhills..
be careful on that road on the weekends. the local kids love taking their cars down it as fast as they can and they aren't the safest drivers. i've known a few people who took their car off the side and didn't make it home alive. i'd say best day/times for that road is monday/thursday during school hours, when all the local kiddies are in class. it's been a few years sense i was there but i'm sure the highschool drivers haven't improved. it's a beautiful road though. just be carefull out there.

best of luck
kat
vixen2yall is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-04, 01:45 PM   #9
zonatandem
Senior Member
 
zonatandem's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Tucson, AZ
Bikes: Custom Zona c/f tandem + Scott Plasma single
Posts: 10,858
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 28 Post(s)
Put panniers on your bike. Load them up with heavy books/rocks. Start climbing! Put in lotsa miles like that.
Day of the rides (minus panniers) you will climb better than ever!
P.S. Have done 22,000 ft of climbing in 3 days on the Answer to the Challenge in central/northern Arizona, on our tandem.
Go girl, you can do it!
zonatandem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-04, 02:06 PM   #10
SSP
Software for Cyclists
 
SSP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Redding, California
Bikes: Trek 5200, Specialized MTB
Posts: 4,618
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by zonatandem
Put panniers on your bike. Load them up with heavy books/rocks. Start climbing! Put in lotsa miles like that.
Day of the rides (minus panniers) you will climb better than ever!
P.S. Have done 22,000 ft of climbing in 3 days on the Answer to the Challenge in central/northern Arizona, on our tandem.
Go girl, you can do it!
No offense, but the idea of improving your climbing by training with weight added on your bike is an old one...and, one that is generally discredited.

Climbing effectively is about training your cardiovascular system to handle the stress, and learning how to manage your energy reserves so you don't blow up before the summit. Adding weight to your bike does nothing but make your training rides slower. It won't help you work on finding your optimum cadence, nor will it help you to get a feel for which gear you should be using for the grade you are climbing.

Also, rides with lots of climbing usually have a lot of descending...this requires training too, and training for downhills with a loaded bike is not a good idea either.

If the "added weight" training technique was effective in improving climbing, you would expect that pro riders would do this. But, they don't, because it doesn't work.
SSP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-04, 04:12 PM   #11
nhorscro
Senior Member
 
nhorscro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Laguna Niguel, CA, USA
Bikes:
Posts: 94
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Yes those are the two. Are you familiar with them? I will be doing both for the first time. Last weekend we did the 75 Tour of the Canyons and climbed Oak Glen. From what people are telling me we need to climb multiple hills in one day to train.
I've never done the Ride Around the Bear but my club is the organizer and I'll be working at rest-stop 5. From what I have heard most of the climbing is in the first 40 miles or so. Since you are in Redlands I would suggest you try to ride those first 40 miles a few times. I don't know your fitness level so you may want to start out going for less than 40 and then just turning around and rolling back to Redlands.

Here's the profile for the ride, showing that it is basically one very big hill!!

http://www.caltriplecrown.com/Centuries/Bear.htm
nhorscro is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:52 AM.