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  1. #1
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    Quitting smoking guide

    I am starting this thread because I am planning my strategy to quitting, which is now about one month away. I am going to throw everything I have smoking related away the second or third week of May, and I could use all of the help and success stories that I can!

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    Go to your doctor and tell him you want to guit.Its what i did and my doc gave me zyban for 2 months.Its been 6 months and i havent smoked.Its hard to stop and this is only one of a number of times but with the zyban i think i will quit for good..........good luck.
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    this is what worked for me:

    one day, i just decided that even though i liked taking smoking breaks from work and i like smooking in bars and whatnot, i just didn't want to be a "smoker" anymroe. so i quit. i didn't throw anything away(in fact, a year later i still have a pack of marlboro menthol's in my desk b/c i'm kind of masochistic like that), didn't make any other life changes. just stopped, and didn't allow myself to smoke again. it was simply a matter of not wanting to smoke anymroe. i don't know if this works for other people. but i think if it's something you want to do, i mean really want to do, not jsut talk about and say you want to do it, you'll find a way. so, good luck finding your way, so long as it's something you really want to do.

    dan

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    Cold turkey. Gum and hard candy helped my dad quit after 40 years.
    Touch every 3rd person and you'll find an idiot.

  5. #5
    Zin
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    Hey congrats on the decision to quit! I used Welbuterin(sp). Works like a charm. No cravings etc. Been smoke free for over 2 years now! (Still get a craving now and then, but they are easy to ignore).

    Good luck!
    Bob

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    Oh God, He's back! 1oldRoadie's Avatar
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    What worked for me is that I am a natural born Procrastinator.

    I was given a little card (that I put in my shirt pocket where I usually kept my cigarettes)...it read "The urge will go away within 5 minutes, whether you smoke the cigarette or not".

    And I can put anything off for 5 minutes.

    So I put off lighting the next one for 12 years, 5 minutes at a time.
    I can't ride and Frown!

  7. #7
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    I think that would work well for me, as I am the king of procrastination. I once put off a 3-5 page paper until 2 hours before it was due. I have quit before, but then I ended up dating a girl who smoked, and I have smoked ever since. My current gilrfriend does not smoke, none of her family or my family do either. I see my smoking addiction as the sad, terrible remnant of my teenage years. It is time for my inner teenager to die.

  8. #8
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    It's not smoking, but I used Skoal and other smokeless tobacco for 17 years until one day I decided I just didn't want to do it anymore. I quit cold turkey. About 2 years later a new flavor came out that sounded really good. (Copenhagen Bourbon for those inquisitive minds) so I went to the store and bought a can. One pinch and I about threw up. That is when I knew for sure I was not to ever chew again.
    I still have cravings, but I know that I don't really need it or want it. I think it's more of a boredom thing than an actual craving.

    Good Luck and just hang in there, eventually the cravings will be overcome.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by trekkie820
    I think that would work well for me, as I am the king of procrastination.
    Is that why you are putting off quitting till next month? That right there leads me to wonder about how successful you will be. Don't get me wrong, I wish you all of the luck in the world but being an ex-smoker, I know that you have to get serious about quitting. That means quitting today!

    On April 5th 1998 at about 5PM my wife and I discovered we were going to have our first child. We were so excited that we went over and sat down on the couch to light up a smoke. That is what you do when you smoke. We both had always said we would quit if we had kids. So I said, well let's just smoke this last one. My wife looked at me with a look that someone might have if they were losing grip and falling off a cliff. I knew what she was saying without her saying a word. I put the cigarette down and didn't light it. I have never lit one since. Neither has she and it will be 6 years tomorrow. I also threw out all the cigs and the lighters.


    I was a MAJOR nicotene addict. I chewed tobacco since I was very young and also chewed during all the years I smoked. I always chewed in places like church (yep) work etc. places I couldn't smoke. THen I would smoke whenever and wherever i could. I always had nictone in my body for many years.

    The thing to realize is that quitting smoking is a battle. You will have to FIGHT many, many times before you have overcome the addiction. I imagined every craving as being an enemy that I had to defeat. I would say, "you aren't going to get me. I am going to kick you azz." That is they key, handling the cravings because they are strong and as some have mentioned can occur years later although for me these cravings (yrs later) were more amazing than troubling.

    For me the first 3 months were the hardest. Everytime I got a craving I knew that I had to do something physical. I had to get up and move. Go take out the trash, paint a room etc. Yes, I nearly painted the entire house we were living in at that time. IF you just sit there and focus on the craving you will lose. Your body is somewhat pleased by the similar feeling it gets by getting your heart rate up a bit. This seems to make the craving easier to deal with. Also it helps take your mind off of it.

    Quit the smokes today! You will be so glad you did. I am so glad that I quit. For one thing I don't think we could afford it anymore it is sooooooo $$$$. JUst think of all the bike gear you could buy.

  10. #10
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    I am putting off quitting until then because it will be summer break. the stress of finals added to the cravings will make a terrible mix. I am committed to quitting, and it WILL work, it just will not work right now.

  11. #11
    1.64x10^6 posts Grendel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by trekkie820
    I am putting off quitting until then because it will be summer break. the stress of finals added to the cravings will make a terrible mix. I am committed to quitting, and it WILL work, it just will not work right now.
    Something you're going to have to learn sooner or later is how to deal with stress without smoking. The end of your finals will not be the end of stress in your life: it will always be something, whether it's school, work or family -- or just everyday annoyances that add to your desire to smoke. If you think that waiting until after finals will help you quit then by all means wait -- you have the rest of your life ahead of you (plus a few weeks gained back by quitting smoking) so you don't have to hit a particular day, just get it done soon.

  12. #12
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    I know there will be stress, but it is stress that can easily be put off. College is what i am doing to determine the rest of my life, and a nicotene craving is not something i want to deal with in the middle of a difficult test. Over the summer, the biggest stress I face will not even come close to stacking up to the stress of finals and test taking.

  13. #13
    Bike Happy DanFromDetroit's Avatar
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    You might find some of the following useful:
    • I tried the patches, but I experienced the "vivid dreams" mentioned on the side of the box. I stopped the patches after 3 days, it was just too strange.
    • I chewed alot of gum. I hate gum. I picked the worst flavors I could find: clove, licorice, extremely minty, etc. Oddly enough, the terrible taste of the gum took my mind off smoking for a few minutes. This was important in the beginning.
    • I drank quarts of water each day. I carried a quart container with me all the time. This gave me something to do and kept me feeling full so I didn't overeat.
    • Instead of smoking on my cigarette breaks, I paced the parking lot. I still had the habit of leaving my desk each hour, and I figured I should only try to break one habit at a time.
    • I really reduced my caffiene intake, before starting the "quit process". I figured I would eliminate the "triggers" first.


    Dan
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    The Cycling Photographer SipperPhoto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hair07
    this is what worked for me:

    one day, i just decided that even though i liked taking smoking breaks from work and i like smooking in bars and whatnot, i just didn't want to be a "smoker" anymroe. so i quit. i didn't throw anything away(in fact, a year later i still have a pack of marlboro menthol's in my desk b/c i'm kind of masochistic like that), didn't make any other life changes. just stopped, and didn't allow myself to smoke again. it was simply a matter of not wanting to smoke anymroe. i don't know if this works for other people. but i think if it's something you want to do, i mean really want to do, not jsut talk about and say you want to do it, you'll find a way. so, good luck finding your way, so long as it's something you really want to do.

    dan
    I used to work with a Dentist that quit like this.. apparently he had beena chain smoker for many, many years... then one day decided he wanted to quit.. left a pack of smokes on his kitchen table, saw them everyday, and never once cheated.... he told me the pack was still there, and he ahd been smokefree for 7 years... it takes willpower for sure...

    jeff
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  15. #15
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    I think i figured it out: everytime i get a craving, i will go for a quick sprint around the block/jobsite/trail. I just did about a two mile sprint through traffic on my SS road, and i don't even want a cigarette. I sat through an hour and a half of class, and now im sitting here typing this without a single craving(pack a day habit, i have one every hour). This could, no, this WILL work!!

  16. #16
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    I understand Trekkie. The best thing is to quit during a time that isn't overly stressful like exams, because you'll have a better chance of success.EVentually you have to deal with situations like stress, parties, bars, drinking, etc. For the first few weeks they suggest you avoid drinking alcohol which triggers cravings, and stay out of bars or places where people drink and smoke a lot. Coffee also causes cravings, but I managed to drink coffee while quitting, since I had long since given up having cigarettes with morning coffee. No way was I giving up EVERYTHING! However, I didn't drink any alcohol for about a month after quitting. I used the gum and it was enough to get me off the smokes. I was never able to manage it cold turkey.
    You can catch more flies with honey than with vinegar. That's great...if you want to attract vermin.

  17. #17
    Oh God, He's back! 1oldRoadie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by trekkie820
    I think i figured it out: everytime i get a craving, i will go for a quick sprint around the block/jobsite/trail. I just did about a two mile sprint through traffic on my SS road, and i don't even want a cigarette. I sat through an hour and a half of class, and now im sitting here typing this without a single craving(pack a day habit, i have one every hour). This could, no, this WILL work!!
    and if it does work today...tomorrow is the first day of the rest of your life.

    (God, I really said that didn't I? forgive me!) but dang..it's still true
    I can't ride and Frown!

  18. #18
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    I finally succeeded by getting three things in my head:

    1) Smoking is Vile
    I thought about my smoking, and about how filthy it was, and how it was controlling my life. I consciously thought about smoking as something incredibly vile and filthy...you want to feel physically nauseous as you contemplate the poisons you are ingesting.

    2) Exercise
    My bike definitely helped me to quit. I got back into cycling at the same time as I quit. This provides incredibly positive feedback, because you can literally feel yourself getting stronger each day. And, by breathing hard while riding you are cleaning out your lungs, and can feel them getting cleaner too.

    3) Admit that you are an Addict
    I had tried to quit many times, but always succumbed to the temptation to have "just one smoke". I finally had to admit to myself that I was a nicotine addict, and could not have just one...ever.

    Finally, be very careful around 1 month, 3 months, and especially 6 months. After you've proven to yourself that you can quit, you will be tempted to try "just one for old time's sake"...especially in certain scenarios (e.g., a bar).

    Best of luck...you can do it!
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  19. #19
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    I worked on breaking down the habit patterns that were associated with smoking BEFORE I gave up! I had smoked for almost 15 years and decided that I would quit on my 30th birthday (I didn't want to have been a smoker for longer than a non-smoker!).

    In the couple of months before I worked on 2 main things:

    Mental attitude - I tried to convince myself that smoking was a nasty horrible habit that I did not want to continue, rather than something I enjoyed.

    Habit breaking - I identified the times that I smoked purely out of habit and tried to then postpone smoking my next cigarette until later. For instance, I took my first cig in the morning later each day, waited longer after eating or having a coffee, tried not to smoke while waiting for a bus.

    When I gave up, I had partied quite a lot in the preceeding days (as I said, I set my 30th birthday). I had also not 100% committed to giving up until the day itself (takiong off the pressure from myself by allowing myself to not give up if that's what I truly felt like). When I woke up that morning though, I KNEW that I would not smoke again.

    As I'm a 100% or nothing kinda guy, it's been important to me that since then I have not had a single drag on a cigarette or cigar. There were a few difficult times (first time in a pub without smoking), but each time the actual internal struggle was over fairly quickly. The longer I was without a cigarette, the easier it was to ignore and the more I could convince myself that I didn't *actually* want a cigarette.

    It's almost 5 years later and I'm still cigarette free with no problems.

    Go for it! And good luck ;-)
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    Also if you screw up, just keep trying and eventually it will stick. I quit smoking a bunch of times. Only this last time has it stuck. Cycling really does help, I would consistantly come home from my rides and light one up and instantly felt like crap. I reminded myself daily of the stupidity of this. In the end I think my motivation to become a better/stronger cyclist really helped to finally kill the habit. Also the reward system can help through some of the tough times. I owe myself a really nice bike with the money that I haven't spent on cigs, unfortunately I can't seem to find the money right now.
    Last edited by MKRG; 04-06-04 at 08:49 AM.

  21. #21
    edk
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    Quote Originally Posted by trekkie820
    I know there will be stress, but it is stress that can easily be put off. College is what i am doing to determine the rest of my life, and a nicotene craving is not something i want to deal with in the middle of a difficult test. Over the summer, the biggest stress I face will not even come close to stacking up to the stress of finals and test taking.
    Your not going to quit.

    Looking back on my college days I can see why you would be thinking that way, but 20 years later (hell 2 months later) it wont mean sh*t.

    the decision you are making by not quiting now is that finals and career are more important than your health - until that changes then you will always be a smoker.

    Sorry to be so hard - I smoked, and I quit, and I smoked, and I quit, and I smoked. Finally I decided that nothing was more important that quiting smoking, 9 years ago a present to my wife and son I quit on Dec 1 -- on Dec 24 I told them had quit for good and showed them the proof of almost a month smoke free.

    you can quit... if you want to and realize it is the single most important thing you can do for your health and those around you. but while relatively ( I said relatively) trivial things like finals are more important you will ALWAYS find a reason to have a cig.

    sorry
    ed

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by edk
    Your not going to quit.
    I wasn't going to say that but I surely was thinking it. The fact is, if you ain't quittin' today, you ain't quittin' tomorrow. The nicotene is simply going to be too strong for you if you don't get any more serious than that.

    If you are a hardcore nicotence addict and you have never tried to quit, you don't even know what stress is. The finals, school etc. won't seem like stress anymore when you compare it to quitting smoking.

  23. #23
    Senior Member Ebbtide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ranger
    I wasn't going to say that but I surely was thinking it. The fact is, if you ain't quittin' today, you ain't quittin' tomorrow. The nicotene is simply going to be too strong for you if you don't get any more serious than that.

    If you are a hardcore nicotence addict and you have never tried to quit, you don't even know what stress is. The finals, school etc. won't seem like stress anymore when you compare it to quitting smoking.
    Don't believe that garbage, unless it is reverse psychology.

    Real experts will tell you the opposite, plus you know yourself better than any of us. Pick and stick to a quit date, make preparations, identify triggers, plan on spending some money on stop-gaps (nicotrol, gun, patch, etc) and stick with it. If you fail this time around you can always try another method a week later.

    Good Luck!

    ehenz

  24. #24
    Senior Member joeprim's Avatar
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    I cheated. I quit my pipe 3 years ago when I was in the hospital for a knee operation and on pain meds for 2 days. So that gave me a 2 day head start and I had some pain pills for the week I was home from work. BTW I still miss being able to stop and fill the pipe when some one asks a really dumb question.

    Joe

  25. #25
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    I AM GOING TO QUIT. You say identify triggers, and find out what barriers exist, well school is a big barrier. A trigger is taking an exam that means making or breaking my college career, as I will be doing this finals week. Do you think that i should throw away my potential because I had to quit this instant? If I wait a month, it will make my chances for success in college and in quitting that much greater. Trust me, I know what will work for my psychology and physiology.

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