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Old 12-09-08, 07:13 AM   #1
commuter33
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Training Regiment for the Winter Months

Hello everyone. I've been visiting this forum off and on for quite some time. I just recently bought a new hybrid bike this past summer and was riding it to and from work, approximately 5 miles each way. I've since stopped riding since it is so cold outside.

I would like to train in the winter so I'm not back to where I was when I first started riding this past summer. I would also like to train for longer rides that I'm planning next summer.

So I have been doing some research on indoor trainers to help me train. I was hoping someone could point me in the right direction. I have done some reading up on the different types of trainers, mags/fluid/rollers etc.

I'm so overwhelmed, I don't know where to begin. What kind of trainer should I get? How often should I ride? For how long and at what resistance?

I did read Danno's sticky post:

Winter Training: Indoor Riding & Weight-Lifting

But it doesn't really answer all my questions. What kind of training should I do for longer rides. Should I focus on spinning and increasing my max cadence? Or should I go with something that is more resistant to build muscle? I guess I would really like to get something that I can do both on.

Anyone have any suggestions on an indoor trainer that I can use with my bike that would meet my needs and suggest a simple regiment to get me started? I'm not looking for something really expensive, something practical to get the job done. I am looking to stay under $200 for just a trainer.

I would appreciate any input and help. Thanks!
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Old 12-09-08, 10:39 AM   #2
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For under $200 you can probably get a trainer that will suit your needs. I started with a CycleOps wind trainer when most of my riding consisted of a 7-mile commute each way to work. At your current activity level, I'd suggest a magnetic trainer: you can usually adjust the resistance both on the unit and on your bike; they don't make a lot of noise; they won't leak (as with some fluid trainers), and you'll have several choices in your price range.

As for a training regimen, if you're simply looking to do longer rides, then I'd suggest starting with relatively short sessions on the trainer -- say 20 minutes a few times a week with a 30-40 minute session thrown in for variety -- and gradually increase them using the 10%/week rule as a guide. If you throw in some short higher-intensity sessions once or twice a week (at this point a HRM will help), you can increase your overall speed as well. If you get serious, then you'll probably want a training reference like Joe Friel's book or cycling videos.

You don't say how long "longer" will be, but if 10 miles/day is your norm, then shooting for 30-40 mile rides next spring is easily doable. (You could even shoot for a century ride next summer, but I don't know if you're that obsessive yet. )
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Old 12-09-08, 11:54 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by palookabutt View Post
For under $200 you can probably get a trainer that will suit your needs. I started with a CycleOps wind trainer when most of my riding consisted of a 7-mile commute each way to work. At your current activity level, I'd suggest a magnetic trainer: you can usually adjust the resistance both on the unit and on your bike; they don't make a lot of noise; they won't leak (as with some fluid trainers), and you'll have several choices in your price range.

As for a training regimen, if you're simply looking to do longer rides, then I'd suggest starting with relatively short sessions on the trainer -- say 20 minutes a few times a week with a 30-40 minute session thrown in for variety -- and gradually increase them using the 10%/week rule as a guide. If you throw in some short higher-intensity sessions once or twice a week (at this point a HRM will help), you can increase your overall speed as well. If you get serious, then you'll probably want a training reference like Joe Friel's book or cycling videos.

You don't say how long "longer" will be, but if 10 miles/day is your norm, then shooting for 30-40 mile rides next spring is easily doable. (You could even shoot for a century ride next summer, but I don't know if you're that obsessive yet. )
Thanks for your reply. I have been doing some research on this website:

http://www.cptips.com/toc.htm

I will take a look at the magnetic trainers you suggested. I want something with varying degrees of resistance so I can work on increasing my cadence and get some aerobic exercise and I also want to also be able to build endurance for longer rides as well. And when I say long, there is no max really. What I would ultimately like to do is start touring. Visiting different places and biking to get a good view of the scenery so I can take it all in.

Whether that be riding 100 miles, etc. I know it will take a while for me to reach that point, I'm just having trouble getting started in that direction right now.


Still a lot of information to take in and how I use all that to get to where I want to be! I would love to be able to do a century ride by the end of next summer. That's why I'm so interested in training during the winter months to get me into shape so I'm not wasting any time.

I may check out those videos and books that you were referring to also. I guess I'm just trying to wade through all this information and figure out what I need to do!

Thanks again for your advice, hopefully I can get some more input here to get me going in the right direction. And I know it's not just about excercising and getting in shape. I know I will need to make some big changes about my diet and what I eat. People don't realize what a science biking really is, but it truly is amazing. We are the engines, if we don't get the proper fuel then we can't be as efficient as we want to be.
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Old 12-09-08, 12:17 PM   #4
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Dunno how much trainers are these days. I would recommend a fluid trainer if you can afford one. I have a magnetic trainer & it works just fine, but the fluid trainers are quieter & seem more consistent with the resistance.
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Old 12-09-08, 05:00 PM   #5
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1: Over the Winter months, it is best to work on your Aerobic conditioning and your cycling technique (about 80% of your training time)
2: Work with heart rates below Lactate/ Anaerobic threshold
3: Keep the Cadence high (around 100rpm + ), and the resistance / tension on the muscle low.
4: The other 20% of your weekly training time can take the Heart rate . Intensity above the Threshold.

Training like this will develop your Aerobic / Base fitness and teach you to become a more economical cyclist. It lays the foundation for the early spring when you can get outdoors, to be able to go for long rides without being completely out of shape.

The duration of the sessions is totally up to you.

Hope this helps.
James
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Old 12-09-08, 05:11 PM   #6
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This trainer has a good rep.
http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?c...0and%20Rollers

You have quite a few options. You can get some Spinervals, you can just pedal and watch a movie. You can get a HRM and organise your training.
Or you could simply go to a spinning class on the weekends, watch a movie and just pedal a couple days later, and do intervals midweek.
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Old 12-09-08, 07:28 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by jamescaro View Post
1: Over the Winter months, it is best to work on your Aerobic conditioning and your cycling technique (about 80% of your training time)
2: Work with heart rates below Lactate/ Anaerobic threshold
3: Keep the Cadence high (around 100rpm + ), and the resistance / tension on the muscle low.
4: The other 20% of your weekly training time can take the Heart rate . Intensity above the Threshold.

Training like this will develop your Aerobic / Base fitness and teach you to become a more economical cyclist. It lays the foundation for the early spring when you can get outdoors, to be able to go for long rides without being completely out of shape.

The duration of the sessions is totally up to you.
Thanks, this does help
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Old 12-10-08, 06:33 AM   #8
commuter33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jamescaro View Post
1: Over the Winter months, it is best to work on your Aerobic conditioning and your cycling technique (about 80% of your training time)
2: Work with heart rates below Lactate/ Anaerobic threshold
3: Keep the Cadence high (around 100rpm + ), and the resistance / tension on the muscle low.
4: The other 20% of your weekly training time can take the Heart rate . Intensity above the Threshold.

Training like this will develop your Aerobic / Base fitness and teach you to become a more economical cyclist. It lays the foundation for the early spring when you can get outdoors, to be able to go for long rides without being completely out of shape.

The duration of the sessions is totally up to you.

Hope this helps.
James
Thanks for the advice.
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Old 12-10-08, 06:34 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by late View Post
This trainer has a good rep.
http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?c...0and%20Rollers

You have quite a few options. You can get some Spinervals, you can just pedal and watch a movie. You can get a HRM and organise your training.
Or you could simply go to a spinning class on the weekends, watch a movie and just pedal a couple days later, and do intervals midweek.
Thanks for the link to the trainer. I've been looking for a decently cheap fluid trainer but I was having trouble finding some within my price range.
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