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  1. #1
    Cat 3 Meter - Don't Care fauxto nick's Avatar
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    RHR down, now it's up, give me some input.

    In August/Sept I got back on the bike after a little break due to some health issues. As soon as I got into my training schedule, nothing too intense maybe 50-60 miles a week my RHR went down to 58-65. I was taking it on my wrist and definitely could feel it was beating about 1 time a second maybe even a little slower at times. I could take it after coffee in the morning or before, it would still be low.

    In the last month or two I've noticed it has been higher, when I felt it on my wrist. I didn't make much of it until someone told me it could be a sign of over training, a few days later I ended up getting light over training. I took a week off and have gone pretty lightly recently and today I took my RHR in the morning and it's in the high 60's to low 70's, definitely a bit higher than it used to be. It's nothing that is too alarming but it definitely feels much faster these days then it did when i first started training.

    Does anyone have any idea, for other reasons I've recently cut back my coffee intake to one mug in the AM, so I doubt it's caffeine related. I just recently got a HRM and have been trying to take my RHR when I wake up in the morning but it's typically pretty bad unless you're sweating so I end up rarely getting a reading. When I do it's usually fluctuating between 65-78.

    I know this is one of those questions with a million answers but anyone with any ideas please let me know, I'm curious. I've cut my miles per week back from like 150-190 down to about 60-100 and definitely have been taking more time for recovery. One other thing is that I've been under a lot of stress in the last 2 months between work and other things, this is my guess but I'm not sure.
    Last edited by fauxto nick; 12-12-08 at 10:41 AM.

  2. #2
    umd
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    What has your weight and diet been like over the last several weeks?

    I've found that my RHR corresponds more to my metabolism than anything else.

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    Cat 3 Meter - Don't Care fauxto nick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by umd View Post
    What has your weight and diet been like over the last several weeks?

    I've found that my RHR corresponds more to my metabolism than anything else.
    I guess in the past few months I've increased my eating habbits, I eat closer to 3k+ calories a day than what i used to do was eat 2100-2300.

  4. #4
    Senior Member garysol1's Avatar
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    For your morning HR reading I find if I put some HOT tap water on the strap contacts it will read pretty quickly. The high RHR could be a sign of lack of fitness, poor sleep habits, sickness, diet......etc.....So many things

  5. #5
    umd
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    Quote Originally Posted by fauxto nick View Post
    I guess in the past few months I've increased my eating habbits, I eat closer to 3k+ calories a day than what i used to do was eat 2100-2300.
    I would bet that your metabolism is just running hotter now that you are eating more. When I wasn't eating enough my metabolism dropped to protect myself and as a result at rest my body practically shut off, and my RHR was down to the low 30s. Even through overtraining it fluctuated some, but never increased as much as it did when I started eating more and my metabolism sped back up. Even now my hr will slow down if I haven't eaten anything for a while and speed up after meals. Mid to low 40s now FWIW.

  6. #6
    Senior Member ericm979's Avatar
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    If you are taking your RHR in the morning before you get up then post-mealtime increases wouldn't affect it. I have never noticed a change in RHR from eating but I don't check RHR that often. I'll have to try that and see what it does.

    I got a cheap finger sensor Tanita for checking RHR in the morning without having to use a strap. But you can do it with your alarm clock- just wait for it the minute to change and count until it changes again. If you want to use the strap, just lick it first. Yea, I know, kinda gross.

    Stress (from the life outside cycling) will definitely raise your RHR. It sounds like that's what's going on... it is unlikely that you overreached let alone overtrained on 150-200 miles/wk and really unlikely that its still affecting you after a week off and some other weeks of under 100 miles/wk.

    Do whatever you can to fix the cause of the stress... if it is jacking your RHR that much then it's bad enough that it could really mess up your health.

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    Cat 3 Meter - Don't Care fauxto nick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ericm979 View Post
    If you are taking your RHR in the morning before you get up then post-mealtime increases wouldn't affect it. I have never noticed a change in RHR from eating but I don't check RHR that often. I'll have to try that and see what it does.

    I got a cheap finger sensor Tanita for checking RHR in the morning without having to use a strap. But you can do it with your alarm clock- just wait for it the minute to change and count until it changes again. If you want to use the strap, just lick it first. Yea, I know, kinda gross.

    Stress (from the life outside cycling) will definitely raise your RHR. It sounds like that's what's going on... it is unlikely that you overreached let alone overtrained on 150-200 miles/wk and really unlikely that its still affecting you after a week off and some other weeks of under 100 miles/wk.

    Do whatever you can to fix the cause of the stress... if it is jacking your RHR that much then it's bad enough that it could really mess up your health.
    It wasn't so much the 150-200 a week that was causing what felt like over training it was that it was back to back for 3 weeks straight with no rest on top of running and strength training.

    I never knew food intake could fluctuate your RHR, it was lowest when i was under eating now that I think of it.

  8. #8
    umd
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    Quote Originally Posted by ericm979 View Post
    If you are taking your RHR in the morning before you get up then post-mealtime increases wouldn't affect it. I have never noticed a change in RHR from eating but I don't check RHR that often. I'll have to try that and see what it does.

    I got a cheap finger sensor Tanita for checking RHR in the morning without having to use a strap. But you can do it with your alarm clock- just wait for it the minute to change and count until it changes again. If you want to use the strap, just lick it first. Yea, I know, kinda gross.

    Stress (from the life outside cycling) will definitely raise your RHR. It sounds like that's what's going on... it is unlikely that you overreached let alone overtrained on 150-200 miles/wk and really unlikely that its still affecting you after a week off and some other weeks of under 100 miles/wk.

    Do whatever you can to fix the cause of the stress... if it is jacking your RHR that much then it's bad enough that it could really mess up your health.
    What I meant was that I was undereating and my metabolism had slowed down. When I increased my diet my metabolism returned to normal and my RHR increased, not a specific after meal bump. That was a longer term effect based on overal diet, I was just illustrating the more immediate effect of timing relative to meals.

    One thing is, that you are undereating, when you wake up your metabolism will have slowed down overnight because of a large deficit. If you didn't have a deficit, say you actually ate more than you needed throughout the day, your body may still be processing that in the morning and you would not have that slump.

  9. #9
    just another gosling Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
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    First thing is always take your MRHR at the same time. Get up, pee, maybe dress, then lie down quietly for 1-3 minutes, then take your RHR with your HRM for 5 minutes, lying absolutely quietly. Do it this same way every morning, put in in a spreadsheet and graph it. That'll help keep track of things.

    The other test you can do after taking your MRHR is to get your orthostatic HR. Take your HR lying quietly as before, then stand up and stand quietly for another 3 minutes, watching your HR all the time. The difference between HRs is your orthostatic HR. If it's more than 15-20 beats, you've probably overdone it.

    Strength training is a bigger training hit than many people realize. After all, any large muscle lift will be anaerobic, so that's quite stressful. Adding running is also quite stressful since your HR will usually be higher. Do the 10% increase/week thing with everything and you'll have an easier time of it.

  10. #10
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    How's your hydration? If you are a bit dehydrated it can push your HR higher.
    Eric

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