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  1. #1
    Senior Member s4one's Avatar
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    Bean & cheese burritos

    I have been eating a lot of been and cheese burritos, mainly Baja Fresh ones, since they seems to be healthier than others.

    How good/bad are these?
    Burnt slicks

  2. #2
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    Beans can be fairly decent for you. Cheese... not so much. The killer is all the extra junk restaurants manage to pack into a burrito. Especially the tortilla. Your best bet is to make your own.
    I like bean and brown rice burritos on a reduced fat bean tortilla.

    It looks like a cheese and bean baja fresh burrito is around 900 calories. You could significantly improve these numbers making your own.
    I went to chipolte a week or two ago and picked up a vegetarian burrito. Freaking thing is about 1000 calories. Jesus. Lots of sodium and what not.

    http://www.bajafresh.com/burritos.php

  3. #3
    Senior Member City_Smasher's Avatar
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    When combined with nuts, seeds or grains, beans form a complete high-fiber vegetable protein.

    Most beans contain only 2-3% fat. Beans are the perfect food for a fat-restricted diet.
    You may never have to count calories again.

    Beans contain no cholesterol, and they can help lower your cholesterol level because they are one of the richest sources of fiber!

    Most beans contain at least 20% protein and are high in carbohydrates which provides long lasting energy.

    In addition, beans provide essential B Vitamins and Iron.


    Refried beans aren't quite as good for you, unless you choose the low fat or fat free variety.
    "You can't change the past, but you can ruin the present by worrying about the future"

  4. #4
    Senior Member s4one's Avatar
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    Humm interesting, thanks!
    Burnt slicks

  5. #5
    crazy bike girl msincredible's Avatar
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    BTW, you can order the burritos without the cheese, if you are so interested.
    Countries I've ridden in: US, Canada, Ireland, UK, Germany, Netherlands, France, China, Singapore, Malaysia
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    Senior Member Surftex363's Avatar
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    Beans CAN be good for you.

    unfortunatly, alot of beans are made with lard. therefor making them not good for you. But the vegan ones are good.

    The cheese sucks for you though.

    I suggest making your own in a microwave with whole grain tortilla, low fat mexican cheese, and vegetarian beans.
    06' Felt F80

  7. #7
    Senior Member City_Smasher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Surftex363 View Post
    Beans CAN be good for you.

    unfortunatly, alot of beans are made with lard. therefor making them not good for you.
    This is complete BS, it applies to refried beans only.
    "You can't change the past, but you can ruin the present by worrying about the future"

  8. #8
    Grizzled Curmudgeon keithm0's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by City_Smasher View Post
    This is complete BS, it applies to refried beans only.
    It's not BS. Many bean recipes (not only refried) include added animal fats.

  9. #9
    Senior Member AnthonyG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by s4one View Post
    I have been eating a lot of been and cheese burritos, mainly Baja Fresh ones, since they seems to be healthier than others.

    How good/bad are these?
    If they are made properly with fresh ingredients (not from a supermarket) and your getting enough exercise to burn them off then they are good food. Getting some fresh vegetables into your diet as well would be advisable.

    OK, I'll bite as usual

    Who has read the scientific evidence that proves that saturated/animal fats are harmful?

    Anyone?

    I'll give you a tip. It doesn't exist. It never has and it never will. See, http://www.thincs.org/Malcolm.choltheory.htm

    Anthony

  10. #10
    Grizzled Curmudgeon keithm0's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AnthonyG View Post
    If they are made properly with fresh ingredients (not from a supermarket) and your getting enough exercise to burn them off then they are good food. Getting some fresh vegetables into your diet as well would be advisable.

    OK, I'll bite as usual

    Who has read the scientific evidence that proves that saturated/animal fats are harmful?

    Anyone?

    I'll give you a tip. It doesn't exist. It never has and it never will. See, http://www.thincs.org/Malcolm.choltheory.htm

    Anthony
    Does this count?
    http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/...ct/337/21/1491

    From the abstract:

    Results Each increase of 5 percent of energy intake from saturated fat, as compared with equivalent energy intake from carbohydrates, was associated with a 17 percent increase in the risk of coronary disease (relative risk, 1.17; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.97 to 1.41; P = 0.10). As compared with equivalent energy from carbohydrates, the relative risk for a 2 percent increment in energy intake from trans unsaturated fat was 1.93 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.43 to 2.61; P<0.001); that for a 5 percent increment in energy from monounsaturated fat was 0.81 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.65 to 1.00; P = 0.05); and that for a 5 percent increment in energy from polyunsaturated fat was 0.62 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.46 to 0.85; P = 0.003). Total fat intake was not significantly related to the risk of coronary disease (for a 5 percent increase in energy from fat, the relative risk was 1.02; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.97 to 1.07; P = 0.55). We estimated that the replacement of 5 percent of energy from saturated fat with energy from unsaturated fats would reduce risk by 42 percent (95 percent confidence interval, 23 to 56; P<0.001) and that the replacement of 2 percent of energy from trans fat with energy from unhydrogenated, unsaturated fats would reduce risk by 53 percent (95 percent confidence interval, 34 to 67; P<0.001).

    Conclusions Our findings suggest that replacing saturated and trans unsaturated fats with unhydrogenated monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats is more effective in preventing coronary heart disease in women than reducing overall fat intake.

    Admittedly, that's only one study, but it was the first one that popped-up when I searched for studies on health impacts of saturated fats.

  11. #11
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    Making a batch of beans from scratch is easy.
    Soak the beans overnight.
    Boil them for a certain amount of time and simmer for an hour or so (or something like that).
    Then you have enough beans for a fair amount of time.
    Whether lard is added or not is a mute point if you make your own.

    Also, you can purchase vegetarian refried beans. I have a few cans for when I run out of beans or forget to make them.

  12. #12
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    If you are serious about riding and put decent milage in, what you eat (within reason) doesn't matter.
    You're just trying to start an argument to show how smart you are.

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    Senior Member City_Smasher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by keithm0 View Post
    It's not BS. Many bean recipes (not only refried) include added animal fats.
    Beans themselves contain no lard. If you choose to add it in a recipie.......such as refried beans, that's a different story.
    "You can't change the past, but you can ruin the present by worrying about the future"

  14. #14
    Senior Member late's Avatar
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    Auxiliary thrust...
    We are as gods, we might as well get good at it.
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  15. #15
    Killing Rabbits
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    Quote Originally Posted by keithm0 View Post
    Does this count?
    http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/...ct/337/21/1491

    From the abstract:

    Results Each increase of 5 percent of energy intake from saturated fat, as compared with equivalent energy intake from carbohydrates, was associated with a 17 percent increase in the risk of coronary disease (relative risk, 1.17; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.97 to 1.41; P = 0.10). As compared with equivalent energy from carbohydrates, the relative risk for a 2 percent increment in energy intake from trans unsaturated fat was 1.93 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.43 to 2.61; P<0.001); that for a 5 percent increment in energy from monounsaturated fat was 0.81 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.65 to 1.00; P = 0.05); and that for a 5 percent increment in energy from polyunsaturated fat was 0.62 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.46 to 0.85; P = 0.003). Total fat intake was not significantly related to the risk of coronary disease (for a 5 percent increase in energy from fat, the relative risk was 1.02; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.97 to 1.07; P = 0.55). We estimated that the replacement of 5 percent of energy from saturated fat with energy from unsaturated fats would reduce risk by 42 percent (95 percent confidence interval, 23 to 56; P<0.001) and that the replacement of 2 percent of energy from trans fat with energy from unhydrogenated, unsaturated fats would reduce risk by 53 percent (95 percent confidence interval, 34 to 67; P<0.001).

    Conclusions Our findings suggest that replacing saturated and trans unsaturated fats with unhydrogenated monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats is more effective in preventing coronary heart disease in women than reducing overall fat intake.

    Admittedly, that's only one study, but it was the first one that popped-up when I searched for studies on health impacts of saturated fats.
    Nobody should be eating trans fat.

    Sometimes saturated fats take the blame for other compounds; for example in the past it was common to clump trans fat and sat fat together. Another confounding factor is cooking method, or lack thereof. Saturated fats are better suited for frying than other more reactive oils, therefore, many fried foods contain large amounts of saturated fats. We also know that many of the negative health effects from fried or charred foods are not from the fat content but the partially oxidized biproducts like PAHs, peroxides, epoxides, etc. Unsaturated fats like olive oil are more likely to be eaten after cooking at low-temperature or raw like in a vinaigrette.


    People should also notice how the "harmless" carbohydrates are worse for you than most fats.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enthalpic View Post
    Nobody should be eating trans fat.

    Sometimes saturated fats take the blame for other compounds; for example in the past it was common to clump trans fat and sat fat together. Another confounding factor is cooking method, or lack thereof. Saturated fats are better suited for frying than other more reactive oils. Therefore, many fried foods contain large amounts of saturated fats. However, we know that many of the negative health effects from fried or charred foods are not from the fat content but the partially oxidized bi products like PAHs, peroxides, epoxides, etc. Unsaturated fats like olive oil are more likely to be eaten after cooking at low-temperature or raw like in a vinaigrette.


    People should also notice how the "harmless" carbohydrates are worse for you than most fats.
    I agree. everything is lumped together so you don't really know. since we evolved eating natural sat fats I doubt they are the biggest problem. low fat started as a media thing and was just adopted and blamed for all of our problems. but I bet it's more the low quality of food the prepared foods the additives and the chemicals. most of the food in a typical grocery store is crap.

  17. #17
    Senior Member Dubbayoo's Avatar
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    Make your own using 85% lean beef. Brown the beef then drain the fat off before you add the seasoning. Add low-fat cheese, salsa and a wheat tortilla....you're set.

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    Senior Member City_Smasher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DataJunkie View Post
    I like bean and brown rice burritos on a reduced fat bean tortilla.
    I've never heard of bean tortilla's. Sounds good, where do you get those at?
    "You can't change the past, but you can ruin the present by worrying about the future"

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    Senior Member landshark's Avatar
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    Baja Fresh Bean and Cheese Burrito:

    Link
    Last edited by landshark; 12-22-08 at 12:10 PM. Reason: Didn't see the link in the first response. D'oh!

  20. #20
    Senior Member City_Smasher's Avatar
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    ^^
    My bad, I thought bean tortilla's were a store bought tortilla.
    "You can't change the past, but you can ruin the present by worrying about the future"

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by City_Smasher View Post
    I've never heard of bean tortilla's. Sounds good, where do you get those at?
    In my imagination. My fingers were a wee bit ahead of my brain.
    Reduced fat whole wheat tortilla is what I meant. I have no idea how that turned into a bean tortilla. One wonders how that would work out.

  22. #22
    Senior Member City_Smasher's Avatar
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    I think your stomach got ahead of your fingers, lol. It sure sounded good.
    "You can't change the past, but you can ruin the present by worrying about the future"

  23. #23
    Senior Member AnthonyG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by keithm0 View Post
    Does this count?
    http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/...ct/337/21/1491

    From the abstract:

    Results Each increase of 5 percent of energy intake from saturated fat, as compared with equivalent energy intake from carbohydrates, was associated with a 17 percent increase in the risk of coronary disease (relative risk, 1.17; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.97 to 1.41; P = 0.10). As compared with equivalent energy from carbohydrates, the relative risk for a 2 percent increment in energy intake from trans unsaturated fat was 1.93 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.43 to 2.61; P<0.001); that for a 5 percent increment in energy from monounsaturated fat was 0.81 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.65 to 1.00; P = 0.05); and that for a 5 percent increment in energy from polyunsaturated fat was 0.62 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.46 to 0.85; P = 0.003). Total fat intake was not significantly related to the risk of coronary disease (for a 5 percent increase in energy from fat, the relative risk was 1.02; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.97 to 1.07; P = 0.55). We estimated that the replacement of 5 percent of energy from saturated fat with energy from unsaturated fats would reduce risk by 42 percent (95 percent confidence interval, 23 to 56; P<0.001) and that the replacement of 2 percent of energy from trans fat with energy from unhydrogenated, unsaturated fats would reduce risk by 53 percent (95 percent confidence interval, 34 to 67; P<0.001).

    Conclusions Our findings suggest that replacing saturated and trans unsaturated fats with unhydrogenated monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats is more effective in preventing coronary heart disease in women than reducing overall fat intake.

    Admittedly, that's only one study, but it was the first one that popped-up when I searched for studies on health impacts of saturated fats.

    This is an excerpt from the Nurses Health Study. This is a study that was based on nurses answering some survey questions twice a year for several years as to their diet and health. This kind of research isn't known for being the most reliable and I can't find the information on this right now but I recall that it wasn't initially assessed for saturated vs transfat consumption. Any claim that it was is simply someone going back to the data and having a guess at what was what. How they can claim that this is accurate is beyond me.

    If you go to the link I provided it talks about the Framingham study which is another famous, long term trial and it "initially" showed that the more saturated fats one consumes, the lower your cholesterol is and the healthier you are. I've since seen people claim that this study showed the opposite but this is what you get when the data is manipulated to get the desired result.

    You would think that since this saturated fat is bad theory has been around for over 50 years and its happened in a "golden age" for science that they would have come up with the hard evidence from a lab trial by now and they would say exactly what the cause and effect is but they don't and they can't. The "best" evidence they have after 50 years of trying is association from a survey based study.

    Anthony

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    Senior Member City_Smasher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by s4one View Post
    I have been eating a lot of been and cheese burritos, mainly Baja Fresh ones, since they seems to be healthier than others.

    How good/bad are these?
    It could be deadly for someone trying to draft behind you.
    "You can't change the past, but you can ruin the present by worrying about the future"

  25. #25
    Senior Member Velo Fellow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by City_Smasher View Post
    It could be deadly for someone trying to draft behind you.
    And that's why Lance gave Jan "The Look"......as in, try closing the gap on one breath, sucker.
    The aging cyclist may not get faster-- but he does get slower at slowing down.

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