Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Training & Nutrition Learn how to develop a training schedule that's good for you. What should you eat and drink on your ride? Learn everything you need to know about training and nutrition here.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 12-22-08, 06:51 AM   #1
tntyz
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
tntyz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Nabob, WI
Bikes: '03 Trek 7500, '08 Madone 4.5
Posts: 1,176
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
What's my resting HR?

This morning I put on my HR strap. turned on my Garmin 305, and lay back in back for 20 minutes. My highest recorded HR was 67 (a 2-second spike), lowest was 47 (for 30 seconds). Most of the time I was at 52.

What's considered my resting HR?
tntyz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-23-08, 08:07 AM   #2
slynkie
negligent.
 
slynkie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: White Plains, NY
Bikes: a few
Posts: 837
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by tntyz View Post
Most of the time I was at 52.
I'd go with 52.

RHR will vary based on quality of sleep, temperature, who knows what else (what you had for dinner the previous night?). Tonight, try it again, except sleep with your HR strap on, and when you wake up, have the garmin right next to you so you don't even need to sit up to turn it on. Compare.
slynkie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-23-08, 09:23 AM   #3
palesaint
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Los Alamos, NM
Bikes: 2008 fetish illustre
Posts: 890
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
In the real world, RHR is what your health care profressional measures. So, try to simulate this experience. Sometime mid-morning, do a sitting measurement and try different methods to make it as consistent as possible (regular breathing, proper posture, etc).

I can get my heartrate down to low 50s with little problem. Every time I go to the doc though, they always measure it around 59-61.
palesaint is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-23-08, 10:45 AM   #4
manos
Member
 
manos's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Bikes:
Posts: 31
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'd go with 48
manos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-23-08, 11:53 AM   #5
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004
Posts: 11,104
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 49 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by palesaint View Post
In the real world, RHR is what your health care profressional measures. So, try to simulate this experience. Sometime mid-morning, do a sitting measurement and try different methods to make it as consistent as possible (regular breathing, proper posture, etc).

I can get my heartrate down to low 50s with little problem. Every time I go to the doc though, they always measure it around 59-61.
No. What you want is your morning resting heart rate (MRHR). You want to do it exactly the same every day. Control for everything. When you go to the docs, there are hardly any controls, so that measurement is of very poor quality. It just tells the doc if you're in the "normal" zone, say between 50 and 75. Which is not your interest or purpose in taking MRHR. Your purpose there is to compare MRHR from day to day to assess training state. You're looking for the 5-7 beat raise that says "take a day or so off."

What most folks do is get up, pee (can't relax if you're holding it), then either dress and lie on the couch or go back to bed, and take RHR for 5 minutes, while thinking relaxing thoughts - image wind on quiet water for instance. Take your steady HR at the end of 5 minutes for your MRHR.
Carbonfiberboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-23-08, 01:41 PM   #6
gMoneyYo :)
Guest
 
Bikes:
Posts: n/a
Mentioned: Post(s)
Tagged: Thread(s)
Quoted: Post(s)
Finding your resting heart rate is tough. To have a low one seems to be dependent on how well you can relax. Every time I'm in the doctors office mine reads somewhere between 100 and 160; I'm frightened of clowns in white coats apparently.
I'd say (what I did at least) buy a blood pressure monitor and as soon as you wake up (without an alarm) take your HR.

Mine ended up somewhere near death, around 40 and 85/55.
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-08, 06:21 AM   #7
Barese Rider
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: central jersey coast
Bikes: 2008 Cervelo RS, 2004Trek 2100,1985 Nishike Prestige
Posts: 764
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I dont believe in "real world" testing either as the determining factor either, except for one Doctor who for some reason doesnt make me nervous my pulse and blood pressure always go up whenever soemone in white measures them.. My pulse and bp are always much less at home than at the doctors..I bought a blood pressure machine and find it helpful. I leave in it my bedroom and take pulse and bp at various points of the day.
Barese Rider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-08, 09:39 AM   #8
umd
Banned
 
umd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Santa Barbara, CA
Bikes: Specialized Tarmac SL2, Specialized Tarmac SL, Giant TCR Composite, Specialized StumpJumper Expert HT
Posts: 28,387
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Since you have a Garmin, just plug it into external power, turn off auto pause, and leave it running all night.
umd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-08, 02:26 PM   #9
Creakyknees
ride lots be safe
 
Creakyknees's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Texas
Bikes:
Posts: 5,185
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Ok I'll hijack: is resting HR really such a useful training status indicator?

I usually go by overall fatigue feeling in the legs, and general energy level throughout the day.
Creakyknees is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-08, 02:38 PM   #10
umd
Banned
 
umd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Santa Barbara, CA
Bikes: Specialized Tarmac SL2, Specialized Tarmac SL, Giant TCR Composite, Specialized StumpJumper Expert HT
Posts: 28,387
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Creakyknees View Post
Ok I'll hijack: is resting HR really such a useful training status indicator?

I usually go by overall fatigue feeling in the legs, and general energy level throughout the day.
It can be semi-useful to know what it is, or know if it is way of whack, but I stopped taking it regularly years ago as it was not consistently useful.
umd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-09, 05:19 PM   #11
Lawrence08648
Advisor
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Central New Jersey
Bikes:
Posts: 544
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Best time to find your RHR is first thing in the morning before you get up and you must not stir around. You may want to set the alarm clock for 5am, see what your HR is then, and then go back to sleep.

My resting HR is 28, both my morning HRM and when I was in the hospital's recovery room, I was relaxing connected and it told me the same thing.

A low HR shows a strong heart that is pushing a lot of blood per stroke. The more you work your cardio, the lower your HR will go but you are also genetically disposed to how low it can go.
Lawrence08648 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-09, 05:47 PM   #12
umd
Banned
 
umd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Santa Barbara, CA
Bikes: Specialized Tarmac SL2, Specialized Tarmac SL, Giant TCR Composite, Specialized StumpJumper Expert HT
Posts: 28,387
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lawrence08648 View Post
Best time to find your RHR is first thing in the morning before you get up and you must not stir around. You may want to set the alarm clock for 5am, see what your HR is then, and then go back to sleep.

My resting HR is 28, both my morning HRM and when I was in the hospital's recovery room, I was relaxing connected and it told me the same thing.

A low HR shows a strong heart that is pushing a lot of blood per stroke. The more you work your cardio, the lower your HR will go but you are also genetically disposed to how low it can go.
Well like I've said I'm way fitter now but I have a higher RHR. IMO it tells you very little in general but day-to-day variations can be somewhat interesting.
umd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-09, 07:06 PM   #13
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004
Posts: 11,104
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 49 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by umd View Post
It can be semi-useful to know what it is, or know if it is way of whack, but I stopped taking it regularly years ago as it was not consistently useful.
Also try orthostatic HR. Get your resting HR in the normal manner, then stand up while watching the monitor and record your maximum HR and standing resting HR. Write down the difference between resting and either max or standing HR. OHR can be helpful.
Carbonfiberboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:11 AM.