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Thread: LT test

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    LT test

    I want to find my LT zone using my power meter, I did it last year with my coach, but can't recall exactly what we did. I read the sticky above, but the link to the heartzone site is not working. I have searched the forums but can't find one that works with power as well as heart rate, thanks for the help.
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    LT is heart-rate-related, you sure you don't mean power output at LT?

    Power output at LT is the amount of watts you can churn out at LT, which is the higuest point of exertion that an athlete can endure w/o invoking the anaerobic energy system.

    Quickest and simplest way to find out your LT is to warm-up for 10-15 minutes at 65% of MHR, then do a couple of intervals at max for 1', with 1' recovery, then go for a 30' time trial (key being starting slow and reaching a pace you can sustain for the whole duration of the interval).

    After you are done, look at your average HR for the last 20' of that 30' interval, should be a very good approx. of your LT.

    I'm sure others will chime in with different ways but that's what I do and seems to coincide with what a lot of coaches are doing.

    If you are interested in something more power-specific, like FPT (Functional Power Treshold) then I'd recommend buying the book "Training and Racing with a Power Meter" by Hunter Allen and Andrew Coggan, excellent stuff, the next level of training a beginner / intermediate cyclist can take.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pecos View Post
    Power output at LT is the amount of watts you can churn out at LT, which is the higuest point of exertion that an athlete can endure w/o invoking the anaerobic energy system.
    Anaerobic metabolism is not not like an electric light that is off and then turned on by a switch. Energy is produced through the anaerobic system even at very low intensities.

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    For FTP (what you probably want if you use a power meter), try this link. See pages 5-6.
    http://www.peakscoachinggroup.com/Ar...ng_Chapter.pdf

    Bottom line:
    FTP is approximately 0.93 times average power over 20km TT.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by pecos View Post
    Power output at LT is the amount of watts you can churn out at LT, which is the higuest point of exertion that an athlete can endure w/o invoking the anaerobic energy system.
    That's not LT at all, and has nothing to do with it.
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    Well, I just had a LTHR test done for the first time. The results are 158 HR and 200 watts. This correlates almost perfectly with my max sustainable HR on a long (~1 hour or more) climb. So, I think if you have a place to do a long climb, do that climb as hard as you can manage without slowing down and should be pretty close to LTHR. In effect, I think this is almost the same idea as the TT test.

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