Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    Ninja cyclist Dago's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Helsinki, Finland
    Posts
    269
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    How to recover faster?

    I've been trying to get at least an hour every other day on the trainer but this doesn't feel sustainable. Feels like I am not recovered in one day of rest. After a couple times on the trainer legs feel pretty tired and its hard to do intervals because I can't pedal fast enough to get my HR up.

    I have been stretching pretty well, I usually do quick stretches (10s) before and immediately after training. and long (30s) stretches couple hours after muscles have cooled off. I also do long stretches on off-days.

    I usually drink a recovery drink after training and eat after that.

    Am I training too hard (I usually do an hour of "mixed" intervals or 1,5h of just pedaling at a steady pace (~80% of max HR)) or is there some way I could recover faster?

    I'd really like to train every other day AT LEAST (so I'd get used to riding often in the summer, riding season is not long enough ), I would have time and willingness to train more often but it's the recovery thats limiting atm.

    Actually ordered myself compression tights (Skins travel & recovery), hope those might help me a bit.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Madison, WI
    My Bikes
    83 Trek 620, 84 Raleigh Portage, 84 Schwinn Voyageur, 85 Trek 460
    Posts
    463
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Are you warming up and cooling down after your workouts? Also, how old are you? What kind of condition? How did you measure your MHR?

    I'd suggest trying a lower HR on your longer ride. Experiment with a level that allows you to come back and ride the next day. Once you train your body to get used to back-to-back exercising at lower intensity, then you can gradually increase the intensity.

    Most people need a couple of days off per week, but it does help to get your body used to doing two or three days in a row of exercise.

    Another possibility would be to lift weights on one of your days off from riding.
    Day 1 low intensity ride (70% of max)
    Day 2 lift weights
    Day 3 intervals
    Day 4 rest and recovery

    Repeat

  3. #3
    Ninja cyclist Dago's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Helsinki, Finland
    Posts
    269
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by IceNine View Post
    Are you warming up and cooling down after your workouts? Also, how old are you? What kind of condition? How did you measure your MHR?

    I'd suggest trying a lower HR on your longer ride. Experiment with a level that allows you to come back and ride the next day. Once you train your body to get used to back-to-back exercising at lower intensity, then you can gradually increase the intensity.

    Most people need a couple of days off per week, but it does help to get your body used to doing two or three days in a row of exercise.

    Another possibility would be to lift weights on one of your days off from riding.
    Day 1 low intensity ride (70% of max)
    Day 2 lift weights
    Day 3 intervals
    Day 4 rest and recovery

    Repeat
    I usually do some light pedaling for 5-10min in the start and in the end of a session to warm up. MHR is just the highest HR (206) I have hit (think it was 30s max effort). I'm 20, and not in the best condition but could be worse

  4. #4
    Senior Member Richard Cranium's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Deep in the Shawnee Forest
    My Bikes
    LeMond - Gunnar
    Posts
    2,786
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have no idea what you are asking. But off hand -it sound like you don't understand the necessity of balanced and mixed efforts. At least 30% of your training time should seem down right 'easy.'

    And no more than 30% of your training time should be downright 'hard.'

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    No Va but ride also in So Md
    My Bikes
    Cervelo SLC-SL, Guru Photon, Waterford, Specialized CX
    Posts
    8,426
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you're not recovering within 48 hours for every session, you are going too hard for your current levl of fitness.

    Until you get into better shape, cut back in bioth duration and intensity.

    1.5 hours at 80% is pretty tough. Remember time on a trainer is non-stop and you don't get the usual road "breaks" like going down hill, stop at lights, backing off, etc.
    You're just trying to start an argument to show how smart you are.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    653
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yeah, you have to give your body time to recuperate. If you don't you're just wearing yourself down instead of building yourself up. I'd cut back the hard rides to twice a week and see how it goes. Go really hard on the hard days and really easy on the easy days. If it turns out you can handle more than that, you can make another adjustment later.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    561
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Some of the best advice I've gotten was something along the lines of: "Your hard days aren't hard enough, and your easy days aren't easy enough."

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    525
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by StanSeven View Post
    If you're not recovering within 48 hours for every session, you are going too hard for your current levl of fitness.

    Until you get into better shape, cut back in bioth duration and intensity.

    1.5 hours at 80% is pretty tough. Remember time on a trainer is non-stop and you don't get the usual road "breaks" like going down hill, stop at lights, backing off, etc.
    I think you've nailed it. The best adage I've heard in 20+ years of racing and training is "all you can do is all you can do".

    In essence you're body wants to give what it can, but if you ask it for more than you can give it, then you're asking for too much, and you'll feel tired or sore or both.

    Without knowing everything about your current fitness and approach I'd say throttle back on the intensity (not volume) of your training for now. The best bang for the buck is training in the Sweet Spot, that point at which you can't hold a conversation easily, but you aren't in pain. People often think they aren't working out hard enough and push beyond their limits wt. getting the payback they are looking for.

    Try increasing the amount of sustained time you can spend in the Sweet Spot each week and over time you'll find you're able to handle more workload and your fitness will improve. If you want more detailed if on Sweet Spot training check out the following link.

    http://www.fascatcoaching.com/sweetspottraining.html

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    525
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    BTW Skins are great. I use them after a tough block of training/racing and they definitely help. Not scientific, just one person's opinion.

  10. #10
    Chieftain
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Oakland
    My Bikes
    2012 Cannondale CAADX 105; Wabi Classic Fixed Gear
    Posts
    545
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)


    Right?

  11. #11
    pedo viejo
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Northern Colorado
    My Bikes
    Specialized Allez, Salsa Pistola
    Posts
    538
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Don't forget to keep well hydrated between sessions. We all think about fluids when we're on the bike, but it's just as important off the bike. It doesn't have to be a huge amount. The age-old recommendation of 8 to 12 8oz. glasses per day works out to just 3-5 water bottles per day on top of whatever you have while on the bike.

    Someone may raise the spectre of dilutional hyponatremia, but as long as you're drinking a steady, comfortable amount all day long, it shouldn't be a problem.

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    143
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    i think you need to mix up your sessions a bit more. you should aim to do a couple of rides a week at a pace that feels guilty you are going so slow.

    may also be worth monitoring your waking heart rate before you get up each morning. over time you will be able to see if you are in need of more rest or possibly ill (indicated often be a higher heart rate).

    most of all listen to your body. if it is telling you to then back off the training. this can be done by either reducing the intensity or the total time, or a combination of both.

  13. #13
    just another gosling Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Everett, WA
    My Bikes
    CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004
    Posts
    8,081
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    If you're short of time, cut the stretches. If you can't ride almost every day comfortably, you're going much too hard. Better to ease off and get the volume up. I'll usually go hard once a week, on a long group ride, then go easy to moderate the rest of the week except for one day of doing a few intervals, but not beating myself up over it. YMMV. You could also try breaking up the boring stuff by doing pedaling exercises like fastpedal, one legged pedaling, and prolonged standing, always keeping it down in zone 2 while doing those.

  14. #14
    Senior Member WCroadie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Chester County, PA
    My Bikes
    2010 Trek Madone 5.5 CAAD9
    Posts
    2,120
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Richard and Arexjay are pretty dead on. You should not be doing intervals every session. Also, I am no expert but have been told stretching before a ride does absolutely nothing for you. But you should definitely stretch afterwards for a good 10 minutes. Also stretching hours later after the muscles have cooled is not a good idea, you should stretch after your muscles have warmed up a bit.

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    561
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yeah, I've found that active stretching before-hand and static stretching soon after a ride works best for my muscles.

    Also, maybe try a drink (or mixing your own drink) with L-Glutamine. I've noticed it helps my muscles after a hard workout or a few days of solid rides.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •