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  1. #1
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    Low Gycemic Index diet or lifestyle

    Was wondering if folks who follow low glycemic index guidelines could give some of there results and thoughts.

    I have diabetes in my family. My mother developed it before she died and my brother seems to be developing it as he approaches 50.

    Granted Im the only the member in my family who tries to take care of therself but am considering really trying to do something proactive.

    How does your cycling get affected. Pro or con?

  2. #2
    just another gosling Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
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    Eh? Have a look at this:
    http://www.ndep.nih.gov/diabetes/pubs/GP_Booklet.pdf
    The word "glycemic" does not appear in this document.

    Like it says, you want to eat a balanced diet. The most important thing I can say about that is that when you sit down to dinner, 1/2 your plate should be vegetables. Bought fresh and then prepared however you like them. Then 1/4 starch and 1/4 protein.

    I keep track and find I average 14 servings of fruits or vegetables/day. This is possible because of the tiny portions that are called "1 serving."

    OTOH, I and the type 1s I ride with don't care a fig, as it were, about glycemic index before and during rides. I don't know of any type 2s I ride with, because duh, if you ride a lot it's not an issue.

    The object of the riding game is to keep your blood sugar even, diabetic or not. The way to do that is to eat small quantities frequently while you ride. You might try not eating breakfast before a long day's ride. That helps. Don't stop and eat a big lunch. Etc. However, high glycemic index foods are the best to eat while riding. You want to have what you eat go across the stomach wall and into your cells as quickly as possible. The trick is frequent small quantities.

    When not riding, the point is to just eat a balanced diet. Michael Pollan says, "Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants." Also, don't eat anything you see advertised. I suppose milk was an exception, but carrots don't have their own website. Don't eat ingredients you wouldn't find in your kitchen.

    When I do very long rides I don't follow Pollan's advice. I eat all sorts of weird stuff. But I follow the "eat small quantities frequently" guideline.

  3. #3
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    A low-glycemic diet has proven beneficial to diabetics:
    http://www.medicinenet.com/script/ma...ticlekey=95071

    But the problem I've always seen is that it's very difficult to determine the GI value of a particular food. Searching the internet can yield different values for the same food. Values also differ by cooking method, age of the food, variety (different types of rice for example).

    I agree with the poster above, but with starches, I'd avoid things like baked potatoes, mushy pasta, white bread, etc.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by jetjock View Post
    Was wondering if folks who follow low glycemic index guidelines could give some of there results and thoughts.

    I have diabetes in my family. My mother developed it before she died and my brother seems to be developing it as he approaches 50.

    Granted Im the only the member in my family who tries to take care of therself but am considering really trying to do something proactive.

    How does your cycling get affected. Pro or con?
    My base diet is a low gycemic one. You just have to know that that is your *base* diet, and you need to modify around training. South beach is a decent place to start.

    I wrote this a while back - it might help. You might also consider carmichael's "food for fitness"...

    http://riderx.info/blogs/riderx/arch...ood-sugar.aspx
    Eric

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    Read my cycling blog at http://riderx.info/blogs/riderx
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by ericgu View Post
    My base diet is a low gycemic one. You just have to know that that is your *base* diet, and you need to modify around training. South beach is a decent place to start.

    I wrote this a while back - it might help. You might also consider carmichael's "food for fitness"...

    http://riderx.info/blogs/riderx/arch...ood-sugar.aspx
    Thanks for all of the responses. This was a great article.

  6. #6
    Killing Rabbits
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    Quote Originally Posted by ericgu View Post
    My base diet is a low gycemic one. You just have to know that that is your *base* diet, and you need to modify around training. South beach is a decent place to start.
    +1

    I try to avoid white foods (bread, rice, pasta) and eat the colored versions in moderations (whole grain bread, yams, whole wheat pasta prepared al dente, etc).

    However, when training I almost always use a sports drink instead of water. Time and place for everything.

  7. #7
    Pat
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    Regular aerobic exercise should lower your risk of developing diabetes.

    Another thing to do is to be keep your weight down. Being overweight puts one at risk for diabetes.

    A third thing to avoid are snacks unless it is things like raw carrots, brocolli, celery, avoid candy bars, a favorite snack food. Avoid "empty calories" like potato chips and crackers. Go for whole grains instead of white bread, white rice and so on.

    Also take at least annual blood screenings of your fasting blood sugar levels.

    One thing you might check is what diabetics do to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Then follow a good diabetic maintenance regime as a preventative.

    There are certain cultures that have nearly 0 levels of diabetes in the population because of the diet people have. Of course, the USA is the land of the Big Mac and diabetes & heart disease follow in the wake of that diet.

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