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Training & Nutrition Learn how to develop a training schedule that's good for you. What should you eat and drink on your ride? Learn everything you need to know about training and nutrition here.

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Old 07-28-09, 03:15 PM   #1
Auctoritas
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Optimal Split for Training? (Basic)

I'm surprised/hope this question isn't addressed in a sticky.

I can devote 3 nonconsecutive mornings a week to bicycling. My goal is stronger legs/go faster.

How am I supposed to vary the training intensity/lenth? Do I do my max everyday or go 100%,80%,50%?

Is it still ok to work legs at gym (squats) while doing this or will that lead to overtraining?

Thanks
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Old 07-28-09, 07:41 PM   #2
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A lot of cycling manuals I have seen do not answer this question well, but I can vouch for "The Heart Rate Monitor Book for Cyclists" as I recently got that (from Amazon.com). Basically the book is very well researched and well written and has diagrams and tables that are every helpful.

On page 213, which is chapter 10, there is a table that describes a 12 week program presumably for cycling novices. During week one the cycling weekly time in minutes is only 60. By the time you get to week 12, it is a weekly time of 360 min. (6 hours per week). Also the intensity is measured by the heart rate response and the resulting training zone (defined in the earlier chapters). You can monitor your heart rate by counting the pulse (stop the bike first, of course) or you can get a chest strap or other type of heart rate monitor (I would recommend that).

Often when riding, you will have involuntary stops which interfere with your workout, so you might want to arrange to do some of your training on a stationary bike or indoor trainer. That would make your training more efficient and precise.

The book also describes how to measure your current fitness level with self testing at maximal exertion. You can use the test also to measure your fitness improvements.

Your second question about squats and other gym workouts, could have more than one right answer but I am planning to continue doing squats at the gym but increase weight slowly and not aim for 300 lb squats or anything like that. If in doubt I'll deload or reduce the reps or the days per week doing them. Have a trainer check your form to be sure you aren't putting your knees at risk (not to mention your back) and hopefully others on the forum will put in their 2 cents worth too.
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Old 07-30-09, 12:47 PM   #3
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Thanks, great advice. Would appreciate more input though.
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Old 07-30-09, 12:57 PM   #4
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"stronger legs/go faster" is not a specific goal. What are you training for? Criterium races, road races, century rides?
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Old 07-30-09, 01:53 PM   #5
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The six day a week plan I am following has only one above pace ride, and one easy ride. The other four rides are at pace, meaning the expected pace of the event for which you are training. Of course, the mileage varies, and gradually increases. Since you would have four days off, I would not do an easy/recovery ride. Two at pace, and one day of over pace or intervals, would be my choice.

My training plan says not to weight train. But, if I was only riding three days, I think one day at the gym would be o.k., followed by a day off before riding again.

From what I've read, increasing distance too fast, or riding too hard, too often is the quickest way to overtraining. The rule is, to increase riding distance by only 10% each week.

edit-p.s. Core training, like crunches, might do more to make you faster than squats. You also want to focus on spinning fast with your legs, rather than grinding hard, to go faster, and avoid injury.
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Last edited by chewybrian; 07-30-09 at 01:58 PM.
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Old 07-30-09, 02:11 PM   #6
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In my experience, weight training takes 3 or 4 days to fully recover vs. intervals or hard rides which is 1-3 for me. Therefore weight training in the middle of race season is not so great, but during the winter it's awesome when you don't want to ride 3 hours in the rain/cold.

And core work is never to be neglected if you are doing heavy weight/low reps for squats, lunges etc.
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