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  1. #1
    Senior Member DX Rider's Avatar
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    Doesn't it seem like the road to obesity keeps getting flatter?

    Has anyone else noticed these new fast food commericals?

    1.) McDonalds just introduced a 1/3 pounder hamburger.
    2.) Taco Bell just introduced a one pound burrito. Which looks gross as hell.
    3.) Pizza hut just released a new stuffed crust pizza, because pizza needs more cheese. That "jackpot" commercial makes me want to put a bullet through the screen.
    4.) Olive Garden and there "never ending pasta bowl". More like never ending calorie count. I think Olive Garden is to Italian food, what X-mart is to the biking industry.

    Luckily, I avoid all of those places if I can help it. I couldn't tell you the last time I ate McDonalds or Pizza Hut. I haven't had Burger King since March, when I dumped my girlfriend. My daughter has a chicken fry addiction, thanks to my lazy ex. Although the way she says "chicken fry!" is really cute.

    I did have a couple of the light tacos with chicken (lettuce, tomatoes, and chicken) at Taco Bell recently. I had made the mistake of not eating before riding and I had also planned on stopping at the supermarket to pick up some fresh produce to munch on during the ride. Than I was going so good that I kept riding past store along my route.

    I wound up being so hungry after fifty miles that I had to have something to eat immediately. The protein from the chicken made me feel much better though.I did still go to the grocery store next door to pickup some clif bars and an orange to eat on the rest of the ride.
    Quote Originally Posted by stronglight View Post
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  2. #2
    squid
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    Who cares what fast food chains are trying to push? I don't know much about dieting, but i was under the impression that rule 1 for any weight loss plan is don't eat fast food.

  3. #3
    Raleigh Superbe miles.lowry's Avatar
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    Ya'but the ads make it all look soooooo good. (except Taco Hell)

  4. #4
    carbureted legs
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    elastic pants included in your order? Jackpot!

  5. #5
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    Not to turn this political, but it's interesting to think about...

    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/10/op...=4&ref=opinion

  6. #6
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    Cancel your cable TV, go out and ride. Problem solved.
    ...

  7. #7
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
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    Meanwhile, here in Australia, it's tough to find a fast food place. They do exist in the cities, but not so much in the smaller towns.

    Last night, for example, it would have been so convenient to pop into a fast food place of some sort to pick up supper ... but there were none within about 100 km of where we were.

    And the government is talking about banning fast food ads during certain times on the TV.

  8. #8
    Bicycle n00B
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    Your attention to the advertising is duly noted. Since you've avoided wearing your tin-foil hat, we now have your location and will arrive soon.

    I reserve the right to be wrong at any time. :D

    Man does not live by bread alone, that's why God made ice cream.

  9. #9
    ..... Jynx's Avatar
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    I haven't eaten fast food in years but there are so many places by me. On one road it goes McDonalds, Burger King, Taco Bell and across the street is Wendy's. All within a couple hundred feet. But even worse then those places is FatBurger. They have a "Triple King Challenge". Way worse than anything I have ever seen.



    plus you can add whatever you want to it on top of what it comes with (like 3 more patties, bacon, and cheese)




  10. #10
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    I eat fast food every so often. It's not like eating a combo meal will instantaneously turn you into a 500 lb behemoth. Everything in moderation (especially fast food).

  11. #11
    Each Drop of Sweat Counts
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    I hate that commercial where the three guys are in the food court and two of them start busting the chops of the guy with the Subway sandwich and are talking about how smart they are for buying some KFC meal.

    To me the message is "you can get a ton of food for the same price as something healthy".

    Give me the Subway every time.

    John

  12. #12
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    Subway is good. The worst one is Carl's Junior. All you hear is the sound of the person chewing... loudly.

  13. #13
    Beardo
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaybird79 View Post
    Not to turn this political, but it's interesting to think about...

    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/10/op...=4&ref=opinion
    Prompted me for log in - is this where commie news network was discussing banning fast food joints?


    To OP: Pizza Hut has had stuffed crust for 20 years, if not longer. They're pretty good, what's wrong with cheese anyway?
    -Tony

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  14. #14
    umd
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    Quote Originally Posted by DataJunkie View Post
    Subway is good. The worst one is Carl's Junior. All you hear is the sound of the person chewing... loudly.
    I like subway for road trip food. Reasonably healthy, satisfying, and consistent. When you are rolling through some podunk town and your choices are between subway, the greasy spoon diner, or not eating for another several hours, I'll take subway. Had it for lunch today, actually

  15. #15
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    I too eat fast food every once in a while. Everything in moderation as they say. I don't care for burger king/macdonalds though, i'd be more likely to buy myself fish and chips or possibly a chinese. Eating it every now and again reminds me why I don't eat it Plus I think a bit of "poison" is good for your body - remind it how to deal with some crap instead of healthy stuff all the time.
    Elite XC turned Cat1 Road Cyclist

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  16. #16
    811ORV
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    They use gmo products for essentially every single item on the menu, ontop of that the food is so heavily processed its not even really considered food anymore imo. We're supposed to eat food to live not live to eat food, so why would you ever consider eating what essentially is a piece of cardboard covered in spices?

    What really gets me mad tho is the fact so many people support these *******, essentially making it possible for them to sell there food cheaper then anything else available. Most people would rather buy that $1 double cheeseburger then get a couple pieces of fruit for a dollar...

  17. #17
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    Social engineering/uninformative glamorizing advertising that takes advantage of an uneducated free market is why we have what we have: Millions of people who look at someone who is active and say "I cant do that," then look at wholesome food and think, "That won't be tasty." because images of smiling families haven't been associated with said foods (via repeated forced viewings of commercials featuring said families under the holy light of whichever logo represents the pusher of monochromatic starch and fried meat product.)
    Most people, when looking at it logically, are brainwashed into eating what is essentially reheated conveyor belt feces because of the images they have witnessed since birth depicting people becoming spiritually satisfied upon ingestion. If you had an image of a mother and daughter smiling and laughing at each other under afternoon sunlight in an emerald green park while eating broccoli pounded into your eye sockets day after day since you were 3, do you think you would reach for broccoli a little more often? I think so.
    I hate fast food so much. I hate what it stands for in culinary contexts. I hate what it stands for nutritionally, I hate what it stands for philosophically. It's killing more than us, in the long run.
    I think the people responsible for the state of the food industry want us to be sick. They want us to die. It is eugenics.

  18. #18
    Senior Member
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    I could care less what their advertising or what other people are deciding to eat.

    I haven't eaten fast food in 4-5+ years. I do cheat once per week on pizza.

    What does bother me is that I'll be paying for their healthcare.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by tonski View Post
    Prompted me for log in - is this where commie news network was discussing banning fast food joints?


    To OP: Pizza Hut has had stuffed crust for 20 years, if not longer. They're pretty good, what's wrong with cheese anyway?
    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/10/op...=3&ref=opinion

    TO listen to President Obama’s speech on Wednesday night, or to just about anyone else in the health care debate, you would think that the biggest problem with health care in America is the system itself — perverse incentives, inefficiencies, unnecessary tests and procedures, lack of competition, and greed.

    No one disputes that the $2.3 trillion we devote to the health care industry is often spent unwisely, but the fact that the United States spends twice as much per person as most European countries on health care can be substantially explained, as a study released last month says, by our being fatter. Even the most efficient health care system that the administration could hope to devise would still confront a rising tide of chronic disease linked to diet.

    That’s why our success in bringing health care costs under control ultimately depends on whether Washington can summon the political will to take on and reform a second, even more powerful industry: the food industry.

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, three-quarters of health care spending now goes to treat “preventable chronic diseases.” Not all of these diseases are linked to diet — there’s smoking, for instance — but many, if not most, of them are.

    We’re spending $147 billion to treat obesity, $116 billion to treat diabetes, and hundreds of billions more to treat cardiovascular disease and the many types of cancer that have been linked to the so-called Western diet. One recent study estimated that 30 percent of the increase in health care spending over the past 20 years could be attributed to the soaring rate of obesity, a condition that now accounts for nearly a tenth of all spending on health care.

    The American way of eating has become the elephant in the room in the debate over health care. The president has made a few notable allusions to it, and, by planting her vegetable garden on the South Lawn, Michelle Obama has tried to focus our attention on it. Just last month, Mr. Obama talked about putting a farmers’ market in front of the White House, and building new distribution networks to connect local farmers to public schools so that student lunches might offer more fresh produce and fewer Tater Tots. He’s even floated the idea of taxing soda.

    But so far, food system reform has not figured in the national conversation about health care reform. And so the government is poised to go on encouraging America’s fast-food diet with its farm policies even as it takes on added responsibilities for covering the medical costs of that diet. To put it more bluntly, the government is putting itself in the uncomfortable position of subsidizing both the costs of treating Type 2 diabetes and the consumption of high-fructose corn syrup.

    Why the disconnect? Probably because reforming the food system is politically even more difficult than reforming the health care system. At least in the health care battle, the administration can count some powerful corporate interests on its side — like the large segment of the Fortune 500 that has concluded the current system is unsustainable.

    That is hardly the case when it comes to challenging agribusiness. Cheap food is going to be popular as long as the social and environmental costs of that food are charged to the future. There’s lots of money to be made selling fast food and then treating the diseases that fast food causes. One of the leading products of the American food industry has become patients for the American health care industry.

    The market for prescription drugs and medical devices to manage Type 2 diabetes, which the Centers for Disease Control estimates will afflict one in three Americans born after 2000, is one of the brighter spots in the American economy. As things stand, the health care industry finds it more profitable to treat chronic diseases than to prevent them. There’s more money in amputating the limbs of diabetics than in counseling them on diet and exercise.

    As for the insurers, you would think preventing chronic diseases would be good business, but, at least under the current rules, it’s much better business simply to keep patients at risk for chronic disease out of your pool of customers, whether through lifetime caps on coverage or rules against pre-existing conditions or by figuring out ways to toss patients overboard when they become ill.

    But these rules may well be about to change — and, when it comes to reforming the American diet and food system, that step alone could be a game changer. Even under the weaker versions of health care reform now on offer, health insurers would be required to take everyone at the same rates, provide a standard level of coverage and keep people on their rolls regardless of their health. Terms like “pre-existing conditions” and “underwriting” would vanish from the health insurance rulebook — and, when they do, the relationship between the health insurance industry and the food industry will undergo a sea change.

    The moment these new rules take effect, health insurance companies will promptly discover they have a powerful interest in reducing rates of obesity and chronic diseases linked to diet. A patient with Type 2 diabetes incurs additional health care costs of more than $6,600 a year; over a lifetime, that can come to more than $400,000. Insurers will quickly figure out that every case of Type 2 diabetes they can prevent adds $400,000 to their bottom line. Suddenly, every can of soda or Happy Meal or chicken nugget on a school lunch menu will look like a threat to future profits.

    When health insurers can no longer evade much of the cost of treating the collateral damage of the American diet, the movement to reform the food system — everything from farm policy to food marketing and school lunches — will acquire a powerful and wealthy ally, something it hasn’t really ever had before.

    AGRIBUSINESS dominates the agriculture committees of Congress, and has swatted away most efforts at reform. But what happens when the health insurance industry realizes that our system of farm subsidies makes junk food cheap, and fresh produce dear, and thus contributes to obesity and Type 2 diabetes? It will promptly get involved in the fight over the farm bill — which is to say, the industry will begin buying seats on those agriculture committees and demanding that the next bill be written with the interests of the public health more firmly in mind.

    In the same way much of the health insurance industry threw its weight behind the campaign against smoking, we can expect it to support, and perhaps even help pay for, public education efforts like New York City’s bold new ad campaign against drinking soda. At the moment, a federal campaign to discourage the consumption of sweetened soft drinks is a political nonstarter, but few things could do more to slow the rise of Type 2 diabetes among adolescents than to reduce their soda consumption, which represents 15 percent of their caloric intake.

    That’s why it’s easy to imagine the industry throwing its weight behind a soda tax. School lunch reform would become its cause, too, and in time the industry would come to see that the development of regional food systems, which make fresh produce more available and reduce dependence on heavily processed food from far away, could help prevent chronic disease and reduce their costs.

    Recently a team of designers from M.I.T. and Columbia was asked by the foundation of the insurer UnitedHealthcare to develop an innovative systems approach to tackling childhood obesity in America. Their conclusion surprised the designers as much as their sponsor: they determined that promoting the concept of a “foodshed” — a diversified, regional food economy — could be the key to improving the American diet.

    All of which suggests that passing a health care reform bill, no matter how ambitious, is only the first step in solving our health care crisis. To keep from bankrupting ourselves, we will then have to get to work on improving our health — which means going to work on the American way of eating.

    But even if we get a health care bill that does little more than require insurers to cover everyone on the same basis, it could put us on that course.

    For it will force the industry, and the government, to take a good hard look at the elephant in the room and galvanize a movement to slim it down.
    Last edited by jaybird79; 09-12-09 at 07:05 PM. Reason: new link

  20. #20
    RacingBear UmneyDurak's Avatar
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    At least they post their nutritional information. I think IHOP is the worst. Their slogan should be "Come Hungry. Leave with a coronary." Most of their entries have enough calories for breakfast, lunch and dinner.

    UD
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  21. #21
    Senior Member td.tony's Avatar
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    Last night I had a big mac meal at 12am. This morning I did a crit race at 8:30am. Afterwards I had a large sirloin steak burger meal from Jack in the Box. And for dinner just now I had a philly cheese steak. I haven't eaten fast food in 4 months but that first bite into that big mac last night might as well have been crack, because my body is craving it more than ever now...


    EDIT: I just found out the sirloin steak cheeseburger has about 1,000 calories by itself. Not to even mention the large order of french fries

  22. #22
    811ORV
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    Jaybird your post reminded of a great concept i was reading about a couple days ago. This book, http://www.amazon.com/What-Medicine-...2844985&sr=8-8 , explains how if modern medicine ceased to exist tomorrow we would be better off. With that said obama's health care plan can suck my sweaty balls, just another way that bastard can swindle my cash


    Heres another interesting article about the fallacies of modern medicine http://chestofbooks.com/health/natur...nfessions.html

  23. #23
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    I stopped drinking soda and staying away from fast food as much as possible. Last night I had some nuggets and a small soda and felt like crap the rest of the night,funny how quick ones body changes. Almost afraid to admit I work in a warehouse which services fast food places.

  24. #24
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    I stopped at McD's for the first time in absolutely ages. Finished a century without anything substantial (4 gels, 1 granola bar). There was nothing solid to eat along the way (SAG stops). Nothing afterwards either. Only place I could find was McD's. Went with Grilled chicken, FWIW.

    The comment about processed food nailed it. Most of the food in the US is so processed there is little to no nutrient value. A fellow teacher, originally from England, loses 10 pounds when she returns (to England) to visit. No changes in activity or even diet. It is the quality of the food she consumes that makes the difference.

    Read up on the GAPS diet. Simply amazing. I have watched it cure an extremely autistic girl. If only I could enjoy being in the kitchen to do enough cooking!

  25. #25
    One legged rider
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    the problem is these companies are massive, insanely powerful corporations who have so much lobbying power that any attempt to regulate their advertising and things like that get stomped down right away. Its shameful but such is the power of the free market mated with a representative government.
    What really bothers me a lot though is these people who are really really obese and continue to eat that stuff.
    My wife is pregnant and was craving Wing Stop. I ate it too and now I feel like, depressed and kind of sick.

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