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Old 02-20-10, 12:57 PM   #1
RiPHRaPH
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Max HR on trainer

I've been indoors (midwest weather) and twice a week i do intervals that include 3 X 3 minutes at all out after 1/2 hour of zone 2. My usual max HR is 185 (I am 45, 185 lbs)

I can't seem to get my max HR up past 178 or so. Do I

>keep doing them till the season officially begins?
>not worry about it, training is training. The numbers will take care of themselves
>max HR is down on the long list of numbers I should be worried about
>explore options now to fix it.


discuss.
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Old 02-21-10, 12:51 AM   #2
tadawdy
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My answer would lie in whether you're putting out the same amount of power, but at a lower hr. That would mean you're getting fitter or more efficient.

If you're putting out less power along with the lower hr, I'd consider why. For me, it usually just means I'm sick of the trainer. But, you could be overtrained. How's your hr outside, when compared to usual? My hr is much easier to raise outdoors. Motivation makes a difference.

Another thing to consider: have you changed your gearing during for the intervals? My experience has been that after doing intervals for a while, and getting better at them, my freely-chosen cadence has actually dropped (even as my power output has increased). Typically, people find that producing the same power with a lower cadence leads to a decreased hr, but more muscular fatigue. As you get better at the intervals, you should become more able to tolerate localized fatigue. Hence, a bigger gear may feel fine, but the hr response may not be there. This is what I've experienced lately.

So, if you have dropped your cadence a bit, making sure your cadence is consistent (i.e. using a smaller gear for the same power output) might help you get your hr where you want it.

Personally, I'm just going to do whatever keeps improving my power at threshold.

Last edited by tadawdy; 02-21-10 at 12:54 AM.
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Old 02-21-10, 02:46 PM   #3
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I would forget about your HR and increase the number of intervals to 6-8. Try to do them at a constant power rather than going all out. If you go all out you won't be able to maintain power throughout the interval. Figure out your FTP as best as possible and do the intervals at 106-120% of FTP. You could also try extending them beyond 3 minutes.
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Old 02-21-10, 03:57 PM   #4
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I completely understand about 'ramping up' to the maxHR rather than going from zone 2 to the top end right away. I will definitely try that good idea "gregf83"

I am even wearing my Canucks throwback hat although we all know who will hoist Lord Stanley's Cup this year!! It is, of course the Indian Head on the sweater.
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Old 02-24-10, 06:23 PM   #5
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The max HR you see on the road definitely might not match the max HR you can sustain on a trainer. Being outdoors, with the wind in your face and the anticipation of an approaching hill can get your heart going more than dingy grey walls, staring at a small television while some shmuck yells at you to push harder. That's just the facts.

MHR efforts just aren't productive on a trainer. The best workouts on trainers are nice steady state efforts at a good clip. An example of a good hour workout is: 5 min warmup, with 3 10 minute LT efforts (5 min rest between) and maybe 5 minutes of high RPM spinning at the end. I managed a 2:10 effort on the trainer and did nothing but 20 minute blocks of 160-170bpm intervals with 5 minute 140-150bpm breaks. Sure felt good... when it was over.
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