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Old 04-01-10, 05:17 PM   #1
pedalhard
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Heart rate monitor numbers

Cannot firgure out what the recovery numbers on my heart rate monitor mean, I think a higher number is better but why? What actually is this measuring? Is it your starting heart rate then your finishing one and then showing the number inbetween? Thanks for any help on this.
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Old 04-01-10, 05:25 PM   #2
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You'll probably have better luck reading the manual than hoping someone on BF knows what type of HRM you have and how it works.
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Old 04-01-10, 06:29 PM   #3
pedalhard
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You'll probably have better luck reading the manual than hoping someone on BF knows what type of HRM you have and how it works.
The manual does not give any details other than it's better to have a higher number and it's a timex Ironman.
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Old 04-01-10, 06:40 PM   #4
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I just got the ironman road trainer myself a couple weeks ago. I to am having a bit of trouble understanding all the data. I really like this piece of equipment, but I would like a step by step or at least a program to run through to help understand it. I know your recovery time is important as far as a fitness metric goes, just not sure how to decipher it from this hrm. Note: this is my very first hrm.
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Old 04-01-10, 07:49 PM   #5
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I have an older Ironman and according to my manual you can select a one or two minute period to measure how quickly your HR declines after a hard effort. Once you are finished your effort you press the start button and after 1 or 2 minutes it will disply your HR along with the starting HR. The difference is your recovery. I've never used the function as I have a recorder and can look at it later if I want.
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Old 04-02-10, 12:45 PM   #6
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You actually want the number to return quite quickly to your resting HR.
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Old 04-02-10, 02:31 PM   #7
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It's probably just some kind of "score". The number itself won't mean anything. Polar has something similar, called OwnIndex IIRC. Don't worry about the number, but track it for improvements if you care.
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Old 04-02-10, 03:39 PM   #8
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It's probably just some kind of "score". The number itself won't mean anything. Polar has something similar, called OwnIndex IIRC. Don't worry about the number, but track it for improvements if you care.
Yes this I understand , but what is meant by improvement? Actually I tend to overtrain and had read that using this number can let me know when I need a rest day[no I never listen to my body I am hard headed] so it's still unclear as to what this nuber means ? is lower or higher better. Is it how quickly you return to your resting heart rate?
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Old 04-02-10, 09:27 PM   #9
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I have a different Timex HRM, but this info should be in the manual for your HRM.

The number is the number of beats per minute that your heart has slowed in the 1 (or 2) minutes since the end of exercise (or more precisely - since the stop button on the monitor was pressed).

So the higher the number the better. The faster that you recover, the better. As you become fitter, you will recover faster. What you should do is find what is 'normal' for you. Then if there comes a time when that number is significantly lower than normal it's an indication that you are not recovering as well as normal and you might be over-training.



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Yes this I understand , but what is meant by improvement? Actually I tend to overtrain and had read that using this number can let me know when I need a rest day[no I never listen to my body I am hard headed] so it's still unclear as to what this nuber means ? is lower or higher better. Is it how quickly you return to your resting heart rate?
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Old 04-03-10, 03:13 PM   #10
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Thanks ^ I just found and read the book younger next year and , yes that's what the numbers mean, also realized that I need to stop the monitor before I start the cool down part of my ride this I was not doing so when I stopped it , it would show no recovery or a low number. The book said anything over 20 is good.
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Old 04-06-10, 02:47 PM   #11
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One of the symptoms of overtraining can be a elevated resting pulse rate. This is actually a pretty good indicator. So, knowing your resting pulse is helpful as a baseline.
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Old 04-07-10, 09:16 PM   #12
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Yes this I understand , but what is meant by improvement? Actually I tend to overtrain and had read that using this number can let me know when I need a rest day[no I never listen to my body I am hard headed] so it's still unclear as to what this nuber means ? is lower or higher better. Is it how quickly you return to your resting heart rate?
The higher the number the better. So it's a hard effort number minus your HR after some short period. Therefore, the lower the high number and the higher the low number, the smaller their difference will be, right?

The two most noticeable symptoms of overtraining are (1) that your HR doesn't get as high with effort, and (2) that your resting HR becomes elevated. Thus a shrinking number will mean that you are getting tired and need a rest. So you want to look at the trends in this number, and not so much its absolute value.

My Polar has a similar test, where you measure your resting and standing heart rate and note the difference between them.
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