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Old 04-26-10, 10:44 PM   #1
sheeepdot
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Can anyone else not breathe through their nose?

Allergies, nasal pollops, etc. etc. and I can't breath through my nose. It's always been like this, so I'm more or less used to it, but it has also always limited my endurance. My chest/lung muscles give out way before my legs do, and I'll end up taking very shallow quick breaths.

I've been running as well as riding this year, and that is helping tremendously. Just wondering if anyone else has any thoughts on, well, breathing.

I'm not looking for cures, trust me I've tried them all, just wondering if anyone's got any hints or tips.

-O
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Old 04-26-10, 10:54 PM   #2
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Open your mouth fairly wide, straighten your airway, drop your tongue and breathe the air. Forget your nose. Your nose is to smell with. When you breathe in, push your belly out first, so you look pregnant, then expand your chest from the bottom up. No special instructions for breathing out. Always breathe like this when you're riding hard or running. Do it consciously. Maintain that breathing pattern until you really have to breathe faster, but still try to breathe deeply as possible.
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Old 04-26-10, 11:33 PM   #3
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Yep, can't breathe through my nose whenever I ride, and the mucus responsible for it also gets in my main airway, which is on the narrow side to begin with. Therefore I can start panting before my legs give out. I try to keep my exertion below that particular threshold, but that means I am rather slow up long climbs, which effectively limits what type of rides I can do. Anything with a lot of climbing will just take too damn long because of the pace I have to keep on climbs.
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Old 04-27-10, 01:46 AM   #4
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If mucus is an issue then you should try cutting dairy products from your diet.
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Old 04-27-10, 07:20 AM   #5
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http://www.ehow.com/about_5082104_mu...ing-foods.html

Eating some foods seem to trigger excess mucus production. It sounds like you have an food allergy & its blocking your lungs. If your constantly feeding the problem, over the counter products at the pharmacy aren't much help.

I know for a fact pineapple is fantastic for clearing excess mucus from the throat & lungs having consumed it on a empty stomach before riding.

Even if pineapple does work out, you still need to find the root cause which is almost certain to be connected to diet.


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Mucus is a problem that ails many people. From the common cold to asthma, mucus presents a problem because it constricts the airways. Chronic sinusitis produces snoring, coughing, hacking and both stuffy and runny noses. There are natural ways to prevent or even eliminate the problem, all through the consumption of proper foods.

What is Mucus?

According to SinusWars.com, (see References), mucus is a thick fluid secreted by various cells that line body organs. The thick fluid is made up of water, salt, mucin and other small cells. Mucus is important because it keeps the body from drying out. Normal mucus is clear. The problem occurs when thicker, excess mucus does not allow the sinuses to drain properly. In addition, when mucus turns another color other than clear, an infection is present. When irritants such as mold, smoke or pet dander are inhaled, they become trapped in the mucus.

The Food Connection

Foods have a direct impact on the sinuses and mucus. Dairy foods increase mucus production while fresh fruits and vegetables aid in the elimination. Drinking teas can also aid in the elimination of excess mucus. The temperature of consumed foods can also make a big difference. Cold foods constrict the passageways, while warmed foods thin and open airways. Thinning the mucus makes elimination possible.


A Perfect Fruit for Sufferers

Fresh pineapples remove mucus from the body
Pineapple is a boon to asthmatics and sinus sufferers. The key element in pineapple is the bromelain. Bromelain is a proteolytic enzyme that breaks down proteins. It can aid the body heal from bronchitis and pneumonia as well. Fresh pineapple properties also act as anti-inflammatory agents, which can also reduce the swelling in air passages, making breathing easier and aiding in elimination.


Other Mucus-Relief Fruits

Vitamin C can lessen or halt a cold
Other fruits, while not containing bromelain, have vitamin C properties. Vitamin C in adequate dosages can prevent or lessen the effects of a cold. All citrus fruits are natural boons to allergy and cold sufferers. Grapefruit in particular reduces salt in the body and will speed elimination of thick mucus and swelling, as it is also a natural anti-inflammatory. Other vitamin C bonanzas are lemons, limes and oranges. Try squeezing a slice of these natural mucus warriors into every glass of water. Fresh lemons squeezed into hot water will loosen phlegm. Fresh watermelon juice is effective at reducing toxins and symptoms.


Vegetables

Fresh vegetables should be a mainstay in a healthy diet.
Vegetables provide a wonderful defense against mucus and nasal allergies. Unlike other over-processed foods, fresh veggies abound in sinus-friendly dietetic choices. A steaming vegetable soup filled with fresh vegetables can significantly make the mucus move along and dissolve. Some vegetables with powerful elimination properties are asparagus, onions, cauliflower, celery and garlic. Fresh green vegetables are better immunity boosters, as they contain chlorophyll. Fruits do not contain this powerful antioxidant.


Warm and Spicy

Spicy foods help thin mucus.
Heat dissolves mucus. Warm pureed soups of vegetables are a delicious and soothing way to remove mucus from the body. Turn up the heat with spices like garlic and pepper. The lungs lie just above the digestive track and the heat of these will aid in elimination. Another aid is ginger and a pinch of it in a daily diet may chase the mucus away. Reduce sugars and salts as seasonings as these increase mucus production. Season foods with herbs and spices. Herbal teas aid as well.


Foods to Avoid


Concentrate on fresh fruits and vegetables. The main food group to avoid during a bout of sinusitis is dairy. Removing milk during this time can slow down mucus production. Cheese and yogurt should be avoided as well. Stick to whole grain breads and avoid refined sugars in white flour and bread. Chocolate, with its high concentration of refined sugars, should be avoided as well. Yeast products should not be a part of the diet during a cold. Instead, focus on lightly steamed fresh vegetables, whole-grain rice and fresh fruit. Canned vegetables and fruit are cooked during processing, losing much of the nutritive value. Canned foods uses salt as a primary preservative--fresh is better.

Last edited by $ick3nin.vend3t; 04-27-10 at 07:35 AM.
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Old 04-27-10, 07:22 AM   #6
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If mucus is an issue then you should try cutting dairy products from your diet.
If mucus is an issue then you should try cutting dairy products from your diet.
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Old 04-27-10, 11:10 AM   #7
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Well, let me give a little background. As far back as I can remember, I have woken up congested and nauseated from the post-nasal drip. This clears up in 1-2 hours on a day that I don't ride. When I do ride, if its an easy recovery ride, I don't produce much mucus. If I am working hard, the faucets are at full throttle and I am constantly wiping my nose no matter what the temperature.
I just recently added regular dairy back into my diet a couple of weeks ago, and I have noticed no appreciable difference in the amount of mucus I have, so while things do point to a food allergy, I am not sure it is dairy causing it.
I will definitely try pineapple though, and see if that at least thins things out.
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Old 04-27-10, 11:53 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deep_sky View Post
Well, let me give a little background. As far back as I can remember, I have woken up congested and nauseated from the post-nasal drip. This clears up in 1-2 hours on a day that I don't ride. When I do ride, if its an easy recovery ride, I don't produce much mucus. If I am working hard, the faucets are at full throttle and I am constantly wiping my nose no matter what the temperature.
I just recently added regular dairy back into my diet a couple of weeks ago, and I have noticed no appreciable difference in the amount of mucus I have, so while things do point to a food allergy, I am not sure it is dairy causing it.
I will definitely try pineapple though, and see if that at least thins things out.
For most folks, dairy makes no difference. You already gave it a try. Now it's time to go full medical on the problem. The simplest and easiest thing is to use cheap over-the-counter meds. Take 25mg of diphenhydramine hydrochloride at bedtime. That should help the nighttime issue. Before a ride, you can try 4mg of chlorpheniramine maleate. These are both antihistamines. Before every hard ride, I use a nasal spray, oxymetazoline hydrochloride. That's a decongestant. I don't need it for easy rides.

It's possible that your problem is airborne allergens. A HEPA filter near your bed might help with the night problem.

If these measures are ineffective, you can go the prescription route. Many people like Nasonex, others prefer Flonase. These are both nasal sprays. They both work very well. Your doctor can prescribe.
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Old 04-27-10, 12:07 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by deep_sky View Post
Well, let me give a little background. As far back as I can remember, I have woken up congested and nauseated from the post-nasal drip. This clears up in 1-2 hours on a day that I don't ride. When I do ride, if its an easy recovery ride, I don't produce much mucus. If I am working hard, the faucets are at full throttle and I am constantly wiping my nose no matter what the temperature.
I just recently added regular dairy back into my diet a couple of weeks ago, and I have noticed no appreciable difference in the amount of mucus I have, so while things do point to a food allergy, I am not sure it is dairy causing it.
I will definitely try pineapple though, and see if that at least thins things out.

If you're waking up congested, one thing I've found that helps is to make sure that I clean my mouth properly before going to bed. I brush & floss, but also use one of those tongue-scrapers and then finish off with an antiseptic gargle. This makes sense to me since the mouth and nasal, and sinus are all one surface.

Also make sure you're adequately hydrated at all times, my rule of thumb is that if I don't get up in the middle of the night to use the bathroom, I'm running low. You can also try saline nasal sprays to keep things more fluid.
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Old 04-27-10, 12:17 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by sheeepdot View Post
Allergies, nasal pollops, etc. etc. and I can't breath through my nose. It's always been like this, so I'm more or less used to it, but it has also always limited my endurance. My chest/lung muscles give out way before my legs do, and I'll end up taking very shallow quick breaths.

I've been running as well as riding this year, and that is helping tremendously. Just wondering if anyone else has any thoughts on, well, breathing.

I'm not looking for cures, trust me I've tried them all, just wondering if anyone's got any hints or tips.

-O
That describes me, other than the running part (stopped that a few years ago).

Breathe Rite strips at night, and a single psuedefed.

Deep breathing too.

Try to become aware of when and where you have problems to isolate potential causes. I found out I was allergic to a building I worked in years ago. It used to be a chemical warehouse. All the employees had 'colds' all the time.
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Old 04-27-10, 02:09 PM   #11
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Ok, well if dairy isn't the culprit, I can almost guarantee you that something in your diet or something your body is coming in contact with is causing that mucus. All you have to do is find out what it is.
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Old 05-04-10, 02:48 PM   #12
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Get a dozen hookworms inside you and you should be fine. They clear up allergies nicely.
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Old 05-04-10, 06:03 PM   #13
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I used to have breathing problems as my nose has been broken a couple of times. I had a deviated septum, before the surgery, which was affecting the nasal passages, making them smaller I presume, or just uneven. Either way, breathing through the nose was difficult, more so when I had hayfever or a cold. The surgery really fixed the septum and I've had little trouble since. I just wish they'd done as good a job on the outside of the nose. It doesn't look too bad, just left me with an unusual profile.
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