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  1. #1
    Group Rides are Fun
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    Golden Cheetah Performance Manager

    What is the Golden Cheetah Performance Manager for?


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    Quote Originally Posted by MrMojoJoJo View Post
    What is the Golden Cheetah Performance Manager for?
    http://home.trainingpeaks.com/articl...ent-chart.aspx
    http://home.trainingpeaks.com/articl...e-manager.aspx

  3. #3
    BALM Co. 2005trek1200's Avatar
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    can anyone tell me how to set up the time in hear rate zones?
    BALM CO.
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  4. #4
    Senior Member ericm979's Avatar
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    It's in the options tab. Click "rider" on the left, then click the HR zones tab. It should be obvious what to do.

    The GC wiki has a lot of instructional videos that have been added recently, including one on the use of the PM:
    http://bugs.goldencheetah.org/projec...nager_%28PM%29

  5. #5
    BALM Co. 2005trek1200's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ericm979 View Post
    It's in the options tab. Click "rider" on the left, then click the HR zones tab. It should be obvious what to do.

    The GC wiki has a lot of instructional videos that have been added recently, including one on the use of the PM:
    http://bugs.goldencheetah.org/projec...nager_%28PM%29
    ive tried...

    i go into preferenced, athlete, hr zones...then i entered in a LT history with the HR zones i wanted (in BPM) and it still does not show up. Also the "default tab" what shoukd the %s be set to....given that they are % of TRIMPK

    surprisingly, this is not all that self explanatory...
    BALM CO.
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  6. #6
    Senior Member ericm979's Avatar
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    I don't use HR zones but I looked at it for a couple minutes and figured it out:

    Set the default zones to what you want (i.e. if you think that Z5 begins at 100% of LT instead of 105%, set it to 100%). If you don't know what to set those to, leave them alone. The numbers there are one of the more common HR zone systems. But if you want to use say 6 zones instead of 5 this is the place to change it.

    Then set your LT, RHR and HRmax for a given time period (usually from the day you did your LT test) and click "Add LT". You should see zones appear in the window below. The zones are based off the LT. You can edit the zones if you don't like the ones that the default percentages gave you.

    Then click save. All rides from the LT start date should reflect the new zones (but you may need to exit the program and start it up again to see the changes).

  7. #7
    BALM Co. 2005trek1200's Avatar
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    eric, i think i finally got it...amazing that i was doing exactly what you suggested before, but it somehow just wasnt working. thanks for taking the time.
    BALM CO.
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  8. #8
    just another gosling Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
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    I've been reading this thread and associated documents with interest. I can't rationalize buying a power meter, but I am interested in performance optimization. It looks to me like one can use Performance Manager with just a HRM, generating TRIMPS instead of TSS. But that's just the input side. One also wants an output side - how has one's TRIMPS or TSS affected one's output? It looks to me like there's no output side unless one is using a power meter. Is so? If so, not that attractive for the HRM only user like myself.

    Thanks.

    I use speed at various HRs on my rollers for the output side in my own training and TRIMPS for the input side.

  9. #9
    Senior Member ericm979's Avatar
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    When you have a stress score, you can use the performance manager. That's an "output". It shows your long term and short term stress, and your stress balance.
    I find it useful to tell me when I am training too much and need an easy week. That's why I wrote it for GC.

    But training stress is only one thing that GC can use... power data can also be used to determine threshold, look for improvements, etc. Without power you won't get that but you can still see time in zone, only you'd be using HR zones rather than power zones.

  10. #10
    just another gosling Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ericm979 View Post
    When you have a stress score, you can use the performance manager. That's an "output". It shows your long term and short term stress, and your stress balance.
    I find it useful to tell me when I am training too much and need an easy week. That's why I wrote it for GC.

    But training stress is only one thing that GC can use... power data can also be used to determine threshold, look for improvements, etc. Without power you won't get that but you can still see time in zone, only you'd be using HR zones rather than power zones.
    Thanks, Eric. It's just semantics. I'm looking for a metric that I can use to detect, with certainty, changes in my power output, without actually using a power meter. The problem of course for the HRM-only user is that HR will be all over the place depending on the user's neck size, etc.

    Looking at the doc available online, it looks like the program will only accept .csv files from other software, like Polar's. Polar can output .txt files, but they're not csv. So I guess I can't use it with my Polar unless it can download directly from a Polar unit via Polar's USB device.

    I've been using my rollers (with resistance) as a substitute for a power meter, mostly watching my speed at HR. I've seen the limitations of that for a long time. I'm thinking of doing CP3 and CP12 tests on my rollers, recording average speeds, multiplying by 10 to get numbers that are probably a function of watts, then using a calculator like this:
    http://www.twowheelblogs.com/critical-power-calculator
    to get a function of CP60, which I can record and add to my TRIMPS graph as calculated in the Polar ProTrainer. Does this sound like a reasonable thing to do? Alternatives?

    If I were to do this, how often do you think should I test?

    I'm currently using a 5 mile all-out TT on my rollers to test current power, but that's a very hard test from which to get reliable results. And it really hurts.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
    I'm currently using a 5 mile all-out TT on my rollers to test current power, but that's a very hard test from which to get reliable results. And it really hurts.
    Other than being a little short, what is wrong with that test? If your Polar can record speed then you should be able to use that to approximate your power output. You won't have absolute accuracy but it should be good for measuring relative changes.

  12. #12
    just another gosling Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gregf83 View Post
    Other than being a little short, what is wrong with that test? If your Polar can record speed then you should be able to use that to approximate your power output. You won't have absolute accuracy but it should be good for measuring relative changes.
    I've been told to do these, as I said, all-out. Which means I ramp up my power somewhat continuously during the test, trying to hit MHR at a moment that coincides with the 5 mile point. That can be a little tricky, depending on my training state. I was hoping that doing steady-state tests like the CP3 and CP12 would be a little easier to get good results from. But since I've never done them, I can't evaluate that. ??

  13. #13
    Senior Member ericm979's Avatar
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    If you have decent hills, then you can use a ~20 min climb to estimate FTP. Plug the numbers into one of the on line power estimation sites. The steeper the climb the less inaccurate the results will be (as wind resistance is less of a factor). I've found that it's reasonably close to what I see on the powertap.

    Once you have the 20 min power estimation you can assume that FTP is .95 of it.

    The problem with doing your test indoor on rollers is that power drops quite a bit when you overheat, and it is difficult to get cooled while riding inside. You need some really big fans to replace the natural convection that happens when you are moving your entire body through the air. Also I'd imagine that changing tires or wheels would cause a big change in the amount of power required to go a certain speed, since the resistance on rollers is rolling resistance and air resistance generated from spinning the wheel. Both of those factors would make the test inconsistent.

    There used to be an open source package for reading Polar data on unix machines. I hacked that up with a TkPerl UI for tracking my rides when I was using a polar. It was ok but not as good as GC with a power meter.

    BTW if you want it I have a polar power unit for the 720 that I'll send you for cost of shipping. The plug is a bit flakey (common problem) so it would need some soldering to fix.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
    I've been told to do these, as I said, all-out. Which means I ramp up my power somewhat continuously during the test, trying to hit MHR at a moment that coincides with the 5 mile point. That can be a little tricky, depending on my training state. I was hoping that doing steady-state tests like the CP3 and CP12 would be a little easier to get good results from. But since I've never done them, I can't evaluate that. ??
    Ideally, you want to do any TT test at a constant power. It may take some practice to figure out how hard to go but when they say all out they mean as hard as you can while still maintaining a steady power output.

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