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  1. #26
    Stegosaurus Crunkologist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by H23
    All of those things can be done on _any_ type of bicycle (including single speed cruisers!).
    The bike does not care where you take it. I think you are trying to make a case for one type of riding versus another (road vs mountain).

    A mountain bike workout can be as regulated and focused as a road bike workout and vice versa. I haven't actually bought a new mountain bike since 1994-- it now seems that you can't get a regular fork these days. I guess now the thing to get is a "hybrid" (my way of saying a 700c mountain bike with no suspension).

    The thing about road bikes is that they are relatively expensive and demand a more aero posture. The original poster said he needed to loose weight. If it is a lot of weight, even a 45 degree angle could be hard to do.

    Either way, have fun, pick something that fits you, and keep up the exercise.
    Yeah, any bike is good. I'm just really happy that I got my road bike.

    The riding partner is a good point. Also, if you're fat and self conscious: night rides are great.

  2. #27
    Name's Ash ...housewares Doctor Morbius's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by twahl
    While this is exactly 100% correct, I still maintain that it's easier to control the workout on the road. Bike style really doesn't matter, but I find it easier to ride a road bike on the road.
    It is exactly 100% correct. No more and no less.

    Riding a bike for 3 hours at 75% of one's max heart rate on the same terrain at the same cadence at sea level with the same crank length will accomplish the exact same level of exercise stimulus. There are no if's and's or but's about it. Stating anything else would be the equivalent to saying that one brand of iron dumbell will produce better gains and bigger biceps than another brand of iron dumbell. This just isn't so.

    What you really are saying is that for you, it is easier to ride a road bike on the road while maintaining a steady HR. Hence, you are biased in favor of road bikes.

  3. #28
    Name's Ash ...housewares Doctor Morbius's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeff williams
    A fighter in the mtb camp...hmmmm..
    Sorry, but I am not really in either camp on this one. My stating that an MTB is a versatile and cost effective bicycle is a fact and has nothing to do with riding preference.

    An MTB can be ridden anywhere and for many types of riding - on the road, on trails or even used for aggressive urban assault sessions, should the rider be into that sort of thing. Road bikes are really only good on pavement with the exception of a cyclocross styled bike, which will be outfitted differently and usually has different gearing.

    There is also a financial reason that an MTB may be a better choice for the original poster. Sometimes that difference is vast! For example, I own a mid-grade Deore equipped MTB and a mid-grade 105 equipped road bike. There is a significant difference in cost between the two bikes. The MTB cost approx. $400 while the road bike cost $1,100. The difference in cost is more than enough to purchase several nice accessories, such as a decent HRM, gloves, helmet, a second set of wheels with road tires, a cyclometer, and a CycleOps Fluid 2 trainer for indoor sessions for bad weather days and winter months.

  4. #29
    Name's Ash ...housewares Doctor Morbius's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NewTrekRoadie
    . . . I think mountain biking is a lot of fun, I still plan on going sometimes, but the thing is, depending on where you live, you normally have to put the bike on the car and drive somewhere to ride. With a road bike you open up the garage door and you are off . . . .
    Where I live there are no such laws preventing one from riding anything but a road bike out of their garage. Your comminuty must have some pretty strict covenants!

  5. #30
    Stegosaurus Crunkologist's Avatar
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    Apples and Oranges. You do NOT need to spend $1,100 dollars on a first road bike! I spent $650 on a Giant OCR-3 with comprehensive service... and most people spend $550 on em. Shimano Sura components aren't all that bad, and are totally appropriate for a first bike. You can spend $500 and get this stuff.

  6. #31
    Tom (ex)Builder twahl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Morbius
    It is exactly 100% correct. No more and no less.

    Riding a bike for 3 hours at 75% of one's max heart rate on the same terrain at the same cadence at sea level with the same crank length will accomplish the exact same level of exercise stimulus. There are no if's and's or but's about it. Stating anything else would be the equivalent to saying that one brand of iron dumbell will produce better gains and bigger biceps than another brand of iron dumbell. This just isn't so.

    What you really are saying is that for you, it is easier to ride a road bike on the road while maintaining a steady HR. Hence, you are biased in favor of road bikes.
    No. What I am really saying is that it's easier to control the workout on the road. Beyond that I said that it is easier for me to ride a road bike on the road. I'm not disagreeing with your point that any type of bike will do the job, I'm saying that it's easier to do that job under mor controlled conditions which generally occur on the road as opposed to on the trails. This doesn't negate the idea that a bike more suited to the riding conditions is inherantly better for those conditions.
    Tom

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  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Morbius
    Where I live there are no such laws preventing one from riding anything but a road bike out of their garage. Your comminuty must have some pretty strict covenants!

    Yeah, yeah, funny. My point really is that, if you are going to ride on the road, then riding a road bike is a lot more enjoyable, than a mountain bike, even with road tires. A friend of mine went on a ride with me this weekend, he has a mountain bike and is in much better shape than me. I was on my road bike, he was on his mountain bike and I completely blew him away, had to wait many times for him to catch up. To me it is more fun to be able to ride faster and farther when riding on the road, and a road bike accomplishes this over the mountain bike with or without road tires. You will stick to riding, if riding on the road with a road bike over a mountain bike on the road. But if you want to ride in the woods, then it's a whole different story.

  8. #33
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    After reading the thread upto this point (Dr.M's 1st post), looking for someone to argue FOR the correct response to "riding a bike to lose weight", I have to agree with Dr.M. It is the intensity and how long one maintains the ideal intensity that matters. I have been riding a MTB for with my heart rate monitor on average 45min - 90min rides and find that I can keep up heart rate up at 80% ride thru'. Becuase of the variations in terrain, having to navigate rocks, roots, mud, gravel, constant hills and small jumps, stairs etc., (the list is endless), my entire body is being exercised to stay on the bike and keep momentum. Personally, I would find it boring to ride a Road Bike for 2 hours to gain the same amount of calorie burn. The downside to MTB might be more maintenance/repairs to your bike and bodily injury, depending on your level of riding. FYI, a combination of circuit training at the gym (45min x 3days/week) plus 2-3 days of trail riding over the summer (3 months) have helped me drop my body fat percentage from 25% down to 17.5%. I can't wait for the next season, because it's too damn cold to ride out here in SouthWestern Ontario now.

    cheers,

  9. #34
    Senior Member FXjohn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by trailover
    After reading the thread upto this point (Dr.M's 1st post), looking for someone to argue FOR the correct response to "riding a bike to lose weight", I have to agree with Dr.M. It is the intensity and how long one maintains the ideal intensity that matters. I have been riding a MTB for with my heart rate monitor on average 45min - 90min rides and find that I can keep up heart rate up at 80% ride thru'. Becuase of the variations in terrain, having to navigate rocks, roots, mud, gravel, constant hills and small jumps, stairs etc., (the list is endless), my entire body is being exercised to stay on the bike and keep momentum. Personally, I would find it boring to ride a Road Bike for 2 hours to gain the same amount of calorie burn. The downside to MTB might be more maintenance/repairs to your bike and bodily injury, depending on your level of riding. FYI, a combination of circuit training at the gym (45min x 3days/week) plus 2-3 days of trail riding over the summer (3 months) have helped me drop my body fat percentage from 25% down to 17.5%. I can't wait for the next season, because it's too damn cold to ride out here in SouthWestern Ontario now.

    cheers,
    too cold to ride, are you serious?

  10. #35
    Stoked
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    I have been riding a MTB for with my heart rate monitor on average 45min - 90min rides and find that I can keep up heart rate up at 80% ride thru'.
    I would find it boring to ride a Road Bike for 2 hours to gain the same amount of calorie burn.
    This is where you are in error, relating to the stated goals of our tread-starter.

    45-90 min of high intensity excercise does not yield the same results at 120 min of lower intensity excercise.

    It's not that you don't put out more work, it's the fuel that you use to accomplish the work (fat+02 vs. glycogen).

    Sure it's easy to get the HR up on a mtn. bike. My problem is that I'm having too much fun to keep it DOWN in the zone I need.

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by moyke
    Hi,

    I'm planning to buy a bike for training and weight-loss.

    could I ask which would be a better bike for this purpose, i.e. road or mountain bike?

    thanks.
    Honestly, I would get a marin urban bike like a muir woods(mtn-bike like hybrid) or a larkspur( road bike-like hybrid). They are cheap....under $400 and tough.

    For fitness who cares how far you can go. All that matters is burning calories. That being said a larkspur or muir woods can get you some serious mileage while have nice handling.

    P.S. This is coming from a guy who rides a road bike.

  12. #37
    rwg
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    You guys have all hit on, stated, and then forgotten the point. The key to weight loss is time in the saddle. Even crappy heart rate time in the saddle is better than sitting on the couch. Get the bike that you will find the most fun, b/c you will surely ride that the most.

    For me, it's road bikes. Mtn bikes with slicks suck on the road, imo, and are only worthy for riding if you live in a city with potholes and lots of glass. Hybrid bikes don't really do anything well. They can survive trails, but they aren't real good at them. They can give a comfortable ride on the road, but I was never able to go long or fast with them. I love the road bikes and I go for hours just b/c I can. (I really have spent time doing all of these things - I am just a roadie at heart.)

    But Turtlendog and maybe Dr. Morbius and definately Jeff all seem to have more fun on mtn bikes and probably disagree with everything I said above.

    So - time on the bike rules, buy whatever you will have the most fun with.

  13. #38
    I couldn't car less. jeff williams's Avatar
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    The only simple factor I could say is of consideration is mtb's give the option of road-off road. A real road bike is best not on the trail unless your Dave Moulton.

    So with say 2 sets of wheels, small\ light and off-road, you can do what you like- go camp and ride around, swap out wheels -commute to work.

    If not a dedicated bike to each, I'd go mtb for the versatility, factor in the geographic, are you rural, country..all town? I imagine if I lived in a predominantly paved part of the world I'd be a roadie...naw..I'd move.

    I ride my mtb like a speed freak in town, or all urban\ jump stuff.
    When I'm in the woods i'm usually riding slow enjoying nature....well until I find some crazy wet downhill ravine that looks like fun.

    Each to thier own, and hopefully they can find it! The important thing is to do it consistantly to develop skill and stamina.

    I was jumping ramps 25 yrs ago..I still do. Since I have a road bike ( Ritchey mtb..yes I said road.) I now want a second bike...a FUN bike.

    http://www.bikesutra.com/rr_30_24_le_toy.html

    Wahoo! now that's a grocery bike.." Hey dear, going out for milk!" Gone for hours.

  14. #39
    Unfit, fat and forty SSSwede's Avatar
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    For me, to get a good workout I ride a single speed road bike, and it has removed several pounds from my fat belly, but of course I find it real fun to ride also which gives more time in the saddle.

  15. #40
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    Turtlendog - true. I wish I could keep the HR down enough to burn more fat, but it helps me to think " I'm getting fitter in leaps in bounds" !!.... but FOR ME, the ride isn't from that perspective. When I'm moving, I just don't want to stop or slow the pace. Even working on my "log jumping" skills to reduce stop time !!

    About the calory burn thing, I assumed that 120min on a Road bike would also be at a relatively high pace or ABOVE the ideal fatburn level of 60-70%. You've probably got to be pretty fit to spin on Road bike at that heart rate, right?
    - "The uncreative mind can spot wrong answers, but it takes a very creative mind to spot wrong questions"- Anthony Jay

  16. #41
    Name's Ash ...housewares Doctor Morbius's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by trailover
    Turtlendog - true. I wish I could keep the HR down enough to burn more fat, but it helps me to think " I'm getting fitter in leaps in bounds" !!.... but FOR ME, the ride isn't from that perspective. When I'm moving, I just don't want to stop or slow the pace. Even working on my "log jumping" skills to reduce stop time !!

    About the calorie burn thing, I assumed that 120min on a Road bike would also be at a relatively high pace or ABOVE the ideal fatburn level of 60-70%. You've probably got to be pretty fit to spin on Road bike at that heart rate, right?
    Well, you could always ride slower on a road bike so that you stay within the 60% - 70% zone.

  17. #42
    Name's Ash ...housewares Doctor Morbius's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by twahl
    No. What I am really saying is that it's easier to control the workout on the road. Beyond that I said that it is easier for me to ride a road bike on the road. I'm not disagreeing with your point that any type of bike will do the job, I'm saying that it's easier to do that job under mor controlled conditions which generally occur on the road as opposed to on the trails. This doesn't negate the idea that a bike more suited to the riding conditions is inherantly better for those conditions.
    My apologies. I misread your post. I thought you said, "while this isn't exactly 100% correct". Yes I agree that it is easier to control one's HR while riding on pavement, especially the flats. A trainer would be easier yet to control one's HR.

  18. #43
    Name's Ash ...housewares Doctor Morbius's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rwg
    You guys have all hit on, stated, and then forgotten the point. The key to weight loss is time in the saddle. Even crappy heart rate time in the saddle is better than sitting on the couch. Get the bike that you will find the most fun, b/c you will surely ride that the most.

    For me, it's road bikes. Mtn bikes with slicks suck on the road, imo, and are only worthy for riding if you live in a city with potholes and lots of glass. Hybrid bikes don't really do anything well. They can survive trails, but they aren't real good at them. They can give a comfortable ride on the road, but I was never able to go long or fast with them. I love the road bikes and I go for hours just b/c I can. (I really have spent time doing all of these things - I am just a roadie at heart.)

    But Turtlendog and maybe Dr. Morbius and definately Jeff all seem to have more fun on mtn bikes and probably disagree with everything I said above.

    So - time on the bike rules, buy whatever you will have the most fun with.
    Oh no. I have a Specialized Seqoia Elite that is a blast to ride. I love it. But it cost considerably more than my Raleigh M60 MTB. I've regularly done 4 hour rides on both the Sequoia and the M60. I just didn't cover the same distance on the M60. I enjoy riding both of them very much. It's all about TITS - Time In The Saddle.

    But still, if for some reason I had to pick only one type of bike to own and ride it would be the MTB as it can do just about anything, just not as fast.

  19. #44
    Stoked
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    About the calory burn thing, I assumed that 120min on a Road bike would also be at a relatively high pace or ABOVE the ideal fatburn level of 60-70%. You've probably got to be pretty fit to spin on Road bike at that heart rate, right?
    You can almost (except big hills) go slow enough on a road bike to keep the HR in the right zone. OTOH I often find myself sprinting on my mtn. bike in order to clear an obstacle. Admitedly, this has alot to do with the trails I choose.

  20. #45
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    Is there anyone from London, Ontario on this forum? How does one search or research such a thing? I'd love to find a riding partner for a once a week ride, at least....
    - "The uncreative mind can spot wrong answers, but it takes a very creative mind to spot wrong questions"- Anthony Jay

  21. #46
    Junior Member GatorTrek's Avatar
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    I just bought my first bike. I had the same dilemma but even the $700 for an entry level Specialized Allez or a Trek was more than I wanted to commit. So, I ended up buying the Trek 7500 FX. It sells for $659, but I got it at $495 new because it was '04. As a newbie, buying from a LBS wsa important so that they could perform upkeep for me as i learn. It is a hybrid heavily biased on the road side. I am thinking about putting bar ends on for multiple hand positioning. Other than that I am well pleased. Even as a 220 pound newbie who is trying to do cardio and lose weight, I can average 14 mph over 15 miles. I keep my heart rate up by climbing hard and sprinting down hills (I hit 25 mph today!). For my two cents, the road biased hybrid works well.
    "I'm GatorTrek and I approved this message."

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by moyke
    Hi,

    I'm planning to buy a bike for training and weight-loss.

    could I ask which would be a better bike for this purpose, i.e. road or mountain bike?

    thanks.
    If you already know you like to ride, get both.
    I ride whats convenient unless I get a craving. I am however limited being in Stone mountain Ga.<Mountains = lots of hills. So I tend to stand up an Pump the hills to get the workout I want.
    Trail riding is very different. ups downs twists an turns, logs holes etc.
    If you have a place to to just ride and you want comfort, someone suggested getting 2 sets of wheels for the same Bike. I thinks that's going to be your best deal for advise.

    I Scoot2 do U ?

    ps; get fitted B4 U Buy !!

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    Hi.

    i opted for a steel, then titanium, cyclocross bike with a variable angle headset.
    i had been a competitive triathlete in the 90's, then mtb allthrough grad school in the 2000's.
    As it has been pointed out, the best bike to get fit is the one you will ride most of the time. So, if you live next to a trail, an atb or if it is a bike path, then a light weight road bike with some electronics to keep you motivated.
    Going with a cyclocross bike with dedicated off and on road wheels/tires means you can ride 90-99% of your local paths at a reasonably high level of efficiency, which should keep you motivated. You can also set the bike a bit more upright (usually 1 cm higher and shorter stem) wich should help keep you in the bike for longer while avoiding back injuries. Dont skimp on the saddle fit, pedals, handlebars or brifters: they are your points of contact and will make or break how long you can ride for. And how pleasant your ride will be. Some frame manufacturers build bikes with flexible rear ends: voodoo wazoo and some surlys will allow younto convert to single speed or fixed gear. It migh be useful to improve your technique at some point. Change breeds improvements. I have a quiver of bikes, but the two bikes that get rid most of the time are my cx bikes.
    They also make superb commuters when you finally buy a dedicated road and mountain bike. Just add some racks, mudguards and lights.



    pd. My wife just got her first high performance bike: a highly customized specialized cirrus. Thudbuster to compensate for the alloy frame, a variable angle stem and 35c paselas on velocity rims. On her first brutal ride around Crescent Lake Or, we hit a nice 50 min of paved road. No problem. Then, 18 miles of very loose gravel and volcanic ash. After some creative cussing and divorce threats on her part, she was able to continue by adjusting stem heigh and droping tire pressure. When we hit the highway again, just pumped back to 70 psi and finished another hour of tarmac. A flexible bike allows younto cover more types of unexpected terrain in more comfort. So, add high spec hybrids to the mix, they also can meet the challenges. Finally, check out the Salsa Fargo and the Vaya, ive been hearing good things about them.
    Last edited by vuelamanuel; 07-12-14 at 03:08 PM.

  24. #49
    Travelling hopefully chasm54's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vuelamanuel View Post
    Hi.
    Hi. You do realise you're replying to a post that is ten years old, do you?
    There have been many days when I haven't felt like riding, but there has never been a day when I was sorry I rode.

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