Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 40
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Baton Rouge, LA
    My Bikes
    Roadmaster Mtn Sport, Schwinn Prelude
    Posts
    21
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Losing pot belly - Faster or longer?

    My Sports Tracker profile I started creating and using recently is here. I have been maintaining around 12-14mph, 30-35 minutes, ~8 ish mile bicycling runs.

    Right now, I just want to lose my visible stomach. That's about it. I know the basics, calories spent should be more than calories taken in, can't spot reduce, etc etc.

    So ..what do you guys recommend I do? Should I increase the distance / time I exercise? Or should I try to pedal faster and harder ?

    Another note, it appears as if I am pushing my pedals as hard as I can ... is that a good thing or a bad thing?

  2. #2
    Galveston County Texas 10 Wheels's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    In The Wind
    My Bikes
    GTO
    Posts
    25,912
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Eat Less, belly shrinks.
    [SIZE=1][B]What I like about Texas[/B]
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PGukLuXzH1E

    Set F1re To The Ra1n ( NY Night Rain Ride)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W7jfcWEkSrI

  3. #3
    Fast for a Fred JayhawKen's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Missouri
    My Bikes
    LeMond Tourmalet
    Posts
    341
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If your sole focus at this point is weight loss, I would first increase total hours per week until you are at the limit of your schedule, then begin adding hard days as you gain fitness. As far as what constitutes a "hard" day and how fast - that is a whole 'nuther thing.

    Regarding "pushing hard on pedals" - what is your cadence? Probably want to keep it above the mid 80's at a minimum on average, and work toward mid to upper 90's as you develop. Most beginners find themselves pedaling with a very slow cadence, which is not generally a good thing.
    Quote Originally Posted by caloso View Post
    ... bad things can happen when you're hypoxic....

  4. #4
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Baton Rouge, LA
    My Bikes
    Roadmaster Mtn Sport, Schwinn Prelude
    Posts
    21
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Ok, so increase total hours per week. I think I can try that. My curiosity was primarily the difference between attempting to go all out and riding 14 miles per hour but only doing that for 30 minutes before I tire out, and riding at 12.5 miles per hour but being able to pedal for an hour at the same rate.

    The cadence part, I am pretty sure my cadence is not low and I have a decent understanding of gears, but the numbers, I have purchased a cadence computer and I will see what results I can get from that ..

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    My Bikes
    2010 GT Tachyon 3.0
    Posts
    1,201
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've slowed my cadence down because my nominal was 110-120. My heart rate was always exceedingly high, and I dropped from 155 to 143 in 2 weeks. Stopped there, but 3 months in I have a very slim tummy (lots of fat still!) and I'm stronger. I gained muscle, lost lots of fat. The quick drop was probably water weight from excreting excess sodium.
    Own: 2010 GT Tachyon 3.0
    Own: 2013 Trek Domane 2.0 + Revolution REV22 wheels

  6. #6
    Senior Member ericm979's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Santa Cruz Mountains
    Posts
    6,170
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Ride more, eat less.

    Riding longer but slower will burn more total calories than a short fast ride. So if you have the time, do it. If you don't have the time for a long ride, do a shorter faster one.

    If you can build up to 3-4 hour long rides you'll burn a lot of calories. You will have to eat some to ride over 2 or so hours. But that's ok because you may eat 150 cal/hr but burn 500 cal/hr at an endurance pace. It adds up.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    My Bikes
    Trek FX 7.2
    Posts
    238
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I would think of it in terms of miles. More miles = more calories. Speed can be deceiving because you may go harder but not as far. Time can be deceiving because you may go further but not harder.

    *edit: that last sentence should probably be rephrased - you may go longer but not as hard.
    Last edited by dolanp; 06-27-11 at 10:17 PM.

  8. #8
    Senior Member ericm979's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Santa Cruz Mountains
    Posts
    6,170
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The pros (and coaches, and amateur racers) do training in terms of time, not distance.

  9. #9
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Baton Rouge, LA
    My Bikes
    Roadmaster Mtn Sport, Schwinn Prelude
    Posts
    21
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by ericm979 View Post
    Riding longer but slower will burn more total calories than a short fast ride. So if you have the time, do it. If you can build up to 3-4 hour long rides you'll burn a lot of calories
    I didn't know that! Thank you, I shall put in some more time .. that I can do.

    Quote Originally Posted by ericm979 View Post
    You will have to eat some to ride over 2 or so hours.
    Can I take that as a rule of thumb? I generally just carry water with me, and atleast on the weekdays I won't be doing more than an hour or 75 minutes of cycling .. is there any pre-cycling snack that might be worth it? (I generally have an apple)

    Quote Originally Posted by dolanp View Post
    I would think of it in terms of miles. More miles = more calories. Speed can be deceiving because you may go harder but not as far. Time can be deceiving because you may go further but not harder.
    That makes sense. I am probably going to follow this ..

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Texas hill country
    My Bikes
    '11 CAADX105, '98 Rockhopper
    Posts
    82
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    www.myfitnesspal.com
    I lost 60 lbs and I've kept it off. Eat less for weight loss. Ride more for fitness. I see many people fail to lose weight by focusing on the exercise component. Nutrition and calorie intake is the key to controlling weight. Riding the bike means you can eat more calories. You must still be in control of how many that is. A typical basket of chips and queso will cost you 30-40 miles on the bike. It is easy to ride the bike and gain weight if you eat too much. Picture is before and after. Time between photos is 9 months. Most of my riding has happened since the weight loss.



  11. #11
    Senior Member OldsCOOL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    northern michigan
    My Bikes
    '88 Cannondale Criterium, '86 Trek 760
    Posts
    5,862
    Mentioned
    17 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    ***WARNING***

    The increase in mileage/distance is directly proportional to an increase in a passion for cycling and stress alleviation.
    Having a flat tire as part of the total cycling experience is highly overrated. Knowing how to fix one quickly is not.

    '85 Trek 460 road racer

    '89 Raleigh Technium PRE

    '79 Motobecane Super Mirage

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    My Bikes
    Trek FX 7.2
    Posts
    238
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by RayfromTX View Post
    www.myfitnesspal.com
    I lost 60 lbs and I've kept it off. Eat less for weight loss. Ride more for fitness. I see many people fail to lose weight by focusing on the exercise component. Nutrition and calorie intake is the key to controlling weight. Riding the bike means you can eat more calories. You must still be in control of how many that is. A typical basket of chips and queso will cost you 30-40 miles on the bike. It is easy to ride the bike and gain weight if you eat too much. Picture is before and after. Time between photos is 9 months. Most of my riding has happened since the weight loss.


    Solid work. I lost about the same amount of weight a few years ago and also have been keeping it off. You are 100% right about tracking everything you eat. People often 'reward' themselves with food after exercise and end up overdoing it and undoing their hard work.

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    585
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Answer? It depends.

    Try this on a treadmill so you can check out the difference for yourself:

    Do one session where you perform hard interval runs for 45 minutes- do 2 minutes as hard as you can running with a 30 second- 1 minute rest. At the end of 45 minutes, note your total calorie output.

    The next day, take a 75 minute easy run and note your total calorie output.

    You're going to notice something- the caloric output will be pretty close. In some cases, if you're really efficient and in pretty fit shape, you'll find that the 45 minute interval run may even produce a higher caloric output.

    So- if you're short on time, I always suggest intense interval training sessions. If you've got the time, go for the longer ride where you sustain an average speed. Both have their benefits.

    The one thing that is true is that you do need to watch your eating- creating a deficit of 200 calories per day and training 5- 6 days a week will trim you down, no matter if you choose to go with longer workouts of a steady pace or a shorter workout at an intense, higher workout.

    koffee
    i'm koffee brown, dammit!
    one of my new faves: http://streetknocknetwork.com

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    313
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I don't see you losing weight by exercise alone. I figure it takes me at least 70 miles (and could be more) to burn a pound of fat. Also that fat burning figures that I am not eating any more as a consequence of riding 70 miles (and that will NEVER happen). Exercise can help weight gain but you will have to watch what you eat pretty carefully. It is very easy for a bunch of calories to hide out in one's diet. So many of our convenience and snack foods are incredibly calorie rich.

  15. #15
    Senior Member Richard Cranium's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Deep in the Shawnee Forest
    My Bikes
    LeMond - Gunnar
    Posts
    2,786
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Another note, it appears as if I am pushing my pedals as hard as I can ... is that a good thing or a bad thing?
    Yes it is a bad thing - mostly because it is unlikely you will keep doing it - which will lead to quitting and more yo-yo dieting.

    Focusing on you paunch or gut or whatever should be a secondary goal - that only comes in to play after you have reached your ideal body mass.

    And again -it is the long term that counts in regaining a great body shape. The mechanisms surrounding different body fat tissue make it nearly impossible to lose quickly. If you are really vain - and have the money -then get to a doctor that likes to cut.

    The only other "healthy" avenue is to introduce activities that "jar" the fat tissues. Sprinting, jumping rope or any exercise that invokes connective tissues of the torso will help "hide" fat tissue and generally improve what is known as a "good physique."
    Sorry about my comments - I thought you wanted honest feedback.
    2003 Lemond Wayzata - 2002 LeMond Malliot Jeune

  16. #16
    Member Jaguarundi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Texas
    My Bikes
    1988 Schwinn Prelude, FrankenMTB
    Posts
    46
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    People are saying that exercise won't help you lose weight. I agree that you have to diet too, but exercising regularly (as you're doing) will increase your metabolism and you'll feel your body demanding more calories as your workouts get more advanced. Reward your hard work by eating HEALTHY and varied food until you are SATISFIED. Not binging nor starving.

    As the others said, longer workouts burn more calories than short, intense workouts. If you can feel your heart beating, even if you're not going that fast, you're doing good. Keep pushing. But not too hard cause you'll get discouraged or injured.

    I find that it's actually easier to work out every day rather than 3x a week (or whatever doctors are recommending) because a regular schedule becomes a routine part of my day and keeps me feeling healthy. This also allows me to vary the intensity of the workout without losing progress. If I'm not feeling it, I'll just go on a nice and easy ride, just to get out in the fresh air, move around, and then stretch. And if I skip a day or two it's no big deal. I congratulate myself if I've gone the same distance or more than the day before. And each time I feel I'm about to wear out, I try to push just a teensy bit harder. Then I coast down some fun hill and go home pleased.

  17. #17
    The Left Coast, USA FrenchFit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    2,452
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by harisund View Post
    My Sports Tracker profile I started creating and using recently is here. I have been maintaining around 12-14mph, 30-35 minutes, ~8 ish mile bicycling runs.

    Right now, I just want to lose my visible stomach. That's about it. I know the basics, calories spent should be more than calories taken in, can't spot reduce, etc etc.

    So ..what do you guys recommend I do? Should I increase the distance / time I exercise? Or should I try to pedal faster and harder ?

    Another note, it appears as if I am pushing my pedals as hard as I can ... is that a good thing or a bad thing?
    Do a little research. You want to be in a moderate exercise mode for a long duration to burn fat. Intensity workouts will put you in a high cardio zone, and that's not what you want. Back off, spin easy. If you can't carry on a conversation while biking your effort level is too high for what you're looking for. If you want to build strength and cardio, then start pushing it.

  18. #18
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Baton Rouge, LA
    My Bikes
    Roadmaster Mtn Sport, Schwinn Prelude
    Posts
    21
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks a lot for your responses guys.

    Lessons learnt, watch what I eat and longer drives.

    I have increased my distance from 8 miles to 10 miles, which allows me to cycle for around 40 minutes and a little more as opposed to my earlier 33. .. I will probably increase it a little more, and continue watching my diet (I am pretty sure that's the reason why I am not losing any weight)


    Quote Originally Posted by OldsCOOL View Post
    ***WARNING***

    The increase in mileage/distance is directly proportional to an increase in a passion for cycling and stress alleviation.
    This I agree with

  19. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Sunnyvale, CA USA
    Posts
    3,125
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by harisund View Post
    So ..what do you guys recommend I do? Should I increase the distance / time I exercise? Or should I try to pedal faster and harder ?
    Yes. Riding harder will increase the power you can sustain at lower intensity levels, but can't be done every day (you won't be fresh enough, and attempting to will leave you both slow and tired). A couple of hard days with 10 minute threshold intervals, some endurance riding, and some time off the bike are normal with every fourth week a rest week where you only ride at an endurance pace. Riding hard will increase your resting metabolic rate for hours and burn a few hundred more kilo calories. Easy rides won't do anything for you once you're off the bike.

    Another note, it appears as if I am pushing my pedals as hard as I can ... is that a good thing or a bad thing?
    Bad. You'll fatigue much sooner at the same power / rate of energy consumption and risk knee problems.

  20. #20
    Senior Member Northwestrider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Gig Harbor, WA
    My Bikes
    Surly Long Haul Trucker, Gary Fisher Hoo Koo E Koo, Dahon Mu P 24 , Bacchetta Strada, Rodriguez Tandem, Wheeler MTB
    Posts
    2,153
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I recomment longer slower, speed will happen when it wants to. Enjoy the work out so that you are more sure to be regular

  21. #21
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Baton Rouge, LA
    My Bikes
    Roadmaster Mtn Sport, Schwinn Prelude
    Posts
    21
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yep, that's what I am going to aim for . I am going to get a cheap heart rate monitor, try to be in the upper fat burning, lower cardio zone and try to go longer !

  22. #22
    2 Fat 2 Furious contango's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    England
    My Bikes
    2009 Specialized Rockhopper Comp Disc, 2009 Specialized Tricross Sport
    Posts
    3,997
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've found that getting a rough idea of how many calories it takes to do a certain activity makes me focus on whether I really want that snack. Easy example - I reckon on burning about 40 calories per mile on my bike, and there are about 500 calories in a Snickers Duo. So it's an easy question to decide whether the Snickers is worth 12 miles on the bike. Or, put another way, if I ride 12 miles and then eat the Snickers I might as well not have bothered doing either, from a simplistic calorific point of view (OK, that ignores the enjoyment of the ride and any fitness benefits, but you get the picture)

    It took me a while of fiddling with the calorie meter on the treadmill at the gym to figure what I could have deduced if I'd stopped to think about it, namely that if I cover a mile I burn a certain number of calories regardless of my speed. If I'm sprinting I burn more calories in a given time but it doesn't make much difference in terms of calories over a given distance. When cycling as your speed increases you get more of an issue with wind resistance and it takes ever-more effort to gain each successive mph on your speed (the same would apply to running outside rather than on a treadmill).

    So on that basis if you're covering a set length and doing it faster and faster you'll gain a relatively small amount in terms of calories burned off. If you ride for a set time and cover longer and longer distances you'll be burning more and more calories. Don't forget that as you lose weight so it takes longer to burn calories, simply because you're moving less weight around.

  23. #23
    DON'T PANIC!
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Capital District, NY
    My Bikes
    Fuji Absolute 3.0
    Posts
    497
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    As others have alluded to diet is most important to weight loss. You can't outrun a bad diet with exercise. The fact is you are consuming between 2000-3000 calories in food ( guess ) and burning maybe 400 riding.

    You have to be careful here. High endurance cardio can be counter productive because you will naturally eat more in response, even if eating healthy you can easily over consume if you are not tracking you intake. Strength training and proper nutrition is important so that you end up losing the fat but retaining as much of the muscle mass as possible.

    I went through this last year from a BMI of 32 down to 20 with calorie counting ( LoseIt! app ), biking, and rock climbing as the main parts.

    Weight (April 2010) 200lb -> Goal (Nov 2010) 145lb Achieved -> (Aug 2011) 132lb 10%BF

    2010 Fuji Absolute 3.0
    2002 Steel LeMond Tourlamet

  24. #24
    Bike ≠ Car ≠ Ped. BarracksSi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Washington, DC
    My Bikes
    Some bikes. Hell, they're all the same, ain't they?
    Posts
    13,858
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Brontide View Post
    You can't outrun a bad diet with exercise.


    I wish I had taken some proper before-and-after pictures starting in 2009. I was at my heaviest that I've ever been, and I was riding more than ever, too.

    235 lbs in Oct 2009, nearly got below 200 a year later, popped up to 215 this past March, and over the past week I broke the 190 mark. I'm never going over 200 again if I can help it -- this just feels too good.

    You know Lance's line, "It's not about the bike,"? When losing the pot belly, it's about the kitchen.

  25. #25
    Senior Member libero's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    My Bikes
    Viner, Klein, Caad9, Giant
    Posts
    146
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I agree that riding longer helps to keep the weight off.

    What works for me even better, or better in combination, is running. Some sports, like running, have an appetite suppression effect (sometimes big sometimes small). Usually only for a run of more than 40minutes. If I do a high intensity workout, running, biking, or ball sports, my muscles get more sore and it's the opposite - extra hungry so I eat more.
    But all this varies by the individual so use these responses as a guide to find your own path.
    having said that, gotta run!

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •