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Old 07-11-11, 06:43 AM   #1
bluefoxicy
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Tired...

I've biked to work every day this month, also weekend rides around 25-30 miles (went to the MVA to renew my license...). Sore and tired, and didn't bike yesterday... today I was too tired to get up.

Does the ceiling just keep going? I thought once I could beat 3 or 4 days, that's it, I can just go every day; it seems like after 2-3 weeks, though, I start wearing down. That's normal? It seems fatal in the wild. If I had to hunt my own food, I'd be down for a few days, and then not have the strength o.o
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Old 07-11-11, 07:05 AM   #2
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It does get better and easier, but you do need rest. I get what your saying about "being in the wild." But keep in mind that the amount of work you are doing is completely abnormal for what is needed for survival. No animal would expend this much energy to get food, you would have to eat an insane amount. Notice most hunting animals stalk their prey....
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Old 07-11-11, 07:23 AM   #3
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I don't think humans have many advantages. Then again, humans aren't capable of wild survival; they're social creatures and the earliest pre-civilization humans formed tribes. You kill a deer and don't have a refrigerator, you got a lot of meat to go bad ... but there's 20 people in the tribe, so split up the meat and you're gold. Only 1 in 20 needs to find something big each day, I guess that leaves a lot of room for failure and rest.

Man also needs to use tools, though; catching a rabbit or a deer with your bare hands is hard. We're prone to throw rocks at it. This is probably why humans eat plants as well.
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Old 07-11-11, 07:53 AM   #4
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With respect, you really aren't doing many miles. An ordinary week for me would involve about the same mileage as your monthly total. So your "ceiling" is at present pretty low. Keep at it, increasing either the mileage or the intensity or both, and your tolerance will rise.

Having said that, the occasional day off is important. I was doing a long tour recently and took a day off every week even if I felt good. Its insurance against fatigue, minor injury etc.
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Old 07-11-11, 06:02 PM   #5
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Ee. In 11 days I've done wha .. 161 miles, about 14.5 per day average, though I've had 30 mile days and 3 mile days, and 2 days I haven't biked. Still, it's weird to me. I wake up exhausted as hell, I'm all "I'm not getting out of bed today..." and then 2 hours later I'm riding into work coming in 10 minutes late like

As for my "ceiling," I can commute to work every single day for 2 weeks straight. I would figure that my body wouldn't have enough endurance to go half a month and then demand rest; if it can keep things in line for 14 days straight, it should be able to do so indefinitely. That I can have an endurance of 2 weeks just like I can have an endurance of 2 days confuses me, since 2 weeks is plenty enough time for my body to build up if it can handle the load it's under, and thus it should be able to grow to meet demands in real time. 2 days and having a broken, sore, barely-working body is not long enough for your body to do repairs and build extra muscle and blood vessels for that third day.

So I'm like, wha???

But I guess it can happen. Well, it IS happening.
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Old 07-12-11, 07:58 AM   #6
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OK, in eleven days you've done 161 miles, but your total mileage for the year is only 725. So that implies that you have recently increased your mileage quite dramatically, given that in the first six months of the year you'd done less than 600 in total. Why would you be surprised that this results in fatigue? You need to adjust to a higher mileage load. In my view the number of days on which you are cycling is very much a secondary consideration.
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Old 07-12-11, 08:26 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluefoxicy View Post
As for my "ceiling," I can commute to work every single day for 2 weeks straight. I would figure that my body wouldn't have enough endurance to go half a month and then demand rest; if it can keep things in line for 14 days straight, it should be able to do so indefinitely.
Periodization is a common form of training where you progressively build up the amount of stress over a few weeks and then back off for a week recover and repeat. Read Friel's Training Bible for more details.
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Old 07-12-11, 01:20 PM   #8
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To get a better handle on your training state, start taking your morning resting heart rates every day and putting them in your electronic training log so you can graph them. Take your lying down resting heart rate first, then stand up and record your heart rate after you have been standing 2 minutes. This latter HR is the most indicative of training stress. After you've done this for a few weeks, you'll be able to get up in the morning knowing what you should and shouldn't do that day. If my resting HR goes up by 6-8 beats, I should rest. If my standing HR goes up by 10 beats I'm overtrained. As others have said, the longer you've trained the more training you can tolerate.
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Old 07-12-11, 03:18 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by chasm54 View Post
OK, in eleven days you've done 161 miles, but your total mileage for the year is only 725. So that implies that you have recently increased your mileage quite dramatically, given that in the first six months of the year you'd done less than 600 in total. Why would you be surprised that this results in fatigue? You need to adjust to a higher mileage load. In my view the number of days on which you are cycling is very much a secondary consideration.
... and in April, I learned to ride a bicycle. I hit the pavement a lot before mid-May. Ground is not as hard as you think it is.

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To get a better handle on your training state, start taking your morning resting heart rates every day and putting them in your electronic training log so you can graph them.
You lost me. What's all this?
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Old 07-12-11, 05:32 PM   #10
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... and in April, I learned to ride a bicycle. I hit the pavement a lot before mid-May. Ground is not as hard as you think it is.



You lost me. What's all this?
Rather than go on at length about a very complicated subject, here are a couple of links to get you started:
http://www.sport-fitness-advisor.com...-exercise.html
http://www.rice.edu/~jenky/sports/overtraining.html

What I do is every morning I get up and pee and then lie down with my transmitter on and allow my HR to settle down for a few minutes, maybe 3-5 minutes. It's important to think peaceful, calming thoughts. Never think about riding. Meditating on the outbreath is also good. I then remember what the lowest consistent reading was. I then stand up and remember what my HR settled down to after 2 minutes of standing. I include those measurements in my training log.

Usually my morning resting heart rate (MRHR) will be lowest after a couple of rest days. I'm usually at about 48, though I have friends who are in the lower 40s. Some people are even lower. More frequently, trained athletes see numbers in the lower 50s. That's kind of fun if I go in for a physical. The nurse gives me a funny look.

As the second link above says, your MRHR can go up and down for several reasons. Intervals can drop the MRHR. However being really tired usually raises it. I think the standing HR is the more important one to look at, but it's good to take both as a check. A Finnish researcher recently published a study showing that the standing HR is a better predictor of overtraining. Here's a link discussing the study:
http://www.pponline.co.uk/encyc/0410.htm

I don't do it so fancily. Don't think it's really necessary. I also don't find the 15 second HR to be that indicative. Too much variation.
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Old 07-13-11, 05:34 PM   #11
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There is wisdom in 909rider's and chasm54's posts. There's plenty of information in your posts to support the conclusion that you need rest, and that you need to train.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bluefoxicy View Post
Ee. In 11 days I've done wha .. 161 miles, about 14.5 per day average, though I've had 30 mile days and 3 mile days, and 2 days I haven't biked. Still, it's weird to me. I wake up exhausted as hell, I'm all "I'm not getting out of bed today..."
OK, you're mentally tough enough to ride even when you don't feel like it. But since you wake up "exhausted as hell," your body is telling you that you need more rest.

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As for my "ceiling," I can commute to work every single day for 2 weeks straight. I would figure that my body wouldn't have enough endurance to go half a month and then demand rest; if it can keep things in line for 14 days straight, it should be able to do so indefinitely. That I can have an endurance of 2 weeks just like I can have an endurance of 2 days confuses me, since 2 weeks is plenty enough time for my body to build up if it can handle the load it's under, and thus it should be able to grow to meet demands in real time.
Wrong. OK, so (as you post down thread) you just learned to ride a couple of months ago. Your average is about an hour a day. Were you doing strenuous aerobic exercise for an hour a day up until May? If not, you need to adapt to the load you're putting on your body. It's one thing to say you can ride two hours at a time. But it's completely different to be able to do that every day. It's something you'll have to get used to.

So get more sleep (even though the 10:00 shows are the most interesting on TV). Take a day off to recover every week -- and that does not include whitewater rafting, trail running, or even shopping all day at the mall.

As many of us have learned the hard way, if you don't rest, riding isn't as much fun. Then after some time off, it becomes fun again. After one goes through enough cycles of that, one sometimes figures it out. Learn from those of us who've been there, done that, and it'll be much easier for you.
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Old 07-13-11, 09:50 PM   #12
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you overloaded, time to back off for a few days or a week. GOOD JOB!

my first base rides this year for 2 hours were brutal, now I can ride 3 hour monster group rides without feeling hungry. I heart training>
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