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Training & Nutrition Learn how to develop a training schedule that's good for you. What should you eat and drink on your ride? Learn everything you need to know about training and nutrition here.

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Old 01-12-12, 04:25 PM   #1
misterha
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Overtraining in the Winter?

As I was talking to a friend about winter training and he mentioned that you should go long and slow, not goiing into high intensity workouts. He told me the reasoning behind that is that you want to build base endurance now, and towards the spring spring focus on power and be primed to race in the summer.

His reasoning seems to make sense but I want some other inputs as well. Any thoughts?

Just some background info, I started cycling in August 2011 my goal is to race cat 4 by the end of summer.
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Old 01-12-12, 04:33 PM   #2
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is there a reason that you cant stay at or around the same level year round? is it really needed to become slower over winter? The change in temp kinda forces this upon me but my first race this year comes up 3/31 and I have concerns that I'm going to be in lousy shape for it
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Old 01-12-12, 05:50 PM   #3
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is there a reason that you cant stay at or around the same level year round? is it really needed to become slower over winter? The change in temp kinda forces this upon me but my first race this year comes up 3/31 and I have concerns that I'm going to be in lousy shape for it
Staying at one level all year is easy. Staying at a peak or high level is not possible, physically or mentally.

Generally you train in cycles starting with a strong base built with high volume and moderate intensity followed by increasing intensity eventually building to a peak. If you live in a colder climate, most riders will not be in peak form for the first race of the season so you'll have some company. Those who are in peak form for the first race won't be at the end of the season. It's up to you to prioritize which are the important races for you to focus on.
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Old 01-13-12, 02:00 AM   #4
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Above is correct. Also the energy required for harder efforts like Threshold, V02 max intervals and hard racing require lots more recovery time. As a result the pure volume of endurance training must suffer. So gradually aerobic capacity will drop as the season develops. It is possible to prioritise two to three segments and taper and peak for them and have a micro prep stage again. I would suggest once you get your racing cleats on let your racing be the training and just top up in between. Prior to race 1 count back 6 weeks and start Threshold intervals building gradually to 2/3 x 20 min steady state intervals at threshold etc. And lots of cadence with the efforts!
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Old 01-14-12, 03:23 PM   #5
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Thanks frr the tip everyone I'll try researching a bit more on this topic and figure out a training regiment fit for me.
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Old 01-15-12, 04:22 PM   #6
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As a result the pure volume of endurance training must suffer. So gradually aerobic capacity will drop as the season develops.
I don't understand why aerobic capacity would drop if a person is doing threshold/vo2max intervals, both of which are supposed to provide a greater training stimulus to aerobic capacity than a high volume, low intensity approach. In fact, the more I explore this whole training thing (granted, via the internet...) the more skeptical I become of the traditional "LSD" method of building base.
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Old 01-15-12, 06:43 PM   #7
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I don't understand why aerobic capacity would drop if a person is doing threshold/vo2max intervals, both of which are supposed to provide a greater training stimulus to aerobic capacity than a high volume, low intensity approach. In fact, the more I explore this whole training thing (granted, via the internet...) the more skeptical I become of the traditional "LSD" method of building base.
Your general fitness drops primarily because of the hard racing. You need to be relatively 'fresh' for the races so you need to cut back on volume.
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Old 01-15-12, 07:15 PM   #8
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Your general fitness drops primarily because of the hard racing. You need to be relatively 'fresh' for the races so you need to cut back on volume.
Ah, gotcha.
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Old 01-16-12, 01:43 AM   #9
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I notice the same thing every summer when I do long, fast rides in the mountains. They take so much out of me that it's all I can do to recover for the next weekend. So all summer, I gradually get weaker, though I gain ability to do pass repeats, and in general keep up a fast average for a long time. It does seem like a paradox, but there it is. Wouldn't happen except that I tend to do that sort of thing every summer weekend that it isn't raining.
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