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Training & Nutrition Learn how to develop a training schedule that's good for you. What should you eat and drink on your ride? Learn everything you need to know about training and nutrition here.

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Old 02-12-12, 03:49 PM   #1
worldtraveller
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add weight to the bike have benefits

Would adding extra weight to the bike have any benefits to training?

such as filling up a water bottle full of rocks etc, and more weights on the bike to make it heavier on hills. have any benefits?

such as ride like that in spring then in summer, lighten the load?
thanks
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Old 02-12-12, 03:54 PM   #2
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Couldn't you just pedal in a higher-than-usual gear instead to get the same (negligible, according to Coggan) effect?
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Old 02-12-12, 04:53 PM   #3
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No. You can just pedal harder and achieve the same result. Your power output isn't determined by the weight of your bike.
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Old 02-12-12, 07:20 PM   #4
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Would adding extra weight to the bike have any benefits to training?

such as filling up a water bottle full of rocks etc, and more weights on the bike to make it heavier on hills. have any benefits?

such as ride like that in spring then in summer, lighten the load?
thanks
You can always go faster or use a harder gear. But riding a heavy "clunker" bike could enhance your workout if riding with folks significantly slower than you. I give one of my riding buddies a real workout when he rides his 20 year old Pioneer or his Mongoose. When he is on his Trek Y-Foil I am working to stay with him.

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Old 02-12-12, 07:26 PM   #5
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Maybe if your bike weighed 100 lbs. or so. Or maybe not. How many loaded tourers have you seen pounding their anaerobic limits up a long hill? Not so many. One's more likely to really go on a bike that's fun.

I've been riding a tandem with my wife for the past couple of years - I figure it's the same effort as a 114 lb. loaded tourer because of the difference in our wattages, but a lot more fun. We can go if we want to. Has it made me stronger? Maybe. I went out on my single on a group ride today for the first time in two years. I was an anaerobic monster. I felt like Marco on a good day. I didn't try any aerobic attacks, trying to save my legs as we'd done 105k on the tandem the day before. So maybe, but OTOH that means acquiring a tandeming spouse and spending several thou on a good bike, which may or may not fit in with the rest of your lifestyle plans. But my advice is to get right on it. Forget adding rocks to your water bottles, that doesn't even begin to cut it.
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Old 02-12-12, 09:16 PM   #6
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Just put some drops on a MTB with knobbies, and you'll be a beast when you switch back to the road bike.
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Old 02-13-12, 06:03 AM   #7
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Pulling more weight on a prescribed route of set distance means you'll either pedal harder or longer, or more likely, a combination of both. I don't see how this would not make you stronger.
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Old 02-13-12, 02:21 PM   #8
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If nothing else, it will lower your perceived exertion when you switch back to light. I basically do this with heavy tubes and low pressure tires for winter training. Put on those light high pressure racing tires and zoom-zoom.
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Old 02-13-12, 06:15 PM   #9
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Pulling more weight on a prescribed route of set distance means you'll either pedal harder or longer, or more likely, a combination of both. I don't see how this would not make you stronger.
Or you could skip the weight, ride the same time and go a little farther with the identical result.
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Old 02-13-12, 06:25 PM   #10
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cant you just try to gain weight (muscle mass) and then lose weight and be even a stronger rider once you lost all that weight?
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Old 02-13-12, 06:44 PM   #11
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Or you could skip the weight, ride the same time and go a little farther with the identical result.
Pffft. I'm pretty sure rocks in the water bottle was one of Lance's little known training secrets.
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Old 02-19-12, 09:08 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by worldtraveller View Post
Would adding extra weight to the bike have any benefits to training?

such as filling up a water bottle full of rocks etc, and more weights on the bike to make it heavier on hills. have any benefits?

such as ride like that in spring then in summer, lighten the load?
thanks
It might put extra stress on your knee joint and stuff. I don't think you want to do that. The tendency would be to alleviate the stress by shifting to a lower gear. That said, you might as well not add the extra weight to begin with. What's the sense of trying to get stronger and potentially hurting the knees in the process?
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Old 02-20-12, 07:19 AM   #13
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I assume I'd just shift to a lower gear at about the same resistance, so all that would change would be more cycles. It would be the same as a slightly longer ride.
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Old 02-21-12, 09:15 PM   #14
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let some air out of your tires, too.
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Old 02-25-12, 05:04 AM   #15
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You could also look at wearing a weighted vest.. I use the golds gym model from walmart.. You can add up to 20lb max - has 20 pockets for weights - 1lb each, so you can add more weight as you see fit.. Never used on the bike, but I run with it so it will stay in place..

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Gold-s-Gym...-Vest/14894526

They also have a model at walmart up to 40lbs max and have seen 75lb models at local sports shops..
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Old 02-25-12, 05:25 AM   #16
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Gaspard-Gustave de Coriolis rolls over in his grave every time someone starts a thread like this.

Last edited by Thulsadoom; 02-25-12 at 05:29 AM.
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Old 02-25-12, 10:04 AM   #17
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Quote:
Would adding extra weight to the bike have any benefits to training?
Whatever training effect or resulting cycling effort would be targeted to overcoming the weight you add. Traditional exercise physiology thinking would not see this kind of training as beneficial as simply trying to ride your bike faster.
(this comment assumes your goal is to ride your bicycle faster)

Since you don't state your actual goal - this thread doesn't have reason to be for or against how you spend your time or "weight" your bicycle.

My own perspective is to load my bicycle with equipment that keeps me safe and comfortable. From a purely "racer perspective" - this would mean using heavier training wheels and tires, and packing plenty of training foods and drinks.
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Old 02-29-12, 07:53 AM   #18
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Probably quite marginal effect if you can´t put on a lot of weight and your training rides are really hilly. It would be better to have tires with higher roller resistance or really non-aero wheels!
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Old 03-10-12, 10:34 AM   #19
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We had a guy who filled a water bottle with nuts and bolts. He hit a pothole and ripped the water bottle mounts out of the frame ruining the frame.
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