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  1. #1
    Newbie UpSbLiViOn's Avatar
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    Question: Bicycle Training Stands

    My family and I are looking to pick up a Bicycle Training stand for spinning and am curious what one's are good. Best stability, resistance, durability etc.

    Thanks for your time
    UpS

  2. #2
    Bike ≠ Car ≠ Ped. BarracksSi's Avatar
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    Kurt Kinetic. /end thread

    Well, that's the simple answer, and it's one option I could consider buying again if I got stuck someplace where riding anytime was impractical. Good resistance that simulates the real world well enough (30 mph kicks my butt just as much on the KK as it does on the road), nukeproof resistance unit, good warranty & service (or so I've heard). I don't think I'd bother with another brand for that style of trainer.

    Two other ideas -- rollers (dozens of models out there, but I like the idea of "free motion" versions that are more forgiving of rider movement), or a CompuTrainer setup.
    http://www.racermateinc.com/computrainer.asp

    Rollers are best for working on your form, and a CompuTrainer can track your power output and even simulate hills with automatically varying resistance according to programmed course profiles.

  3. #3
    Senior Member clydeosaur's Avatar
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    I'd go with Kurt Kinetic or Cyclops fluid trainers as my first option. both well built with the best warranty service I've seen / heard. Second would be the same companies but with a magnetic trainer. I've seen some nice Blackburn ones as well.

  4. #4
    Senior Member tylerwal's Avatar
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    I have a Travel Trac Fluid that I'm very happy with, actually picked it up used

  5. #5
    Senior Member Breathegood's Avatar
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    I have both a CycleOps Fluid2 and a Kurt Kinetic Rock and Roll trainer. They are both great. I have a bike dedicated to the trainer so some of the wear and tear issues may be a little more pronounced for someone who is constantly swapping bikes or removing a bike to ride outside.

    I've put about 2500 miles on the Fluid2 in three years. It's been bombproof for me. I've read a lot of reviews that say this trainer is prone to leakage, but that has not been my experience. The platform is stable, and the mounting system and drum adjustments are simple and intuitive. It is all one piece (once assembled), and the legs fold in when not in use so that it is reasonably compact and can be easily stored. I can spin as high a cadence as I want and it is as stable as can be. I now have it set up for my wife. I would still be using it 3-5 days a week if she hadn't asked for her own setup.

    This January I picked up the KK Rock and Roll trainer because my wife wanted her own and I've been curious about this trainer for some time now. The R&R is a high quality product. The base is W I D E and stable. You need space to both use and store this trainer. The resistance is slightly less than the Fluid2, but it has a more natural feel to it. The rocking motion makes time on the trainer a lot more comfortable than a static trainer. It has adjustable pre-load for the lateral stiffness, so it can be fine tuned to your needs. Even though the resistance is lighter, I find this trainer gives me a more total workout. It forces you to use your core muscles to center the bike, and it gives you the option for out-of-the saddle training (although, I've tried it and there is nothing natural feeling about being out of the saddle on it). Mounting and drum adjustment is not quite as simple as the Fluid2, but it is still pretty easy (I would be less inclined to taking the bike on and off the KK trainers). The one complaint I have about the R&R is that high cadence-low resistance spins are kind of scary. I'm 6'1" and 205lbs. At 100-105rpm, I can keep a pretty steady cadence, but when I start getting up to around 110, it starts bouncing so violently that I don't feel safe maintaining pace. Maybe I need to work on my technique, but I don't have this problem on the Fluid2. I have seen other reviews with similar comments.

    I know that comparing these two products is not exactly apples to apples, but if I were shopping for a static fluid trainer, both KK and CO make great units. The KK is guarunteed against leakage, but like I said, this hasn't been an issue for me on the CO. My personal preference is for the simple setup and compact design of the CO trainer, but with a dedicated bike it's not really an issue. The KK has a little more natural feel, but takes a higher gear to get the same kind of workout.
    1991 Trek 8700 - SS conversion, 2009 Gary Fisher "Kaitai", 2009 Raleigh Team, 2012 Raleigh Twin Six,1996 Cannondale SR500

  6. #6
    Senior Member fstshrk's Avatar
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    kurt kinetic

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    Quote Originally Posted by Breathegood View Post
    I know that comparing these two products is not exactly apples to apples, but if I were shopping for a static fluid trainer, both KK and CO make great units. The KK is guarunteed against leakage, but like I said, this hasn't been an issue for me on the CO. My personal preference is for the simple setup and compact design of the CO trainer, but with a dedicated bike it's not really an issue. The KK has a little more natural feel, but takes a higher gear to get the same kind of workout.
    The Kurt Kinetic Road Machine (the "static" version) would be an apples to apples comparison.

    I bought a Kinetic (Road Machine) last spring and have been very pleased with it. I now have 2000mi on it, most of those over this last winter. I tried a CycleOps mag unit before the KK, and found having to manually adjust the resistance to be too inconvenient.

    My reading reviews on the net said the road feel of the KK was better than the Fluid2, and that the KK resistance stayed consistent over time (vs. the Fluid2 that would change resistance as it got hot). I liked that the KK had a published power curve and that I could reliably correlate speed to power which would allow for power-based workouts without the need for a powermeter on the bike.

    I did find that the add-on 12lbs flywheel really smoothed out the ride for steady efforts. It makes holding an exact speed/power much easier which feels good to my legs, though probably really only a benefit when it comes to looking at the ride data later. The extra flywheel probably smooths out the ride too much for things like one-legged pedaling drills, but I'm happy enough to leave it on most of the time.

    I have an old carbon fiber full suspension MTB (it fit a 700c wheel) dedicated to the trainer, and am very happy not to have to swap a bike onto/off of it. Added benefit is its worn out pivots and flexiness (which makes it a terrible MTB bike compared to what's modern) softens up the ride, though nothing like I've seen a Rock and Roll do.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by BarracksSi View Post
    Kurt Kinetic. /end thread

    Well, that's the simple answer, and it's one option I could consider buying again if I got stuck someplace where riding anytime was impractical. Good resistance that simulates the real world well enough (30 mph kicks my butt just as much on the KK as it does on the road), nukeproof resistance unit, good warranty & service (or so I've heard). I don't think I'd bother with another brand for that style of trainer.

    Two other ideas -- rollers (dozens of models out there, but I like the idea of "free motion" versions that are more forgiving of rider movement), or a CompuTrainer setup.
    http://www.racermateinc.com/computrainer.asp

    Rollers are best for working on your form, and a CompuTrainer can track your power output and even simulate hills with automatically varying resistance according to programmed course profiles.
    this. and rollers.

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