Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Mississauga, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    6
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Training schedule for a 200 km ride over 2 days (100 km each day)

    Hello

    I am looking for a training schedule for a ride that is 100 km, 2 days in a row. This is not a race so I am not concerned with how fast I do it, I just have to train for the distance. I have looked online and cannot find anything.

    Details:
    -The ride is June 9 & 10, so I have 11 weeks from now to build up the distance.
    -100 km the first day, 100 km the second day
    -I've started riding outside now that the weather is getting better here in Ontario. I've started at 25 km for the last 2 weeks. Going to increase to 35 or 40 km this weekend.

    -The ride schedule given to me by the event coordinators goes by TIME on the road. I don't like that, I prefer to know what km's i'm doing each week and it doesn't matter to me how long it takes. The event is not a race, so we can complete it in our own time.

    -Should I build up to 100 km at some point in the next 11 weeks, or is this like a marathon where you don't necessarily run 42k before the race?

    -Also, since I'll be riding 100 km for 2 days in a row, how many times should I ride 2 days in a row during my training?

    -I'm just not sure how fast to build up, if I should try riding 100km 2 days in a row PRIOR to the event, and where to build in rest days and tapering. Rest days and tapering are important to me since I don't want to get injured before the event.

    -I wish I could just find a schedule that is already done up for me, but I haven't been able to find anything.

    Any help you can give would be greatly appreciated. If anyone has a schedule, I can give you my email address to send it to me.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    323
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Cycling is very different from long distance running in that it's a low-impact activity. In marathon training, you try to ramp up gradually to the event and you don't try to run 42k before the race because there is a high risk of injuries if you do otherwise. In cycling, that's generally not a problem. If you have a properly fitted bicycle and you're accustomed to sitting on it for several hours straight without major discomfort, it is not difficult to increase your distance quickly to 100 km or more, just using your body as a guide.

    Try to get to 100 km as soon as possible and ride that distance every weekend. On top of that, do at least two 1-2 hour intensive rides during the week.

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    18
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    +1

    You're unlikely to get injured training on a properly fitted bike. (Please do be sure to have someone check your fit - even if it's just an experienced friend or acquaintance)

    Time is actually more important on a bike than km. A lot of extraneous factors can make a given distance harder or easier (e.g., a rolling 10km ride is significantly harder than a flat 10km ride). In general, time will give you a better measure of the amount of strain you actually put on your body.

    You didn't say what type of terrain this ride will cover. If it involves a significant amount of climbing, you will want to work some climbing into your training.

    Also, I feel it's very important to get used to riding two consecutive days. In particular, make sure that you're used to riding the day after a hard ride - it can feel a little different than riding when completely fresh.

    It's not necessary to ride the exact distance of the ride prior to the event, but it might not hurt to try it. 100km (if flat) is not that long a distance to go.

    w.r.t. rest days and tapering. Tapering is not necessary unless you're racing. Rest days: It sounds like you're primarily riding on the weekend - as long as you're not riding more than 5 days a week, you should be getting plenty of rest. In fact, if you're only riding on the weekend, I'd advocate trying to do a mid-week ride or two, even if they're only a half hour.

    Also, you may want to try doing some group rides. There are big benefits to be gained in riding in groups where you can draft a little. Most larger riding events will have enough riders that little groups will form - it's best to have some experience riding in groups prior to the event.

  4. #4
    Travelling hopefully chasm54's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Uncertain
    Posts
    6,424
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    100km per day for two successive days sounds intimidating, but really isn't. Further is much, much easier than faster, so if you are not concerned with how fast you do it, you will have no problem in developing that level of endurance in the time available.

    Nor do you need any elaborate training schedule. Just ride as much as you can, gradually increasing your time on the bike at a pace you can sustain. If you are working at low intensity, and it sounds as if that is your intention, rest days and tapering really don't matter.

    Build the mileage so that a couple of weeks before the event you ride 70 or 80 Km per day on successive days. If you can do that, you can do the 100s.
    There have been many days when I haven't felt like riding, but there has never been a day when I was sorry I rode.

  5. #5
    jmX
    jmX is offline
    Senior Member jmX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Orange, CA
    My Bikes
    Roubaix / Shiv
    Posts
    2,123
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I think the posts have summed it up quite nicely. This should be an easy task. All you need to do is get your butt adjusted to sitting on the saddle for 4-5 hours in a row, and that will come with you just riding around.

    I'd certainly try and ride 100km a few times, maybe even every weekend starting in a 4-5 weeks if you have the time. It's really not that hard to pedal nearly forever at a slow pace.

    PS, whenever friends/family come to visit, I try and have them get on my guest bike and we go for a ride. Everybody thinks they will only go ~8-10km and be done, but we go 40km and they usually feel fine after. These are people that dont exercise at all, and havent ridden bikes in 20 years. You can probably do a lot more than you think.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    323
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You're unlikely to get injured training on a properly fitted bike.
    Technically, you still can. Problems with neck and back are most common. But they aren't nearly as common as running injuries. I recall reading that even experienced serious long distance runners average one major leg/foot injury every two years (the kind of injury that will prevent you from running for a month or two.)

    Here's a short table to help check the proper bicycle fit
    http://www.aafp.org/afp/2001/0515/p2...010515p2007-t3

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •