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  1. #1
    Meow! my58vw's Avatar
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    Body reaction to intervals? Heartrate?

    I just decided to jump in and do my first set of intervals on a bike ever. I mean actually go as hard as possible to certain time period.

    I did 1x 3 ratio intervals, 30 seconds off the saddle, 39 seconds on, increasing cadence on the saddle, 3 minutes to E1 and repeat. I did four sets of the 1x3 intervals, spent 22 minutes of the bike, 5 minutes of warm up and 5 minutes of cool down.

    Now my reaction. My HR took 1 minute to drop from 179 (zone 5a - 5b) to 162 (zone 4) and 2.5 minutes to E1 (135 BPM). My max HR was 182 BPM (zone 5c). I was definitly anarobic past 173 BPM and was breathing hard down to 165 or so after I stopped interval, my guess is catching up on breath from the interval. At the 4th interval I could almost not finish, muscles were actually tired enough not to be able to push 39 - 11 on the trainer.

    It took me about 15 minutes off the bike to return to normal after I layed down and consumed my recovery drink.

    Is this a normal reaction for first time intervals or am I going too hard. I felt dizzy once I got off the bike and for a few minutes after. I was covered in sweat. I think the dizzyness has to do with me not consuming enough water. I definitly need at least 48 oz before this type of workout, I do sweat alot anyway.

    Thanks in advance.
    Just your average club rider... :)

  2. #2
    Senior Member Chongo's Avatar
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    I'm no expert, but yes intervals feel like hell. They are something you want to ease into and there are many variations in the types of intervals that can be done. Each type depends upon what you want to improve in. In general, the more intense the interval, the shorter the interval time and visa versa. You should start out by doing some moderate intervals like 3 sets of 1 minute at 85-90% of your max heart rate then 1 to 2 min recovery. As you get used to them, you can increase the number of intervals in the set and the duration of the interval. Be careful with them; they can lead to overtraining. Some coaches don't advise more than 2 interval sessions a week with good recovery time in between. It's best to get a coach of at least a good training book by coaches like Joe Friel and Chris Carmichael to learn about the many types of intervals that can be done and how often to do them. From what you wrote, it seems like you are going too hard and maybe didn't hydrate enough. Were these done indoors? If so you need a good fan and lots of sports drink.

  3. #3
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    The rule of thumb is the longer it takes for you to recover from an effort during an interval, the less fit you are. If you have to take a long time after you finish your workout to recover, then it may be time to see a doctor.

    Your 15 minute post recovery doesn't seem so bad. But 2 and a half minutes to drop 40 beats seems a bit much.

    You'll find over time, though, that you'll be able to drop your heart rate. Or it may be that your recovery time for your interval isn't long enough.

    If you're going to do anaerobic intervals, it should be about 1:2 at the least. So if you do a 30 second work effort anaerobic, your recovery time should be a minute. Within that minute, you should be able to drop your heart rate quickly. The quicker you drop that heart rate, the more time your body can recover, so when you start your next interval, your body is ready to go. If you did that 30 second effort (this is just an example), and it took the full minute to get your heart rate down, really... you won't have enough recovery time to do the next effort.

    Don't push intervals. They should be progressive, and it should reflect how well you worked with your conditioning phase of your training. If your intervals suck (for lack of a better word), you'll have to go back to the basics.

    Good luck.

    Koffee

  4. #4
    rider of small bicycles geneman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by koffee brown
    The rule of thumb ...snip ... Good luck.

    Koffee
    For the love of all that is decent in this world, please dump that avatar. She (and her devil brood) gives me the willies.

    -mark

  5. #5
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    I'm thinking about it. I just don't want to hear anymore remarks about having a sexually suggestive avatar anymore, when clearly, the Eartha Kitt avatar was nothing of the sort.

    Condi's had a good run, but I'm looking to other black women out there I can replace her face with.

    Koffee

  6. #6
    Meow! my58vw's Avatar
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    I relized this morning that I did not hydrate enough. I think I did go to far and I will plan my intervals better and ease into them better. Something was up yesterday, I was not feeling very good the whole day. I did a nice base mile ride on the trainer today and my HR was dropping nice and quick.

    How do you get your HR to drop faster? Is is a function of fitness (i.e. gets better as you train? I am going to try standing 30 second to 1 minute rest intervals right now. I have read the cyclist training bible and I do not want to really start long intervals yet (i.e. cruise intervals, etc) and focus on short bursts of speed vs long muscular endurance.

    As to hydration I usually take in at least 48 oz water before any workout and at least 24 oz between.

    How many sessions does it usually take to safely increase the length or number of intervals? Is it based on how you are feeling after the last one in a set or do you plan to do one more than last time?

    Yes I am relizing that intervals are hard... I guest do not want to be like yesterday where I go so far that I feel wasted afterwards... I just do not think that if I do not do them now and through out the coming months and focus only on base that I will not be ready for march crits. I will probably just cut them down to 1 day a week for a couple of weeks to get my body used to them and go from there.

    Thanks again... expecially for helping out a racing NOOB!
    Just your average club rider... :)

  7. #7
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    For the love of all that is decent in this world, please dump that avatar. She (and her devil brood) gives me the willies.
    Can we please not hijack threads for unwarranted statements on personal political beliefs? It's tiresome.

  8. #8
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    If you don't have the aerobic base, it doesn't matter how many intervals you do. You'll never be able to recover sufficiently. That's why it's so important to do your base training and your endurance training BEFORE you attempt doing your interval training. This can take weeks or months to get to interval training, depending on how fit you are. With an adequate aerobic base, you'll start seeing your recovery time drop after you've finished the work effort. When that happens, you know you're fitter. Until then, if you continue to have a difficult time dropping heart rate, either you're not structuring your intervals correctly and you need to revamp your interval training, or you don't have the aerobic base to do the intervals yet.

    It gets frustrating telling people they haven't trained base enough, only to see them ignore what you're saying and go right back to interval training without doing anything to develop their fitness. It won't be surprising if the riding season is lackluster.

    Take the training back to the basics.

    Koffee

  9. #9
    Meow! my58vw's Avatar
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    You are so right... I probably am not ready for intervals yet then and I should just do base for a few more months to get ready for them. That is probably why I am not recovering as fast as I want to. Training is a learning experience and I am learning as we go.

    I was reading the "cyclist training bible" and discovered that the kind of anarobic intervals I was trying were not recomended until there is a big base after a few years. After I get though base training I will work on longer intervals and stay away from the anarobic intervals for now. I do not believe I have the arobic base yet to be able to do them efficitivly.

    Thanks for all the info and helping me redefine my program....
    Just your average club rider... :)

  10. #10
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    I don't think you need to spend several months on base. If you did, you wouldn't be able to get to the riding season!

    What would help you is to map out your 12 month training season (including 2 months for your off time). In that 10 months left, try to figure out how much will be dedicated to training, and then from there, figure out how much time you're going to spend on each training type (ie base, endurance, intervals, etc.). From there, start your training, but be aware of your progression. If you are progressing well, you can advance. But if you're having a hard time progressing, your schedule needs to be revamped to incorporate your weak points.

    Try another 3 weeks of base training, then move to endurance for another 3- 4 weeks. After that, I think you'll be better ready for intervals. But now... it's just too early in anyone's training season to be looking at interval training. You'll peak way too early, and your season will cut short somewhere around early July.

    Koffee

  11. #11
    Meow! my58vw's Avatar
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    Thank You again for the advice. 3 more weeks of base sounds good. After that I will reasess where I am and go from there. I have until late March to peak so I can not spend a whole bunch of time in base. We will see how it goes...

    Thank You as always.
    Just your average club rider... :)

  12. #12
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    Whoa... late March.... you've got that race? Is that you?

    If so, you could time it so that you spend the rest of Jan. doing base. Then Feb, switch over to doing endurance long rides. March, move into strength. By the end of March, you can incorporate the intervals in, and you can use your race for working on your VO2 max. Then April, do your intervals. May, add in the speedwork and high intensity rides. That will take you to June, and you'll be ready to do some serious racing.

    Of course, this is the simplistic way of looking at it. Since you want to keep your conditioning, you have to do "microperiodizing" so you can peak a few times. Then it just becomes necessary to get a coach if you're that serious.

    Koffee

  13. #13
    Meow! my58vw's Avatar
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    Ya that is me, first race in March, the several at the beginning and several at the end of summer.

    I am looking into a coach right now but it is quite expensive for me now so it will probably have to wait until next year (06')...
    Just your average club rider... :)

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