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  1. #1
    Junior Member beauy46's Avatar
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    Morning Breakfast before ride??

    I am pretty new to the sport/cycling. For the most part most of my riding/training will be in the mornings for about 10miles+(and progressively add to the distance).
    I have heard good things about Oat Meal, Fruit, and Coffee. But basically looking for something my stomach can hold and not upchuck.

  2. #2
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    For rides under a couple of hours in the morning you can eat before or after the ride without a problem. I usually have oatmeal for breakfast but have also have had french toast, pancakes, bagels. Basically anything I would normally eat for breakfast. Since I never do very high intensity at the start of the ride I don't really pay attention to timing of when I eat before riding.

  3. #3
    Senior Member rumrunn6's Avatar
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    scrambled egg sandwich; or toaster waffles, or quick mix pancakes
    cycling is like baseball ~ it doesn't take much to make it interesting

  4. #4
    Senior Member travelerman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rumrunn6 View Post
    scrambled egg sandwich; or toaster waffles, or quick mix pancakes
    Speaking for myself, I can't eat eggs before a ride... I tend to taste them again after some moderate exertion. On the other hand...
    Ten miles or so of moderate intensity should not - as previous posters have indicated - cause large gastronomic issues, unless you overeat. For a medium-intensity ride of under-35 miles, I will usually go with a banana and/or granola bar, if I am riding within an hour after eating; for longer rides, I bring food with me.

  5. #5
    Galveston County Texas 10 Wheels's Avatar
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    100 mile breakfast
    [SIZE=1][B]What I like about Texas[/B]
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    Set F1re To The Ra1n ( NY Night Rain Ride)
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  6. #6
    Legs; OK! Lungs; not! bobthib's Avatar
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    I avoid coffee or any other diuretic as it is dehydrating and makes me want to pee.

    As far as nutrition goes, I'm on a ketogenic diet (LCHF: Low Carb, High Fat) and the great thing about it is you don't need to worry about "carbo loading" or eating GU etc. I like to tell my fellow riders, I burning diesel (fat) you're burning gasoline (glucose.)

    A nice breakfast like 10 wheels (minus the coffee for me) is all you need. And I don't worry about eating along the way. I won't need it. A good hard ride burns 800 - 1,000 cals an hr. Even the an athlete with 8% body fat has over 40,000 cals of fat available.

    The down side is a ketogenic diet is very dehydrating so LOTS and LOTS of hydration and electrolytes are required.
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  7. #7
    Senior Member rdtompki's Avatar
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    For short(er) rides, under 40 miles, I'll have oatmeal/cream of wheat, banana and coffee. For longer rides I'll be sure to eat a good and early dinner and maybe add wheat toast or pancakes to the breakfast, above.
    Rick T
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  8. #8
    Junior Member beauy46's Avatar
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    Thanks for some of the tid bits. The 100 Mile Breakfast looks GOOD

  9. #9
    Senior Member Koobazaur's Avatar
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    I used to think I can't bike on an empty stomach in the morning - I'd have no energy and feel like death as soon as I hit any incline. But when I started eating more in general (especially for a few days before) I noticed that changed - I could easily get up, drink some water, and hop on my bike for the next half hour with full energy and vigor, even i my tummy was growling. So, in my experience, overall balanced and filling diet has a greater impact than just a pre-ride bulk.

    But I am also talking 5-10mi morning commute, not 100 milers.

  10. #10
    LET'S ROLL 1nterceptor's Avatar
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    Everybody is different from you, what works for me may not
    work for you. You may have to experiment a bit to see what
    works for you. I get up at 5:30am and start riding to work at
    6am for 17 miles, 4 days a week. I'm not hungry when I get
    up so I don't eat anything before I ride. When I get to work
    I usually eat a granola or protein bar. Just did a 106 mile
    century ride last Sunday, just had 1 bagel with creamcheese
    and some water for breakfast. Same thing with the last century
    I did.

  11. #11
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    in the hot summer this worked best for me

    Instant oatmeal with milk, and dried blueberries, cherries and cranberry for sweetness.

    A Banana

    1/4 cantaloupe or nice slice of watermelon.

    If it is a weekend ride of a few miles I add 2 hard boiled eggs, with black pepper and salt.

    2 strips of crisp bacon well drained.

    You can substitute 2 slices of whole wheat toast with butter and jelly for the oatmeal. There is a Jalapeno Raspberry jelly I love.

    I have allergies and often a bit of lung mucus and nasal congestion to get rid of. I have some very hot peanuts that I will eat 2 or 3 before I leave. They drain sinus I never knew I had.

    I may cough up some stuff in the first mile if I have not ridden in a while. In the bad season I use antihistamines.

    Rod

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobthib View Post
    A nice breakfast like 10 wheels (minus the coffee for me) is all you need. And I don't worry about eating along the way. I won't need it. A good hard ride burns 800 - 1,000 cals an hr. Even the an athlete with 8% body fat has over 40,000 cals of fat available.
    If you're burning 1000 Cals/hr very little if any is coming from your fat stores.

  13. #13
    Senior Member mr_pedro's Avatar
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    For me it depends on the time in the morning. If I leave around 6 then all I have is a glass of milk, take a granole bar on the bike and have breakfast when I come back. Leaving around 8 I like to get a milk/yogurt shake with protein powder and fruit. Other times when the bread machine did its work, two slices of bread with egg, ham, turkey, cheese and a glass of milk is also good.

  14. #14
    Don't Believe the Hype RiPHRaPH's Avatar
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    yogurt.
    I have enough words to get me into trouble, but not enough to get me out of trouble.

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    I am too and I bonk like he'll if I don't have carbs on my rides. Five hours in the saddle averaging 155bpm (41 and average conditioning) and I would be toast.

    What are you eating on long rides?

  16. #16
    Coffee Stud
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    The research that "I" buy into and works for "me" is as follows. Any ride under an hour requires no pre ride nutrition. Longer then that and you may need something (personnal choice). More important is eating afterwards (protein/carbs/fat) as soon as possible, which helps you recover faster which improves performance. Also, I believe riding on an empty stomach allows you to start burning your fat stores sooner, which is what many folks want out of biking.

  17. #17
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beauy46 View Post
    For the most part most of my riding/training will be in the mornings for about 10miles+(and progressively add to the distance).

    Since we are NOT talking about going out and riding centuries (100 milers) ...



    For your rides, and other rides under a couple hours, you don't need to eat anything. Ignore all these with their enormous breakfast suggestions. Your stomach doesn't have to deal with food. I would suggest a glass of fruit juice or something like that just for a few calories and, more importantly, hydration.

    I used to commute to work a day or two a week ... my ride was 35 km and took me a little under 1.5 hours. I drank a glass of orange or apple juice before I rode, I had a large bottle of water on board (and would drink about half of it ... 500 ml), and when I got there I'd have a couple pieces of toast. Anything more than that was unnecessary.


    However, one additional suggestion ... if you are going to follow my advice, bring a couple granola bars or oatmeal raisin cookies or something with you ... especially as your rides get longer. You won't be burning 800-1000 calories per hour as someone else suggested, 500-600 calories per hour is a lot more realistic, but if you feel quite hungry at the end of the first hour of riding, a granola bar or cookie can keep you going for a bit longer.

  18. #18
    Space for rent
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    I am a big fan of the "pb&j" sandwich. Little simple carbs, little protein, a little fat. Easy to digest.

  19. #19
    Senior Member NateDieselF4i's Avatar
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    6-8 ice cubes
    cup of milk.
    Cup and a half of steel cut oats (non instant kind)
    tablespoon of peanut bubutter

    Put in blender.
    Blend.
    Drink.
    Enjoy.

    Healthy energy filled breakfast that is easy to make and easier to get down.
    If you're like me, I have trouble getting breakfast down as soon as I wake up a lot if the time.
    2012 Cannondale Supersix 105

    2013 Cannondale Badboy

  20. #20
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    I personally live off of cereals such as alpen, cornflakes, beans on toast and chicken and chips. Alpen and cornflakes being my morning meal. Not sure what you guys would make of the content of these, but they've worked well for me.
    But if you're looking for the 'ideal' 10-15 mile breakfast, Machka is certainly right, you don't need to eat anything. I'd stick to what you eat already (if at all), I would only change my diet from what I enjoy eating if it was exceptionally long duration rides. However, even for 10-15 miles, it won't hurt to drink a little more water. As for the on-ride-snack, I have a mars bar but I don't ride long enough to actually benefit from a snack IMHO (2-4 hours).

  21. #21
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    I've never been a breakfast eater, so for short rides I don't bother. If I'm planning 25+ miles, I'll eat a Cliff bar.

  22. #22
    Commuter & cyclotourist brianogilvie's Avatar
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    Personally, I find I don't need to eat anything unless I'm going out for 40+ miles (at at moderate pace). In that case, I will have cereal with milk or buttered toast, a little fruit, and coffee, then eat something starting at 20 miles and every 10-15 miles thereafter. If I know I have a good lunch stop coming up, I might skip one of those feeds, then take a break for lunch.

    My wife, on the other hand, needs a substantial breakfast and then some food every 10-12 miles or her blood sugar tanks. We're all different. Keep track of what you eat and when, and how you feel, and adjust accordingly. One of the least pleasant rides I ever had was an 80-miler in the Berkshires where I had a black bean and chicken wrap for lunch (about mile 25). I'm not sure whether it was because the wrap had been prepared badly, or just the ingredients not sitting well in my stomach during all those climbs, but I could barely choke down Gatorade and shot blocks for the rest of the ride--a tragedy, since I passed a great ice cream shop on the way home (mostly downhill). I've decided to avoid so much fiber in the future. A good BLT, on the other hand, is an excellent mid-ride meal, if you pass somewhere that does it right.
    Last edited by brianogilvie; 11-04-12 at 05:37 PM. Reason: Omitted a phrase

  23. #23
    Senior Member rumrunn6's Avatar
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    scrambled egg sandwich but not right before the ride.
    cycling is like baseball ~ it doesn't take much to make it interesting

  24. #24
    Senior Member garethzbarker's Avatar
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    When I first started riding bikes I was extremely out of shape and riding without eating was completely out of the question. I would get sick. A lot of this advice is relative to your health level and how hard you are riding. 10 miles can be hard for some people. Also, even now if I go out for a ride completely empty it sometimes causes me to overeat later.
    If you are fit I suggest eating whatever you normally eat like others have and see how you feel.

  25. #25
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    I'm a fairly high-metabolism type of person, and if I don't eat breakfast I really feel it even if I don't do any exercise. Unfortunately, I tend not to be very hungry right when I wake up, so it's a tough one to reconcile.

    I've found that protein/fruit smoothies go down pretty easily even when I have to force it down, and they prevent the mid-morning crash that I would get otherwise. If I have a bit more time to wake up before breakfast (like an hour), then I like yogurt+granola+banana, sometimes with a bit of peanut butter if I really need nutrition (like before a race).

    That being said, I've found that biking is much easier on the stomach than running, and as long as I'm not doing hard intervals or something, I can pretty much eat whatever and feel fine.

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