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Training & Nutrition Learn how to develop a training schedule that's good for you. What should you eat and drink on your ride? Learn everything you need to know about training and nutrition here.

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Old 11-11-12, 06:35 AM   #1
lennyk
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LA/Carmichael high cadence now a myth ?

Not too long ago high cadence was touted as the way to increase power and efficiency,
we now know those indidviduals were EPO assisted.

ANybody been able to stay with lower cadence and still have decent power ?
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Old 11-11-12, 08:01 AM   #2
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"LA/Carmichael high cadence now a myth ?"

No, but Carmichael always was. - Terry
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Old 11-11-12, 09:50 AM   #3
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High cadence spares glycogen. If you have the VO2max to ride that way, you can train to increase your cadence and see gains in your speed/endurance. If not, not.
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Old 11-11-12, 09:55 AM   #4
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There is no magic.

High cadence doesn't mean you will go faster than someone that is efficient with a lower cadence.
fwiw, most people are most efficient at about 90rpms in steady riding.

If you can spin a big gear, you will go faster. You need to do both (spin+bigger gear=speed).
That is why motorpacing is a valuable training aid.
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Old 11-11-12, 11:05 AM   #5
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...If you can spin a big gear, you will go faster. You need to do both (spin+bigger gear=speed).
That is why motorpacing is a valuable training aid.
I don't get that. Going faster by spinning a bigger gear means pushing harder than with the smaller gear all else being equal. Drafting behind a vehicle reduces the load so you're not pushing any harder than spinning a smaller gear when not drafting. Where's the benefit?
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Old 11-11-12, 12:21 PM   #6
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If you read the Tyler Hamilton or Floyd Landis books or any other accounting of Lance's successes you will notice an obvious absence of any mention of Carmichael. Was it purely a business relationship?
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Old 11-11-12, 04:02 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cruiserhead View Post
There is no magic.

High cadence doesn't mean you will go faster than someone that is efficient with a lower cadence.
fwiw, most people are most efficient at about 90rpms in steady riding.

If you can spin a big gear, you will go faster. You need to do both (spin+bigger gear=speed).
That is why motorpacing is a valuable training aid.
Motorpacing may be valuable but that isn't the reason. Regardless of what gear you spin you still need to put out the power. Motorpacing doesn't increase your power.
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Old 11-11-12, 04:05 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by lennyk View Post
Not too long ago high cadence was touted as the way to increase power and efficiency,
we now know those indidviduals were EPO assisted.

ANybody been able to stay with lower cadence and still have decent power ?
There are lots of reasons to use a higher cadence while racing.

If you're talking only about time trialling and you don't have to attack or respond to accelerations then you need to use whatever cadence gives you the most power. If you have a powermeter it's not difficult to figure out what works best.
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Old 11-11-12, 08:48 PM   #9
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I had a coach in the early 90s who had us spinning 90 on anything but hills. For climbing, he emphasized 70. That was painful to push a gear at the cadence. Then in 2001 or so, I got another coach who pushed the LA/Carmichael higher cadence. He had me spinning 90 to 100 on everything including climbs. It took awhile to get used to it but I love it now. It's second nature now and it was very helpful when I was off the bike for 2 years and got started again as I had no leg power. I did have some lungs from trail running so that helped.
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