Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Training & Nutrition Learn how to develop a training schedule that's good for you. What should you eat and drink on your ride? Learn everything you need to know about training and nutrition here.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 06-22-13, 03:35 PM   #1
CanadianBiker32
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
CanadianBiker32's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Canada
Bikes: Maxim, Rocky Mountain, Argon 18, Cervelo S2 Team
Posts: 669
Cadence Sensors for on MTB worth reading

I have one of those Cyclecomputers , Garmin 500 Edge etc.

I have the cadence sensor etc set up on my road bike.

Now would it be worth the time to put a cadence sensor on my mountain bike for when doing races and trails etc.

Considering when mountain biking the cadence level changes to much, with conditions of trails, would it be worth the time and expense to get that extra sensor?

thanks
CanadianBiker32 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-13, 04:57 PM   #2
Athens80
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Bikes:
Posts: 827
Quote:
Originally Posted by CanadianBiker32 View Post
I have one of those Cyclecomputers , Garmin 500 Edge etc.... Now would it be worth the time to put a cadence sensor on my mountain bike for when doing races and trails etc.
The speed displayed on the Edge 500 screen will be more accurate using a speed/cadence sensor; having just the GPS leaves you with gaps when the satellite signal is lost through the trees.
Athens80 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-13, 09:37 AM   #3
gregf83 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Vancouver, BC
Bikes:
Posts: 7,178
An extra cadence sensor doesn't cost a lot but it's not going to make you race any faster as you are unlikely to be looking at it during the race. I'm not sure there's much useful information to be gleaned after the race that you wouldn't get from the Garmin on its own. Having slightly more accurate speed isn't important.

I have speed/cad sensors on my road bikes but not my MTB. I don't think it's worth it and I'd be more concerned about that little arm getting mixed up in the spokes on the MTB.
gregf83 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-24-13, 04:47 PM   #4
bigfred 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: NZ
Bikes: More than 1, but, less than S-1
Posts: 3,834
I recently put one on my mtb for the reason of signal loss amongst others. Knocked the otherwise well secured magnet off my cranks in the first 00:30 minutes. Still have more accurate speed and distance info though. Distance is particularly nice if you're doing any poorly marked trails where you're looking for a particular spur at some point or performing some form of navigation. Otherwise, its mostly post ride curiousity.
__________________
Birth Certificate, Passport, Marriage License Driver's License and Residency Permit all say I'm a Fred. I guess there's no denying it.
bigfred is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-13, 10:27 AM   #5
Looigi
Senior Member
 
Looigi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Bikes:
Posts: 8,942
Cadence not so much but wheel sensor helps accuracy over tortuous routes and improves auto-pause reliability at slower speeds. You could use a GSC10 and not bother with the pedal magnet or use some other ANT+ wheel sensor.
Looigi is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:34 PM.