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Old 03-15-05, 08:10 PM   #1
hawk00eyed
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Knees Adjusting to a new bike

I just got a new bike, after riding my old one for over 2 years, 3500 miles, most of it in this past year. Does it take time to get used to the set up of the new bike? Well i have adjusted the saddle position and height to what feels, as well as looks, like what it was on the old bike, but maybe it isn't Exactly, precisely the same. I feel a little LITTle pain in the right knee when i ride on the new bike (i've only taken it out for 4 rides so far). Would you say my legs just need to get used to the new setup?
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Old 03-15-05, 08:18 PM   #2
pearcem
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give your legs a few times to get used to the ride. don't forget to get a good stretch and warm up. . . if getting used to the new bike is the source of the pain, then this might help out a little. i recently made the same move after my knees and back started to hurt me (i moved to a bigger frame), and my back and knee pain got worse for a few rides, then improved dramatically. after having the bike for a week, i was almost completely pain free, and with a few cleat adjustments and new stretches, the pain is gone. you may need to have the bike fit by your shop or even a professional fit if nothing else works, but give your body some time to adjust before changing things on the bike. good luck
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Old 03-15-05, 08:22 PM   #3
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Get clipless pedals with lots of float, like Time ATAC, a mtb pedal also used by road bike and fixie riders. You will thank me. Position your saddle high and forward. Avoid hard gear ratios.
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Old 03-16-05, 03:45 PM   #4
pearcem
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when i went to a lot of float, it was actually too much and hurt my knees worse. i limited the float, and that problem went away. Just saying that lots of float is not always going to help, but in most cases, it will.
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Old 03-28-05, 01:24 PM   #5
DC_Emily
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I have two bikes that I rotate between. Last week, I switched again, which I haven't done in a few months. I've been having alot of muscle soreness directly above my knees for the past few days. I think it's because of the difference in the cranksets. I've gone from a 175mm crankarm to a 170mm. Is this the reason for the soreness? There isn't any other major difference between the bikes.
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