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Training & Nutrition Learn how to develop a training schedule that's good for you. What should you eat and drink on your ride? Learn everything you need to know about training and nutrition here.

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Old 04-14-14, 10:59 AM   #1
Weatherby
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Fluid intake on long rides?

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.............Repeat the experiment at different temperatures. If you can't do this, then use Lon Haldeman's 75% for 10 degrees F rule as a guide: Haldeman needs 60 oz/hour at 100F, roughly 75% of that, or 45 oz/hour at 90F, and 32 oz/hour at 80F. At 70F and below, he needs about 15 oz/hr[8].

The bloating paradox section is worth its weight in gold. Too much fluids and not enough sodium......worth reading the first link for anyone who gets nausea, confusion, puffiness, and/or headaches on long rides.


https://ultracycling.com/sections/ar...onatremia2.php

Ultracycling: Low blood sodium (hyponatremia)

SSE #88: Hyponatremia in Athletes
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Old 04-14-14, 11:48 AM   #2
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Lon may not be human. The standard max fluid intake is about 1 liter/hour. Very few individuals can move it across the stomach wall faster. See:
http://hprc-online.org/nutrition/hpr...id-replacement
New military guidelines are 1 qt./hr regardless of heat or work.

That said, I once emptied a 70 oz. Camelbak in about 1.5 hours on a pass climb after a rest from heat exhaustion. I use Endurolytes. They contain adequate sodium.

If you are riding in the heat, 1 qt./hr will not be enough. Solution: rest in the shade while drinking until your HR comes down to normal. Note the military hourly work/rest schedule of 10/50 for hard work in extreme heat. You have to figure your own by experience. A HRM is invaluable for monitoring dehydration during hot rides.
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Old 04-15-14, 07:45 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
Lon may not be human. The standard max fluid intake is about 1 liter/hour. Very few individuals can move it across the stomach wall faster.
I don't think it's all that unusual. When it's over 85 F and humid I can easily down 2 quarts an hour (no bloating) and still get dehydrated.
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Old 04-15-14, 09:56 PM   #4
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I don't think it's all that unusual. When it's over 85 F and humid I can easily down 2 quarts an hour (no bloating) and still get dehydrated.
Then you're a better man than I am. I've never been able to average more than about a liter an hour on the bike, hour after hour. Thus the most I've ever carried, even in over 100, is 3 liters, enough to get me 50 miles between controls. I've never seen a local randonneur carrying more than that. Most don't carry more than 2 liters.
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