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Thread: how to find LT

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    how to find LT

    hey everyone, i dont know if you can find your LT without going to a expencive medical place, but i have heard rumors that you can. can someone clear this up for me? i would really like to find out what mine is without paying a ton of cash thanks

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    Meow! my58vw's Avatar
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    Yes you can and it is easy...

    This is how I found mine...

    30 minute itt inside on a trainer (individual time trial). Since you can not go anarobic for very long the average of your HR for the last 20 minutes of the 30 minute ride is your LT with a small correction. The average of several of these itt's will be a good estimate of LT. For example I did 4 itts on 4 consecutive weeks on the trainer. The HRs were 167, 166, 164 and 166, averaging to 166 BPM. Once you know that value you can design workouts that are more zoned for your HR.
    Just your average club rider... :)

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    ok, i think im getting this. im still a little confused what it means to hit your LT, but dont you want to stay a little lower than it ideally? thanks a ton

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    Meow! my58vw's Avatar
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    You Lactic Acid Threshold (LT) is the point where you just start breathing hard and just start feeling burning from lactic acid buildup. It may take some time to get used to where it is but you can feel it start. You will not feel a lot of burning or alot of heavy breathing, just the start. Basically for me it is the point where I feel if I breath normal I will have to gasp for a breath every 5 seconds of so. If there is excessive burning or heavy heavy breathing then you are above you LT and going anaerobic.

    Depending on the riding you do will depend on where you ride in HR zones. For racing anything under LT is ideal but it is easy to surpass. LT is more important in training because LT inervals are used to raise your LT but increasing the bodies ability to buffer lactic acid. (LT intervals are long intervals just below your LT). In a race or a group ride the group determines where you ride.

    The itt works because you naturally ride about your LT in a TT. You can only stand a anaerobic effort for a few minutes. If you are going hard then your avaerage will be right there...
    Just your average club rider... :)

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    On Your Right ZackJones's Avatar
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    I think a slightly more accurate description is Anaerobic Threshold (AT). This is the point where your body can not work aerobically and lactic acid builds in the muscles faster than the body can purge it.

    I was recently tested ($100) and will give you some idea how the process works. Before you complete your test you need to be well rested. I did an easy swim the day before mine. You eat no more than 3 hours before the test and you should be well hydrated before you begin.

    My bike was put on a computrainer and then I was fitted with a two valve mask. One valve allowed fresh air to come in and the other allowed air to escape which was read by the machine I was hooked up to. You put the mask on and breath normally for a minute or so. This allows the machine to calibrate itself and establishes you starting heart rate, etc. When the test starts you pedal the bike and periodically resistance is added. If your tester is nice he or she will tell you when you've reached your AT. From that point on you can either stop the test or continue. I made it about 2 minutes beyond the point where my AT was determined. At this point you start your cool down, etc. Once everything is said and done I left with 5 or 6 pieces of paper, some cool graphs, etc and most important a set of HR zones to train based upon my AT.

    IMO, getting this type of test is 2nd only in importance to a professional fitting on your bike. I'm trying to get back up to Atlanta to get tested for running but I'm having a hard time that works for the coach and me. If you look around enough you should be able to find a place where you can get tested without it costing you a fortune.
    "You never fail, you simply produce results. Learn from these" - Anonymous

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    Name's Ash ...housewares Doctor Morbius's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by redlemondrsx
    hey everyone, i dont know if you can find your LT without going to a expencive medical place, but i have heard rumors that you can. can someone clear this up for me? i would really like to find out what mine is without paying a ton of cash thanks
    Lactate Threshold is defined as the workrate that elicits a 1mmol/L increase over exercise baseline levels. This would be sustainable for ~ 3hrs. The ONLY way to find out your true LT is to have it tested in a lab as it requires a blood sampling.

    Heart rate measurements are not an accurate measurement of lactate threshold as HR can vary.
    I did not achieve this position in life by having some snot-nosed punk leave my cheese out in the wind. - Ed Rooney


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    Meow! my58vw's Avatar
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    Both of these are true, the home method is just an estimate.
    Just your average club rider... :)

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    Name's Ash ...housewares Doctor Morbius's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by my58vw
    Both of these are true, the home method is just an estimate.
    True. I should have said that.

    I also define Tempo as just below this effort level or around 82ish% of maximum heart rate if that's the metric one is using. A Tempo effort also being one that can be sustained for 2 to 3 hours.

    Time Trials of up to 1 hour can be performed above LT. Very hard work indeed.
    I did not achieve this position in life by having some snot-nosed punk leave my cheese out in the wind. - Ed Rooney


    It's not that I'm lazy. I'm just highly motivated to RELAX!!

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    Up until fairly recently, the concensus seemed to be that AT HR was approximately the same as LT HR. Given that tests at home on trainers are an approximation, how different are they?

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    Name's Ash ...housewares Doctor Morbius's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by roadbuzz
    Up until fairly recently, the concensus seemed to be that AT HR was approximately the same as LT HR. Given that tests at home on trainers are an approximation, how different are they?
    The coaches I've corresponded with (Richard Stern, Michael Smartt, Andy Coggan) state that Anerobic Threshold is an obsolete term. They use Lactate Threshold.
    I did not achieve this position in life by having some snot-nosed punk leave my cheese out in the wind. - Ed Rooney


    It's not that I'm lazy. I'm just highly motivated to RELAX!!

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