Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 20 of 20

Thread: high heart rate

  1. #1
    DTM
    DTM is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    85
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    high heart rate

    normal for people of similar fitness and age groups have totally differing heart rate levels when excercising (particularly cycling).
    I am 32, 67 kgs (147lbs) and have an estimated max of 195. When finishing my ride or CV exercise my average heart rate is considerably higher than all of my fellow riders. I would expect that to be the case with riders much older with lower maximum HRís, but I find it the case with riders of a similar age and perceived fitness.
    Regardless of my perceived fitness levels my Ave HR is nearly always 160-165 over a 2-3 hr ride, whereas my fellow riders of a similar age would seem to be 140-145 at the same intensity of effort. Maintaining 170-180 for a long time is very normal for me and causes me no pain or problems, 150-160 feels like no effort at all.
    I only have start most gradients and I am at 180 in an instant. But I am still one of the best hill climbers in my club !
    I tried keeping it down recently on a steady, level solo ride, I really took it easy and didnít suffer all. But as before the ave HR was 165 !

    Is it possible to have this much variance at the same perceived effort levels or is it : -

    a. That I am putting more effort in than others and am suffering more than, I think they are.
    b. I am not as fit as they are, and I am kidding myself. And pushing too hard.

    Thanks in advance for advice

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Denver
    My Bikes
    Cervelo R3
    Posts
    205
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you are truly worried...you might want to get it checked out by a doctor. It might be a heart condition of sorts. The only reason I mention this is because my brother is the same way. Not sure there is anything he can do about it...and it was only detected when I put a heart monitor on him and we went for a run. His heart rate went up and down when we harder and easier but peaked over 200 I believe...and we weren't going that hard.

  3. #3
    DTM
    DTM is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    85
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by borg
    If you are truly worried...you might want to get it checked out by a doctor. It might be a heart condition of sorts. The only reason I mention this is because my brother is the same way. Not sure there is anything he can do about it...and it was only detected when I put a heart monitor on him and we went for a run. His heart rate went up and down when we harder and easier but peaked over 200 I believe...and we weren't going that hard.
    Yes that does seems similar to mine, but without the extremes of your brother. How does your brother suffer when running with a high rate. My main confusion is that I dont seem to suffer that badly at higher heart rates.

  4. #4
    Roadie/Duathlete
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    NH
    My Bikes
    Colnago ExP, Look 595, Look 496, plus a few more...
    Posts
    431
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Some people naturally has a higher heartrate... 150-160 with spike of 180 during hard intensity does seem to that bad... Does play around with the heart though... Go and see a doctor to make sure there is nothing outside of a naturally occuring high heartrate.
    "Suddenly the thought struck me. My floor is someone elses ceiling"-Nils Ferlin

  5. #5
    Senior Member roadwarrior's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Galt Gulch
    My Bikes
    Cannondale Super Six High Mod, Evo, Sram Red, CAAD9 Rival
    Posts
    10,048
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    First, I am not a doctor. I did study exercise physiology in college, but it was neanderthal compared to what they do now...but one thing I learned is that this "one size fits all" approach to estimated HR max's and the like can be disturbing to people who do not fit the mold. One other thing I learned is that, while racing bikes at a decently high (cat II) level is that HR's were all over the place and in those days we took them off our wrists...with polars and the like today, it's a lot more scientific...

    With that being said, every single exercise program in existence says get checked by a doctor...do not misunderstand this as being a problem, it could just be your unique makeup. But find out. At least make an appointment with your doctor to tell him what you told the cyberworld and its experts...

    One more point...you mentioned your "estimated max HR"...to find out what it is, do a max HR test either on your bike (two three mile time trials with a 10 minute rest between each three mile effort) or a stress test in a hospital...AFTER MEETING WITH YOUR DOCTOR...

    Unless someone's a cardiologist on this board and is willing to give up free advice, talk to your doctor, if for no other reason than piece of mind...

    FYI...I am 50 and while the "chart" says my max HR is to be 170 or so, mine is about 161 and I can ride for hours at 20-25mph at about 128-130. I go into lactate at about 157-158 and I can ride hard (above 25mph) at about 149-150. Resting for me is 60bpm.

  6. #6
    DTM
    DTM is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    85
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    All good advice. I am not abnormally concerned to be honest as I am totally comfortable at 170, and have no issues other than that of progression of my race fitness. My resting is about 47-49 bpm and I only seem to go anaerobic and cannot sustain at approx 180. It is quite possible that my own calculated max is too low. As others have suggested that if it is 195 max then I should be anaerobic at my comfortable level, which cannot be the case as I can sustain at 170-175 as long as I wish within reason

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    chicago
    Posts
    44
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Now you guys have me worried. I am 24 and just started using a HRM to train a few months ago. I found my max HR was 212 BPM, and it seems consistent with my training over the last few months. My LT zone is around 180-190 BPM. I thought that some people just naturally had a higer max, am I wrong?

  8. #8
    DTM
    DTM is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    85
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by matgarf
    Now you guys have me worried. I am 24 and just started using a HRM to train a few months ago. I found my max HR was 212 BPM, and it seems consistent with my training over the last few months. My LT zone is around 180-190 BPM. I thought that some people just naturally had a higer max, am I wrong?
    Did you see 212 ? Or have you calculated that yourself ? I dont think any one would disagree that everyone has a different max regardless of the very vague 220 - age formula. I have no problem with my max being high at all. My problem is that my average is high whilst remaining very comfortable

  9. #9
    dfw
    dfw is offline
    Stercus accidit dfw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Dallas/Fort Worth
    My Bikes
    Trek Pilot 2.1
    Posts
    686
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The 220-age formula for max HR is nothing more than a guide. If you can sustain 90% of your theoretical max for long periods, your actual max HR is undoubtedly higher than the 220-age formula would suggest. Although max HR can improve with training, max HR is not a good indicator of fitness level. VO2 max is a much better indicator of fitness level, but even at that you have to compare it with people who are in the same sport. If you have a Polar HR monitor, the chest strap is compatible with most of the excersize bikes you'll find at a good gym. You can run a fitness test on them which will give you an estimation of your VO2 max. The test is similar to a stress test that cardiologists run on treadmills. I have a VO2 max of 52, which is pretty good for my age, but if I were just to guess, Lance Armstrong probably has a VO2 max around 75 or higher.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Paso Robles Ca.
    Posts
    382
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have voiced this same concern. My friends kinda chuckle when they get my reading on their monitors. I think that some of my issue is that I may not be the most efficient rider...a limb length difference leaves me always feeling like one of my legs is more dominant. In my more fit years I could ride for long periods...over 1 hour...spending most of the time above 175. I climbed some major climbs last year and spent 1-3 hours in the 180s. From what I've heard...Hincapie has a very high HR...max of around 220-225 and spends a lot of time in the low 200's during max efforts. I am taking the approach that part of it is my lack of efficiency but more to do with the fact that I just run a high rate.

    I do find that I need to watch my efforts to allow better recovery. I need to make my hard days harder and easy days easier. I spend too much time riding in the 160-170's on a regular basis. I think that 1-2 harder days combined with staying below 155 on the easier days will help me improve quicker and enjoy it more. I think this is a common issue for many others...good luck
    The doer and the thinker, no allowance for the other
    As the failing light illuminates the mercenaries creed

  11. #11
    Climbing Fool terrymorse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Palo Alto, CA
    My Bikes
    Scott Addict R1, Felt Z1
    Posts
    3,019
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by dfw
    I have a VO2 max of 52, which is pretty good for my age, but if I were just to guess, Lance Armstrong probably has a VO2 max around 75 or higher.
    Armstrong's web site says his VO2max is 84, but that same number has been posted there for years. The folks on the Wattage forum* think this is too low. Based on his uphill time trial performance, they estimate his VO2max at 92-94. That's insanely high.

    (*)The wattage forum is frequented by physiologists and other brainy types.
    Managing Director, Undiscovered Country Tours

  12. #12
    Litespeed Classic Allerge99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Fort Worth, Tx
    Posts
    45
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I am 23, and yesterday I had a average HR of 183 for about a hour and a half of riding averaging 19.6 mph with a 25+ knot wind all afternoon. I was alone most of the time. I have seen my HR hit 215 before on my Polar HRM. I believe the 220-age=HR is a good standard for most people that aren't athletic. I teach spinning classes on my spare time or when it is raining outside and that is what we tell people when trying to determine their HR while in class. Most of the people in there only workout 2 or so times a week, so it is a good standard for them. For active athletes that use a HRM all of the time, knowing your own ranges will help you tremendously when trying to gauge your efforts.

  13. #13
    dfw
    dfw is offline
    Stercus accidit dfw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Dallas/Fort Worth
    My Bikes
    Trek Pilot 2.1
    Posts
    686
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by terrymorse
    Armstrong's web site says his VO2max is 84, but that same number has been posted there for years. The folks on the Wattage forum* think this is too low. Based on his uphill time trial performance, they estimate his VO2max at 92-94. That's insanely high.

    (*)The wattage forum is frequented by physiologists and other brainy types.
    The highest recorded VO2 max scores are in the mid 90s. It wouldn't suprise me if Lance's numbers approach that, but you don't necessarily have to have an insanely high score to win like he does. Insane effort can make up for some of it.

  14. #14
    dfw
    dfw is offline
    Stercus accidit dfw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Dallas/Fort Worth
    My Bikes
    Trek Pilot 2.1
    Posts
    686
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Allerge99
    I am 23, and yesterday I had a average HR of 183 for about a hour and a half of riding averaging 19.6 mph with a 25+ knot wind all afternoon. I was alone most of the time. I have seen my HR hit 215 before on my Polar HRM. I believe the 220-age=HR is a good standard for most people that aren't athletic. I teach spinning classes on my spare time or when it is raining outside and that is what we tell people when trying to determine their HR while in class. Most of the people in there only workout 2 or so times a week, so it is a good standard for them. For active athletes that use a HRM all of the time, knowing your own ranges will help you tremendously when trying to gauge your efforts.
    Max HR has some to do with being athletic, but that's not all there is to it. There are also genetics involved in determining what the actual is. It's sort of like saying the average height of a male is 5'10". Some are shorter, some are taller. The formula is just to give you a starting point for the average. Actual testing or experience tells you the real zones you should train by.

  15. #15
    Senior Member doctorSpoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    523
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    from what i've read maxHR is pretty much set by your genetics, somewhat dependant on size (smaller people will have slightly higher maxHR) and age. has nothing to do with anything... i.e. fitness, potential etc.. it's just YOUR maxHR... your resting heart rate is a good indication of how good a shape you are in... if you have a very efficient cardiovascular system you can maintian yourself with your heart beating less.

    your VO2max occurs at about 95-98% of maxHR (VO2max is pretty much set by genetics as well, but you can make small gains with training)... tells you your potential... how much oxygen your body can use over a given time = your potential to do work over a given time.

    the closer you can get your LT (lactic acid threshold) to your maxHR the better off you are going to be... what you realy want to do is compare your LT as a percentage of you maxHR to your friend's, the larger that number the better (LT/maxHRx100)... but it's not that simple.. if you and your freind and you both have LT that are 90% of the maxHR but he has a VO2max of 70 and you have a VO2max of 60 then he will be able to do more work than you. LT can be changed quite a bit with training (takes years though), so if you get your percentage LT to maxHR of 95% (training more than him) you may be able to beat him up the hill even with his higher VO2max... some people have a greater ablitity than others to move their LT than others too. so VO2max isn't everything..

    i still say every year it is good to see a doctor, but i don't think you have anything to worry about

    i'm 5'7", 135lbs and my maxHR is 200 and my LT is about 183-185. above LT that and the pain asscoicated with lactic acid goes up exponetially the faster you go... the most important number you can know is your LT... VO2max can tell you your potential but doesn't really tell you how good a cyclist you are.

  16. #16
    dfw
    dfw is offline
    Stercus accidit dfw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Dallas/Fort Worth
    My Bikes
    Trek Pilot 2.1
    Posts
    686
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You can make large gains in VO2 max. If you are out of shape, measure your VO2 max, then get in very good shape, there will be a dramatic increase in your VO2 max score. The maximum possible VO2 max does vary based on genetics. An average person might train extremely intensely for many years and only get their VO2 max to 65, where someone like Lance Armstrong can get his to 85 or higher.

    VO2 max is not just an indicator of potential, it's a good indicator of fitness level. It has nothing to do with skill or desire, so it won't tell you how good of a cyclist you are, but you can use it to gauge improvements in your fitness.

  17. #17
    Allez!!! Allez!!! martin_j001's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    My Bikes
    Gunnar Roadie w/Dura Ace, Benotto w/105
    Posts
    834
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've always had a high maxHR too, much higher than those I ride with. I'm 26 and a bit overweight at the time. When I haven't been exercising routinely (as in I'm only riding weekends), I find that my avgs can be around 170-180. Even then, after my hr peaks at around 200bpm on a hill, it comes down to the 130's or 140's in the next five minutes on the flats. Even when I'm riding every day, my avg's usually only go into the 160's for a decent paced ride, maybe 150's for the real slow ride. I can still push the hr over 200 in a sprint or on a hill anytime I want though. I'm not a doctor (only a biologist), but I'd venture to say that as long as there is nothing wrong with your heart, you aren't doing a whole lot of damage to it by working it hard once in a while. At least I hope thats true....

  18. #18
    Senior Member doctorSpoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    523
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by dfw
    You can make large gains in VO2 max. If you are out of shape, measure your VO2 max, then get in very good shape, there will be a dramatic increase in your VO2 max score. The maximum possible VO2 max does vary based on genetics. An average person might train extremely intensely for many years and only get their VO2 max to 65, where someone like Lance Armstrong can get his to 85 or higher.

    VO2 max is not just an indicator of potential, it's a good indicator of fitness level. It has nothing to do with skill or desire, so it won't tell you how good of a cyclist you are, but you can use it to gauge improvements in your fitness.
    you are right that VO2max does rise with training, but the adaptation occurs very quickly... measured in the span of weeks. within 6-8 weeks of training you VO2max will plateau based on your genitics. couch potatos can move their VO2max alot, but if you are already in very good condition your VO2max won't move very much at all. adaptation in LT occurs over years and continual improvement is possible, and is not bound by geneitic.

    but yeah... if you take a month or two off you will have to build your V02max up again to it's geneticaly bounded limit.
    Last edited by doctorSpoc; 03-30-05 at 01:07 PM.

  19. #19
    dfw
    dfw is offline
    Stercus accidit dfw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Dallas/Fort Worth
    My Bikes
    Trek Pilot 2.1
    Posts
    686
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    VO2 max is just like most anything else fitness related, such as weight training as an example. When you first start, you can make huge gains relatively easily, however later on it will take large amounts of effort to make small gains. That's why many athletes take the steroid route when they reach their personal plateau.

  20. #20
    Senior Member doctorSpoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    523
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by dfw
    VO2 max is just like most anything else fitness related, such as weight training as an example. When you first start, you can make huge gains relatively easily, however later on it will take large amounts of effort to make small gains. That's why many athletes take the steroid route when they reach their personal plateau.
    or even more directly in the case of VO2max; EPO, blood doping etc.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •