Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 25 of 25
  1. #1
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    I ride where the thylacine roamed!
    My Bikes
    Lots
    Posts
    39,926
    Mentioned
    42 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Asthma and Hills

    Do you suffer from asthma (including EIA)? Do you live in a hilly area?

    If so, how do you handle the hills? What are some tricks you've developed when you're faced with climbing a hill shortly after starting your ride?

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    538
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I used to use my inhaler 15-30 minutes before riding to avoid having EIA however since changing my diet a bit it's been a non-issue.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Pleasanton,CA
    My Bikes
    2 Road 1 MTB
    Posts
    563
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have no issue until I stop riding... usually 30-40m after then my breathing get funky. I'll use an inhaler when I get home and generally that stops it.

  4. #4
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    I ride where the thylacine roamed!
    My Bikes
    Lots
    Posts
    39,926
    Mentioned
    42 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by spdntrxi View Post
    I have no issue until I stop riding... usually 30-40m after then my breathing get funky. I'll use an inhaler when I get home and generally that stops it.
    That's how I was when my asthma first started ... for probably the first 5-ish years with it. Then it got worse.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Pleasanton,CA
    My Bikes
    2 Road 1 MTB
    Posts
    563
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Machka View Post
    That's how I was when my asthma first started ... for probably the first 5-ish years with it. Then it got worse.
    shoot really... that sucks.... I hope that not what I have to look forward too.

  6. #6
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    I ride where the thylacine roamed!
    My Bikes
    Lots
    Posts
    39,926
    Mentioned
    42 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have heard some tricks like ...

    -- making sure you get a good warm-up before tackling the hills. Tough to do where I live, and I may need to think about setting up the trainer in the garage and riding for 10-15 minutes before setting off.

    -- exhaling forceably ... really focusing on the exhale ... while climbing.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    New Rochelle, NY
    My Bikes
    too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter
    Posts
    22,556
    Mentioned
    69 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Machka View Post
    I have heard some tricks like ...

    -- making sure you get a good warm-up before tackling the hills. Tough to do where I live, and I may need to think about setting up the trainer in the garage and riding for 10-15 minutes before setting off.

    -- exhaling forceably ... really focusing on the exhale ... while climbing.
    I have almost 50 years with asthma, and have been fairly successful managing it on rides. For whatever reason, if I have an attack and recovery early in the ride I'm rock solid for the rest of the day. It also helps to warm up slowly, but that's tough because I live on the side of a hill and most of my rides start going up.

    I've also learned to feel an onset before it comes on full bore especially on climbs or chilly damp mornings, and can often ride the edge by backing off a bit. Like with an attack/recovery if I make it an hour in, I'm safe for the day.

    Since I suffer both from exercise induced asthma (maybe from training as a runner and riding the bike to school on very cold winter days) and some allergy asthma certain seasons are tough. Mouth breathing pollen filled air is a bad mix, so I try to avoid it, though it's hard to move enough air through the nose, and nose breathing high volume of sub freezing air is a guarantied headache.

    The best advice, is to learn your own triggers and rhythms, and try to make minor concessions to them. IME- with attentive to your own cues, you can be mostly asthma free unless you have a more serious case.

    BTW- I doubt this is a problem in Tasmania, but I've found that I do better in cold weather if I underdress than overdress. Somehow staying cool is better than breathing cold air into a hot body (who knows why).
    FB
    Chain-L site

    An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

    “Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

    “One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

    WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.

  8. #8
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    I ride where the thylacine roamed!
    My Bikes
    Lots
    Posts
    39,926
    Mentioned
    42 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
    It also helps to warm up slowly, but that's tough because I live on the side of a hill and most of my rides start going up.

    ...

    BTW- I doubt this is a problem in Tasmania, but I've found that I do better in cold weather if I underdress than overdress. Somehow staying cool is better than breathing cold air into a hot body (who knows why).

    We have just moved and also live on the side of a hill. We can either do a shortish steep climb immediately out of the driveway and then a bit of up-and down after that ... or a quick descent followed by more climbing. That's why I'm toying with the idea of warming up on a trainer for a little while first so that the sudden climbs don't affect me so badly.

    And Tasmania's climate is very similar to the Pacific Northwest in North America. It's spring right now and we're cycling in temps that range between about 12°C and 22°C.

    However, I have noticed that I have even more trouble breathing when I'm going through a hot flash while climbing. If I know I've got some climbing coming up, I prefer to shed all jackets, vests, etc. before I get there.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Bristol, R. I.
    My Bikes
    Specialized Secteur, old Peugeot
    Posts
    1,599
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have had in the past asthma attacks, (twice) induced by exercise. These days Symibcort wards against that problem effectively. I also have an Albuterol rescue inhaler but never need it while using Symbicort. As a life long smoker, I suffer from reduced lung function with the result being limited O2 availability during hard efforts. For example, maintaining high speed for a length of time or climbing beyond moderate speed/effort is not possible.

    My solution for harder efforts is to improve breathing efficiency through technique. Part of technique is strengthening the breathing muscles which are also the oft mentioned core muscles - the oblique muscles crisscrossing the chest and abdomen. The best explanation I've seen of how this works is in a book on yoga anatomy. Yoga Anatomy - 2nd Edition | Power Systems I would guess there is a good bit of free info on the web. For a quick explanation though, the chest and abdominal cavities are bellows. An increase in the volume of the chest cavity, which contains the lungs, results in a reduced volume of the abdominal cavity. The principal muscle regulating this volume is the diaphragm, hence the emphasis and focus on it by musicians playing wind instruments, singers and high altitude mountaineers. While the diaphragm does the bulk of the work for breathing, oblique muscles help expand the chest cavity on inhaling, then push out old air on exhaling. The obliques, located both outside the rib cage as well as inside to cause opening and then closing the bellows of the chest. This process, by the way, is why breathing on a very full stomach after a big meal, is difficult; available volume for chest expansion is reduced.

    There is a moderate hill near my home, up to 8% grade and up to 1/3 mile long, which I ride nearly every day. This year I'm a bit faster on this hill. I'm winded at the top but not gasping like a fish out of water. Surprisingly, at the middle section where the slope moderates a bit to maybe 7%, I can actually recover somewhat but I'm paying close attention to breathing technique. And this time of year, as temps get cold, It certainly gets my old bod up to operating temperature quickly.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Boulder, CO
    Posts
    7,500
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have had EIA for a couple of years now. I think the warmup is a great idea, if the hill is so steep that it puts you into distress. Also, use the albuterol before starting your ride. make sure you are using it right - really deep exhale before taking it, and inhale and hold it all the way in your lungs.

    Are you working with a pulmonologist, and on a daily steroid? I only take Advair during allergy season, or when I am sick, but taking it for a while or all the time might help. You should work with a doctor to help get it under control.
    ...

  11. #11
    just another gosling Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Everett, WA
    My Bikes
    CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004
    Posts
    8,593
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    I have relatively mild asthma but it gets worse when I climb, so it also has an EIA aspect. I used to just use albuterol when it got bad, but then I realized that actually I had it a little bit all the time on the bike. Now I use a Flovent Diskus (fluticazone propionate) 250 mg once a day and a Serevent Diskus (salmeterol zinafoate) 50 mg before an event or very hard ride. I very seldom need to use the albuterol.

    My wife is about the same, but she has much worse asthma than I, so she uses an Advair 250/50 twice a day. Additionally, she uses her albuterol about 1/2 hour before we ride and may need it again during long hard climbs. I usually hear her breathing rate increase and have to advise her to use the albuterol. She doesn't seem to notice the problem on her own, I guess just thinking she is going that hard, but she isn't going as hard as it feels to her that she is, and I can tell that because she's on the back of my tandem.

    Our pulmonary doc is very firm about never allowing asthma to occur. He says that having asthma symptoms is a precursor to eventually having COPD. He is firmly in the camp that taking inhaled steroids is vastly preferable to acquiring COPD.

    You can get a flow meter cheaply, use it every morning, and graph the results. You should be able to see how your flow varies over time, and spot trouble coming.

  12. #12
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    I ride where the thylacine roamed!
    My Bikes
    Lots
    Posts
    39,926
    Mentioned
    42 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by valygrl View Post
    I have had EIA for a couple of years now. I think the warmup is a great idea, if the hill is so steep that it puts you into distress. Also, use the albuterol before starting your ride. make sure you are using it right - really deep exhale before taking it, and inhale and hold it all the way in your lungs.

    Are you working with a pulmonologist, and on a daily steroid? I only take Advair during allergy season, or when I am sick, but taking it for a while or all the time might help. You should work with a doctor to help get it under control.
    I'm using the inhaler the way my Drs and allergist have shown me ... like how you described. But I think I do need to use it earlier ... I tend to use it seconds before I start the ride because it is in my handlebar bag. And then I gasp and wheeze (like a fish out of water) immediately upon starting the ride. But half an hour later I'm fine.

    I used it earlier today, and that seemed better.


    Also, back in January, my Dr put me on steroids (steroid inhaler) for about 2-3 weeks. First I developed a sore mouth and throat, then my voice went hoarse, then I developed a mouthful of sores, then I lost much of my voice ... and then the nose bleeds started. I also felt really unwell the whole time and at no point could I breathe better. That's the second time I've been on a steriod inhaler ... a Dr about 5 years ago put me on one for a few weeks, and the same thing happened. In both cases, we tried different inhaling techniques, mouthwashes, etc. but nothing seemed to help. When the nose bleeds started this time, the Dr told me to stop using it immediately.


    And regarding the pulmonologist ... I've been working with GPs who have sent me for all sorts of tests.

    I've seen a cardiologist and have been for numerous heart tests and an angiogram. They thought the chest tightness, the pain, the difficulty breathing, the numbness in the left arm and jaw etc. might be heart related. The result ... my arteries are as clear as can be, but I still have the same valve issues as usual which may or may not contribute to all that.

    Next up was an endoscopy because they thought perhaps it was a hiatal hernia affecting the vagus nerve ... nope. Just evidence of gastric reflux and general inflammation ... so I'm on Nexium and sometimes additional acid reflux medication.

    Finally I talked my Dr into putting me on an ENT waiting list.

    But meanwhile, I developed bronchitis and my Dr put me on penicillin ... my bronchitis got worse. I went to a walk-in clinic and the Dr there renewed my prescription of penicillin ... I broke out into a rash and had difficulty breathing (in addition to the bronchitis). I returned to the Dr and he changed my prescription to something related to penicillin. My rash got worse and I went into an asthma attack. I returned to the Dr who immediately changed my prescription to something completely unrelated to penicillin and got me onto a pair of inhalers I used several times a day. It was a month before I could breathe again without wheezing.

    But after that I was finally able to convince my Dr to send me for allergy testing. The result of that is that I'm significantly allergic to dust mites and we're going to start desensitisation. But I had a lung function there (a second one ... I had another with my GP) and both of those tests reveal that my lung function is lower than expected for my age, weight, the fact that I don't smoke, etc. ... but still just barely within the normal range.

    So ... at this point ... my GP, cardiologist, and allergist all agree that I have asthma. But none of them seem all that interested in pursuing it beyond that. The steroid inhaler didn't work ... the other inhalers I have seem to offer some relief ... my allergy meds seem to offer some relief ... so that's that.


    But I feel like I should be able to breathe better than I do ... I'd like to be able to top hills without puffing and wheezing ... and I'd love for the chest tightness and pain on exertion to go away.

    And I do need to find a new Dr ... we've moved and I need one that is more convenient. I also need one who isn't an 11-month student placement like my last 2 Drs.

  13. #13
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    I ride where the thylacine roamed!
    My Bikes
    Lots
    Posts
    39,926
    Mentioned
    42 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
    You can get a flow meter cheaply, use it every morning, and graph the results. You should be able to see how your flow varies over time, and spot trouble coming.
    I may have to look into this.

  14. #14
    Senior Member cellery's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Tempe, AZ
    My Bikes
    Trek 2.1, 79 Univega Sportour
    Posts
    415
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    EIA only really affects me on cold days. With a good 15 min warmup in zone 2 before climbing it's not too much of an issue. I've noticed that by shifting to a slightly harder gear than I would normally choose - lowering cadence and breathing allows me to get up short but steep hills with similar exertion as spinning. Less impact on the lungs thanks to the slower, steadier breathing that lower cadence can provide for a short period of time. I'm talking 15%+ grade climbs of only a few minutes - the ones that really tax you to your limit.
    I like food.

  15. #15
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    I ride where the thylacine roamed!
    My Bikes
    Lots
    Posts
    39,926
    Mentioned
    42 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Machka View Post
    So ... at this point ... my GP, cardiologist, and allergist all agree that I have asthma. But none of them seem all that interested in pursuing it beyond that. The steroid inhaler didn't work ... the other inhalers I have seem to offer some relief ... my allergy meds seem to offer some relief ... so that's that.
    My allergist and I had a good talk today about my most recent lung function test, and she is not happy with how poor it is. So we're trying a different steroid inhaler. She wants me on it every day for the next two weeks, and will run the lung function test again then to see how I'm doing. Fingers crossed this one is better than the other one.


    As for other tips, one thing that seemed to help a bit was to raise my handlebars. I now ride quite upright and feel like I can get more air in that way.

  16. #16
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    I ride where the thylacine roamed!
    My Bikes
    Lots
    Posts
    39,926
    Mentioned
    42 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Machka View Post
    My allergist and I had a good talk today about my most recent lung function test, and she is not happy with how poor it is. So we're trying a different steroid inhaler. She wants me on it every day for the next two weeks, and will run the lung function test again then to see how I'm doing. Fingers crossed this one is better than the other one.


    As for other tips, one thing that seemed to help a bit was to raise my handlebars. I now ride quite upright and feel like I can get more air in that way.

    My lung function test from a few weeks ago revealled that my resting lung function was about 86% of the expected rate ... and decreased to about 78% with minor exercise. They didn't test with more energetic exercise.

    New steroid inhaler did NOT work. Back to Serevent.

    We did a flow meter test this morning and she said it was just barely OK, and really nowhere near as good as it should be. I will check around to see if I can find a flow meter to start monitoring things. My asthma attacks are actually getting quite noticably worse.

  17. #17
    just another gosling Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Everett, WA
    My Bikes
    CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004
    Posts
    8,593
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Not to be a pest, but have you tried Advair? Are you using the Serevent Diskus? What dosage? What was the steroid inhaler that didn't work and what dosage? Theodur is an older med that really does a job on asthma, but it has side effects. Makes you buzzy, for one. Really works, though. It's my wife's goto med for when nothing else is working and things are spinning out of control. We have about 40 years of experience with various drugs and pulmonologists. I have a mild case, but my wife has been in the ICU with it.

  18. #18
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    I ride where the thylacine roamed!
    My Bikes
    Lots
    Posts
    39,926
    Mentioned
    42 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
    Not to be a pest, but have you tried Advair? Are you using the Serevent Diskus? What dosage? What was the steroid inhaler that didn't work and what dosage? Theodur is an older med that really does a job on asthma, but it has side effects. Makes you buzzy, for one. Really works, though. It's my wife's goto med for when nothing else is working and things are spinning out of control. We have about 40 years of experience with various drugs and pulmonologists. I have a mild case, but my wife has been in the ICU with it.
    No Advair yet ... we're going to try the Serevent for a month and then see if there has been an improvement or not. Yes, the Serevent Diskus 50 mcg/dose x once daily.

    If there is an improvement, we'll stick with Serevent, if not I'm told there are a couple other things we can try.

    I've tried two different steriod inhalers now (Symbicort (100 micrograms budesonide, 60 micrograms eformoterol fumarate dihydrate) and Flovent (I'll have to check that one when I get home)) and had the same reactions with each ... sore throat, raspy voice, thrush, difficulty breathing, increased wheezing, and with the Symbicort I had nose bleeds, with the Flovent I had bleeding gums. I went from being able to walk home from the bus, gradually uphill for a grand total of 300 metres, with mild puffing ... to wheezing and gasping for breath and feeling quite dizzy within a week of using the Flovent.


    I just bought a flow meter, and I'll give that a try to start monitoring the situation.

  19. #19
    just another gosling Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Everett, WA
    My Bikes
    CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004
    Posts
    8,593
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Machka View Post
    No Advair yet ... we're going to try the Serevent for a month and then see if there has been an improvement or not. Yes, the Serevent Diskus 50 mcg/dose x once daily.

    If there is an improvement, we'll stick with Serevent, if not I'm told there are a couple other things we can try.

    I've tried two different steriod inhalers now (Symbicort (100 micrograms budesonide, 60 micrograms eformoterol fumarate dihydrate) and Flovent (I'll have to check that one when I get home)) and had the same reactions with each ... sore throat, raspy voice, thrush, difficulty breathing, increased wheezing, and with the Symbicort I had nose bleeds, with the Flovent I had bleeding gums. I went from being able to walk home from the bus, gradually uphill for a grand total of 300 metres, with mild puffing ... to wheezing and gasping for breath and feeling quite dizzy within a week of using the Flovent.


    I just bought a flow meter, and I'll give that a try to start monitoring the situation.
    Was the Flovent a diskus or spray? Major difference. And dosage?

    Serevent is like a 12 hour version of your albuterol rescue sprayer. It's a bronchoditor, so it does approximately the same thing, but with duration. Flovent and other steroids used in asthma treatment are anti-inflammatories to try to prevent the onset of asthma and thus the need for a bronchodilator.

    However, since Serevent has a 12-hour duration, in cases of persistent asthma, as opposed to only EIA, dosage is usually twice/day. Sounds like yours is persistent. The modern idea of asthma drug therapy is for there never to be an asthma attack, because every one does permanent damage. Slight, but damage nonetheless.

    If you have not tried the Flovent in Diskus form, I recommend getting your doctor to let you give it a try. The steroid half of the treatment is really important.

  20. #20
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    I ride where the thylacine roamed!
    My Bikes
    Lots
    Posts
    39,926
    Mentioned
    42 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The Flovent is a spray ... not sure what dose yet.

    I know the steroid ones are supposed to be important, but after having two bad reactions, I'm reluctant. I did all the things you're supposed to do ... brushing teeth, etc. ... but even Rowan noticed a negative difference in my breathing when I was on it. Aside from the increased wheezing just walking around + all the other symptoms, we discovered that it caused me to snore loudly ... for him, that meant no sleep ... for me, that meant I dreamed I was drowning night after night, and frequently woke up in a panic, absolutely gasping for air.

    After about 10 nights of that, I gave it up and returned to Serevent ... and a couple nights later my snoring and drowning dreams subsided.

  21. #21
    just another gosling Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Everett, WA
    My Bikes
    CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004
    Posts
    8,593
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Machka View Post
    The Flovent is a spray ... not sure what dose yet.

    I know the steroid ones are supposed to be important, but after having two bad reactions, I'm reluctant. I did all the things you're supposed to do ... brushing teeth, etc. ... but even Rowan noticed a negative difference in my breathing when I was on it. Aside from the increased wheezing just walking around + all the other symptoms, we discovered that it caused me to snore loudly ... for him, that meant no sleep ... for me, that meant I dreamed I was drowning night after night, and frequently woke up in a panic, absolutely gasping for air.

    After about 10 nights of that, I gave it up and returned to Serevent ... and a couple nights later my snoring and drowning dreams subsided.
    My wife got thrush from the spray, but none of the rest of what you experienced. Still, she had no side effects from the diskus powder. I think the Serevent diskus works better, also. QVAR (beclomethasone dipropionate) is another inhaled corticosteroid that's effective, but is only available as a spray. I can't imagine why your Serevent prescription is for only once/day.

  22. #22
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    I ride where the thylacine roamed!
    My Bikes
    Lots
    Posts
    39,926
    Mentioned
    42 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
    My wife got thrush from the spray, but none of the rest of what you experienced. Still, she had no side effects from the diskus powder. I think the Serevent diskus works better, also. QVAR (beclomethasone dipropionate) is another inhaled corticosteroid that's effective, but is only available as a spray. I can't imagine why your Serevent prescription is for only once/day.
    If it had just been the thrush, sore throat and loss of voice, I think I might have persisted with it, but my allergist figures I'm allergic to some ingredient in the steroid inhalers. I gather that most people don't experience all the wheezing, difficulty breathing, and bleeding nose and gums, and generally feeling much worse than before using the steroid inhaler.

    Right now my Serevent is only for once/day because ... that's what my allergist has decided to do. It is my impression that no one is really taking any of this very seriously. Maybe because while I'm sitting there in the office I look the picture of health. From 3 GPs (in the past year, 1 GP left and was replaced by another, and then I moved and had to find someone convenient + the second GP was on the verge of leaving anyway too ... I'm not GP hopping), a cardiologist, a gastroenterologist, and an allergist I've got basically the same response ... Have you tried steroids? They didn't work for you? Do you have some sort of inhaler? Yes? Good. Use that if you happen to need it.

    This allergist has shown the most interest, so I'm working with that.

    I'd love to go for an exercising lung test so that someone "official" can actually see me go into distress.

  23. #23
    just another gosling Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Everett, WA
    My Bikes
    CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004
    Posts
    8,593
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Machka View Post
    If it had just been the thrush, sore throat and loss of voice, I think I might have persisted with it, but my allergist figures I'm allergic to some ingredient in the steroid inhalers. I gather that most people don't experience all the wheezing, difficulty breathing, and bleeding nose and gums, and generally feeling much worse than before using the steroid inhaler.

    Right now my Serevent is only for once/day because ... that's what my allergist has decided to do. It is my impression that no one is really taking any of this very seriously. Maybe because while I'm sitting there in the office I look the picture of health. From 3 GPs (in the past year, 1 GP left and was replaced by another, and then I moved and had to find someone convenient + the second GP was on the verge of leaving anyway too ... I'm not GP hopping), a cardiologist, a gastroenterologist, and an allergist I've got basically the same response ... Have you tried steroids? They didn't work for you? Do you have some sort of inhaler? Yes? Good. Use that if you happen to need it.

    This allergist has shown the most interest, so I'm working with that.

    I'd love to go for an exercising lung test so that someone "official" can actually see me go into distress.
    Yes, in our experience too the biggest hurdle is getting a doctor to take you seriously. We had our best luck with internists and pulmonologists. You're probably not allergic to all steroids. As soon as these chemicals hit your blood they're immediately metabolized into something else, which actually does the work. And they're all different chemicals. It might be something in the liquid spray that you're allergic to, and maybe that's why the diskus works better for us. It dispenses just the dry chemical powder, nothing else. In this new medical age, one rather has to take charge of their own medical treatment. The docs either don't have the time, or you're not dying right there in their office and there are other folks who are, so why don't you just toddle on home.

  24. #24
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    I ride where the thylacine roamed!
    My Bikes
    Lots
    Posts
    39,926
    Mentioned
    42 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Peak flow meter is showing me running approx. 3/4 of where I should be.

  25. #25
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Boulder, CO
    Posts
    7,500
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Machka, I don't have any sage advice (except, be persistent until you find the right doctor) - but, just want to say I'm so sorry you are experiencing all this! It must be so frustrating for you to have gone from riding serious distance events like PBP a few years ago to huffing and puffing just walking around. Such a bummer. I hope you find a doctor who can help you with a solution.
    ...

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •