Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 24 of 24
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Victoria, Australia
    My Bikes
    Cecil Walker-about 20years old
    Posts
    19
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Is it possible...

    A mate of mine has asked me to join him on a week long ride over about 600-700 kilometres. Is it possible for a beginner like myself to condition my body for 700k's spread over a week or would I be overtraining and stuff my knees? I have 12 weeks to be ready, or not, however the case may be. Any suggestions?

  2. #2
    Rubber Side Down soccerismylife's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    San Diego
    My Bikes
    2005 Felt B2 TT Bike, 2005 Trek 2100, 2001 Fuji Finest AL
    Posts
    244
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    It depends on how long you've been biking and how much training you've done. Even for a beginner, twelve weeks is enough to train for it. 700 k over a week would be 100 k a day. 100 k is about 62 miles, which is definitly a doable amount. Because you wouldn't be doing high intensity, high resistance training for this, it shouldn't hurt your knees.
    "Everybody wants to know what I'm on. What am I on? I'm on my bike, busting my ass, six hours a day. What are you on?"
    -Lance Armstrong

  3. #3
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    I ride where the thylacine roamed!
    My Bikes
    Lots
    Posts
    38,513
    Mentioned
    31 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    How much of a beginner are you? How much do you ride now? Do you do other exercise regularly?

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    344
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Do you have any problems with your knees already?

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    344
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you ride 80% of the days between now and go-time, and add 1 mile each day starting with 1 mile then you should be up to 67 or 68 miles per day.

  6. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Victoria, Australia
    My Bikes
    Cecil Walker-about 20years old
    Posts
    19
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks for the suggestions,
    to answers your questions; I am a beginner who only rides a few hours a week. I can easily ride for an hour and average about 25km/h spinning in an easy gear. Although, speed isn't a huge issue given that my ride partner on our trip will be riding a hybrid with panniers and I will only have a small backpack and be riding a Giant Tcr 2 composite- although to be fair he weights 50kilos and I weight 80. Will it matter if I do a lot of weight training and long endurance work concurrently, since as far as I understand it, is important to train with weights to address muscle imbalances and postural problems(weak inner range of glutes, weak core, hamstring and tibialis anterior weakness etc...) caused through cycling, even if it might not improve your cycling to a great extent. Also, is it worth taking something like echinacea on long trips to boost your immune system?

    Any thoughts appreciated!

  7. #7
    Around now and then DnvrFox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Around now and then
    Posts
    20,882
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Although I do a lot of weight training, and work specifically on my abs and lower back, I think right now what you need is lots of "seat time." Ride, ride and ride some more. Do hard rides, easy rides, long rides and short rides. Do intervals and hills.

    At age 58, I decided to take a similar trip (Ride the Rockies in Colorado) and at the end of March bought a mtn bike, rode it like crazy, and did the Ride the Rockies near the end of June. So, I had about 12 weeks to train, also. My longest recent ride prior to that had been 7 miles on a used 10 speed.

    While strengthening the lower back and abs is important, your very best training right now will be simply riding. Start slow and short and devise a schedule that fits you and your situation, building more miles and seat time in each week. BE SURE TO GIVE YOURSELF SOME REST DAYS, as they are equally important. You can easily get ready.

    Have a great time!
    DnvrFox - still bicycling, swimming, walking and weight lifting at 74yo is participating a bit in BFN 50+.

  8. #8
    Has opinion, will express
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    12,720
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    kalpa, forget the weight training. Ride the bike. Ride as often as you can. Build your leg strength and fitness by riding. And ride ride hills, too. And ride with the load you expect. Ride not with the aim of speed, but with the aim of stamina.

    I suspect the issues you are likely to face are comfort, rehydration and refuelling. Because you are reasonably new to biking, and you ride limited hours a week, you won't have the experience to identify the fluid and fuel intake problems that can arise. Your comfort problems will be concentrated in two areas -- your butt and your hands/wrists. Bike fit plays a big role in this. Did the LBS fit you to the bike when you bought it?

    Often the problems aren't evident on short rides, but getting up to 100km a day, they become quite serious. And get worse with each consecutive 100km day.

    I would also suggest you be careful in talking to your friend and identifying how fast they are compared with you. How brittle are you emotionally? Riding 100km a day is a pretty interesting task for an inexperienced rider. Are you going to get going next morning when you feel like death warmed up from the day before?

    Advice: Drink lots. Get into the habit of sipping every 10 minutes or so. You should be consuming 750ml to one litre an hour in warm weather; more in hot weather. Drink before you are thirsty. Refill your bottles at every opportunity (and bottles it is -- not just one -- TCRs do have two bidon cage mounts, don't they?).

    Likewise, eat before you are hungry. Carry high-energy food with you. Don't rely on stuff being available in the "next town".

    What clothing are you going to take? If touring from now onwards, you will need extra. Otherwise you have the potential of freezing your tits off.

    .... oops, just seen you're in Australia. Unless you're heading away from the coast, that means hills. Is your bike equipped with lower gears? Spin, spin, spin is the creed, and if you are facing hills, a Giant TCR doesn't sound like a wise choice. How many chainrings does it have? What's the biggest cog on the rear? What shoes do you intend to ride in? Can you walk uphill for long distances in them?

    Honestly, I would reconsider the bike (not only for your physical reasons, but for mechanical ones as well). Your friend has the right approach -- a hybrid with panniers. A backpack can become a real liability after 100km. A hybrid has a low granny gear -- great for hills.

    Sorry, I am being negative compared with most other posters. But someone has to be. Cycle-touring is a fantastic activity. I love it. But you have to have equipment that will help you achieve your dream of doing it now and into the future. In my opinion, a Giant TCR is not it if you are a beginner and planning on doing 700km in a week with a backpack.

  9. #9
    Around now and then DnvrFox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Around now and then
    Posts
    20,882
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Sorry, I am being negative compared with most other posters. But someone has to be.
    Rowan's calling in life?

    He will do fine. 100 km per day is really not a great big challenge!
    DnvrFox - still bicycling, swimming, walking and weight lifting at 74yo is participating a bit in BFN 50+.

  10. #10
    Has opinion, will express
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    12,720
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by DnvrFox
    Rowan's calling in life?

    He will do fine. 100 km per day is really not a great big challenge!
    Unless the best the person's ever done is 20km. It's all relative, and especially so when you're an admitted beginner with a TCR! I still maintain time weight lifting is better spent riding the bike, irrespective of what it is.

    And my calling in life? A career change to risk assessor? I could handle that.

    Hey Denver, I'll be in Colorado in September!!! Any chance of catching up? It'll be Boulder for the Last Chance 1200. Not sure of scheduling at this point as far as arrival, but I have to be at LAX on 18 Sept, to fly out, and the event finishes on 16 Sept so before would be better instead of later.

    (Sorry for the temporary thread hijack, kalpa).

  11. #11
    Around now and then DnvrFox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Around now and then
    Posts
    20,882
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Rowan
    Unless the best the person's ever done is 20km. It's all relative, and especially so when you're an admitted beginner with a TCR! I still maintain time weight lifting is better spent riding the bike, irrespective of what it is.

    And my calling in life? A career change to risk assessor? I could handle that.

    Hey Denver, I'll be in Colorado in September!!! Any chance of catching up? It'll be Boulder for the Last Chance 1200. Not sure of scheduling at this point as far as arrival, but I have to be at LAX on 18 Sept, to fly out, and the event finishes on 16 Sept so before would be better instead of later.

    (Sorry for the temporary thread hijack, kalpa).
    Looks good right now.

    http://www.rmccrides.com/lastchance.htm

    "Due to the nature of the event and the terrain, we are imposing a 30 rider limit to this year's Last Chance."

    I am IMPRESSED!!

    And please see my previous thoughts (quoted below) also on the weight lifting thing. Sadly, I agree with you.

    Although I do a lot of weight training, and work specifically on my abs and lower back, I think right now what you need is lots of "seat time." Ride, ride and ride some more. Do hard rides, easy rides, long rides and short rides. Do intervals and hills.
    DnvrFox - still bicycling, swimming, walking and weight lifting at 74yo is participating a bit in BFN 50+.

  12. #12
    I ride my bike Revtor's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    412
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    yeah, youve got 3 months until the ride... This will be no problem. You just have to ride your bike alot before you go. Take three or four weeks or so the get in the groove of riding alot and then Id aim for one 80-100km day a week until you go. Try two 100km days in a row once to see how you fare. Dont forget a good pair (2 pairs actually) of riding shorts, you need that padding! Id recommend against wearing a backpack of any kind. It will make your back so hot and uncomfortable.. and the weight will just be hanging on your spine/wrists.. Get a rack and strap it on there. I would forget the weight training, any muscle imbalances caused by cycling shouldnt have hit you yet since you only ride a few hours a week.

    ride on!
    ~Stv

  13. #13
    So say we all.
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Austin, TX
    My Bikes
    Gary Fischer Wahoo, upgraded Specialized Allez
    Posts
    728
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'll be the odd man out here -- if you've got 3 months until the ride, don't drop the weight training. It'll be a shock to your body ("wait, I'm supposed to do WHAT now??") and I've never found weights to be an impediment to bike training over a long period of time. Drop the weights two weeks out, not 2 months out, and you'll get the full advantage of rested muscles and higher energy stores without losing the muscle tone you've worked hard for.

    Good luck!

  14. #14
    Around now and then DnvrFox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Around now and then
    Posts
    20,882
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by RedHairedScot
    I'll be the odd man out here -- if you've got 3 months until the ride, don't drop the weight training. It'll be a shock to your body ("wait, I'm supposed to do WHAT now??") and I've never found weights to be an impediment to bike training over a long period of time. Drop the weights two weeks out, not 2 months out, and you'll get the full advantage of rested muscles and higher energy stores without losing the muscle tone you've worked hard for.

    Good luck!
    Okay, I will agree that he should do enough weights so that he doesn't go backwards. But he said a "lot" of weight training.
    DnvrFox - still bicycling, swimming, walking and weight lifting at 74yo is participating a bit in BFN 50+.

  15. #15
    titanium
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by jakemoffatt
    If you ride 80% of the days between now and go-time, and add 1 mile each day starting with 1 mile then you should be up to 67 or 68 miles per day.
    i can tell you have never put any thought in to how to train lol
    Last edited by titanium; 04-13-05 at 03:02 PM.

  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    344
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by titanium
    i can tell you have never pot any thought in to how to train lol
    Yah I don't really have a clue I'm just putting out the facts... showing he has room to get to where he wants to be even if he starts from 0.

    12 weeks from now I think I could be up to that same distance without killing myself too badly.

    I'm picking up my first bike today, I'll let you all know how it goes twelve weeks from now, LOL.

  17. #17
    Senior Member late's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Southern Maine
    Posts
    8,257
    Mentioned
    18 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi,
    if you can, get one of those telephone coaches, like CTS.
    If you can't, add 10 miles a week. Every fourth week go long and easy. But ride less distance per ride; and ride easier than you did on week 3. What you can do is ride more often in this week.

    The next month you start over, adding ten miles a week, to each ride.
    It's a crude periodisation, but it should keep you from overtraing.
    The weight training is a tough call, I've never seen you train. I'd say for the first month it's not a big deal. But as you get closer to the event, you don't want it to interfere. So you'll have to taper.

  18. #18
    Huachuca Rider webist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    My Bikes
    Fuji CCR1, Specialized Roubaix
    Posts
    4,274
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by DnvrFox
    100 km per day is really not a great big challenge!
    Agreed. I did it for one day in a row once myself. I also rested agressively for a several days afterwards
    Just Peddlin' Around

  19. #19
    Has opinion, will express
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    12,720
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by webist
    Agreed. I did it for one day in a row once myself. I also rested agressively for a several days afterwards

  20. #20
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Victoria, Australia
    My Bikes
    Cecil Walker-about 20years old
    Posts
    19
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks for your advice, it seems well considered and backed by the experience that I do not yet have.
    I understand what your saying about the limitations of the TCR, but for me it is the right bike, since I didn't buy it with the intention of doing long rides but rather for local 50km group rides. I've been roped into the long rides so why turn down a great opportuntity to improve my base endurance and riding experience? I went for a 30k ride today with the mate who I'm doing the long ride with and it was piss easy- I have to go easy since his bike is heavier, although no doubt more comfortable: your right about the TCR not having a low enough first gear, I have to work hard on the hills. None the less, our trip is 3/4 flat with the occasional hills, and we will be travelling in the Australian winter. I am now planning to ride 5 times per week, something like this...1*long ride, 1*long recovery ride, 3*intermediate faster rides and stretching and a day at the pool to aid recovery, and I also do pilates twice a week (yes I know it sounds girly but it is extremely benefical) oh, and also eat and drink like a horse! I know I can mentally handle the trip, and if worst comes to worst we can always pull over and pitch the tent and rest, or even have rest day. The only thing I will need at the end of the trip is a 1 hour massage and a weeks rest

  21. #21
    Around now and then DnvrFox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Around now and then
    Posts
    20,882
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Go for it.

    10 years form now, you will ge so glad that you did.
    DnvrFox - still bicycling, swimming, walking and weight lifting at 74yo is participating a bit in BFN 50+.

  22. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    England
    Posts
    12,263
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You need to get lots of saddle time. Use the bike as much as possible; can you commute by bike? Get usd to cranking out longer milleage at the weekend.

    You need to find the most comfortable position and style for extended riding. Long distance riding is not like a morning jaunt, a small niggle can turn into a debilitating injury.
    Consider fitting a larger set of rear cogs to reduce your gearing, the widest tyres that your bike can fit (25mm kevlar banded?)
    and possible a small aerobar set for comfort rather than aerodynamics.
    Ditch the backpack and use rear rack + small paniers.

  23. #23
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Geneva, IL
    My Bikes
    Lemond Tourmalet
    Posts
    99
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I had a similar experience last year, I did a 600 mile tour in 6 days. Up til then, my longest ride was 140 miles, my second longest ride was 62 miles, and I rode two or three days a week and had been riding for a little over a year in a more serious manner. The trip was very hard, but I made it through. If speed isn't an issue, I would bet you could make the trip tomorrow, it might not be the easiest thing, but you would make it through. Just ride as much as you can, I think you will find that your legs and conditioning won't be the biggest pain, it will be your neck, shoulders and arms. Be sure to get a good bike fit and those problems will lessen some, but being on a bike for four or five hours wears on you after a couple days. Good luck, it will be something you will remember forever.
    www.team242.com
    307 miles long. 118 miles wide. 925 feet deep. It is Lake Michigan.
    We are riding around it for those who can't ride for themselves.

  24. #24
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Victoria, Australia
    My Bikes
    Cecil Walker-about 20years old
    Posts
    19
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks again for everyone's suggestions, it will definitely be a challenge but I'm very excited at the opportunity to prove to myself that I can follow my training and complete the trip. I've already started to play around with seat height, and riding positions and I will see if the guys at the bike shop can move the stem up on my bike- my neck gets sore from craneing- and I will try to ride in a more upright position. I think I will want to trade my new TCR C2 in and get a hybrid after this trip but then again I love how it handles and how fast you can go on it.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •