Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Triathlon Swim / Bike / Run your thing? Drop in our new triathlon forum for the latest in training & gear. From beginner to expert, and sprint to ironman.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 11-22-05, 03:09 PM   #1
tekhna
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 2,407
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Making a lower-end road bike servicable for a triathalon

So I am looking at making my Specialized Allez useable for a triathalon (wrong geometry I know) but nonetheless it seems like a few basics might help, given my budget. Aerobars seem like the first step, perhaps lighter more aero wheels. Beyond that is it worth putting much more into making a road bike useable as a triathalon bike? Doesn't really seem like it.
tekhna is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-05, 03:17 PM   #2
Sprocket Man
Prefers Aluminum
 
Sprocket Man's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Honolulu
Bikes: Wife: Trek 5200, C'dale Rush Feminine, Vitus 979 Me: Felt S25, Cervelo Soloist, C'dale Killer V500, Miyata Pro (fixie)
Posts: 2,671
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Also, you may want to set aside some funds for a new stem as aerobars will change your position significantly. And to compensate for a slacker geometry, Profile makes a seatpost that will position your body further forward.
Sprocket Man is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-05, 04:18 PM   #3
merlinextraligh
pan y agua
 
merlinextraligh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Jacksonville
Bikes: Wilier Zero 7; Merlin Extralight; Co-Motion Robusta; Schwinn Paramount; Motobecane Phantom Cross; Cervelo P2; Motebecane Ti Fly 29er; Calfee Dragonfly Tandem
Posts: 29,108
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by tekhna
perhaps lighter more aero wheels. .

More aero wheels, not necessarily lighter wheels.

In terms of budget priorities 1) aero bars, , 2) forward seat post, 3) triathlon specific seat, (the padding in the nose definitely makes it a lot more comofrtable in the aero position), 4) aero wheels.

The rider is by far the biggest source of drag, so your principal focus should be upon dialing in your position. The wheels will not make nearly as big of difference as your position.
merlinextraligh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-05, 04:45 PM   #4
Enthalpic
Killing Rabbits
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 5,122
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Clip-on aerobars are not very useful on the hills (up or down) but sure help on the flats. If the course is very hilly; forget them and save the weight.

What distance are you doing? Power generation is more important in shorter events and that might lean you towards somewhat more standard geometry.
Enthalpic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-05, 06:53 PM   #5
tekhna
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 2,407
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Enthalpic
Clip-on aerobars are not very useful on the hills (up or down) but sure help on the flats. If the course is very hilly; forget them and save the weight.

What distance are you doing? Power generation is more important in shorter events and that might lean you towards somewhat more standard geometry.

It is a 25k bike portion. There will be some very significant hills, but there will also be plenty of flat.
tekhna is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-05, 07:10 PM   #6
Enthalpic
Killing Rabbits
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 5,122
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
At 25K with hills I would just say save your money; practice getting aero with just your drops. You could always put your forearms right down on the uprights if you want to be a bit more aero. Just lowering your upper body by bending your arms more makes you aero but of course that gets uncomfortable in longer races, but your race is not too long.
Enthalpic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-05, 06:58 AM   #7
jennings780
Senior Member
 
jennings780's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: St. Louis, Missouri
Bikes: '06 Cannondale CAAD8, '04 Cannondale Ironman 2000
Posts: 422
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have profile design carbon strykes on my allez elite. I like them and think I pick up a bit of speed. I also like them for long rides when I am solo.
I'd say that aero bars are a worthwhile upgrade.
If you have $400 - $500 wheels would be nice too. WOn't be a night and day difference in speed but you'll like better ones. I think you can get Ksyrium Elites for about $450.
jennings780 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-05, 09:28 AM   #8
tekhna
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 2,407
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Well, I am thinking the Aerobars are a good addition for the reason jennings listed-I do a lot of solo riding in Indiana. Land of monster headwinds that whip across the open fields. There have been days that I have wished I had aerobars to cut the wind a bit. I am thinking of just going with clip on bars, not the whole base bar works. Any suggestions?
The Syntace C2s seem like a nice way to go.
tekhna is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-05, 01:20 PM   #9
LBonney
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 46
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Your bike is useable as is. What are you trying to get out of it vs. what you want to put into it is where the question lies.

I would add aerobars & nothing else. The forward seatposts don't fit some bikes, depending on how much post you have showing.

My vote for aerobars are Vision Tech. Very nice..... You could do a whole new front end, base bar, shifters,brakes, etc, but for 25 K A standard road bike will be just fine.
LBonney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-05, 01:22 PM   #10
LBonney
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 46
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Also - The real advantage to changing the bike geometry is in how your legs feel when its time to run.
LBonney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-05, 01:32 PM   #11
caloso
Packfodding 3
 
caloso's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Sacramento, California, USA
Bikes: Ridley Excalibur, Gazelle Champion Mondial, On-One Pompino, Specialized Rock Hopper
Posts: 33,593
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 46 Post(s)
It all depends on the geometry of your bike and finding a comfortable position there. I have a Trek 5200 with a fairly short top tube so I just add clip on aerobars (Syntace C2) and scoot up a bit on the saddle ("on the rivet").

On a course that's 25K and hilly, you may not even get much benefit from aerobars. Hope this is helpful.
caloso is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:23 PM.