Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Triathlon Swim / Bike / Run your thing? Drop in our new triathlon forum for the latest in training & gear. From beginner to expert, and sprint to ironman.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 01-05-06, 06:03 PM   #1
HiYoSilver
Rides again
Thread Starter
 
HiYoSilver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: W. Sacramento Region, aka, Nut Tree
Bikes: Giant OCR T, Trek SC
Posts: 3,259
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Uhh, real basic question

Some LBS guy is telling me that a tri bike is not a good buy because they can't handle curves and downhills.

Does this sound right to you all?
HiYoSilver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-06, 11:25 PM   #2
chrisesposito
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: North Bend, WA
Bikes: Cervelo Soloist / Cervelo P3
Posts: 480
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Broad sweeping generalizations like this one always set off alarms for me.
I've encountered downhills and downhill turns where I have briefly moved my hands from the aerobars to the brakes, but it's quite a stretch from this to an exaggeration like `can't handle downhills and turns.'
__________________
2007 QR Lucero
2005 Cervelo Soloist
chrisesposito is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-06, 02:04 AM   #3
Sprocket Man
Prefers Aluminum
 
Sprocket Man's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Honolulu
Bikes: Wife: Trek 5200, C'dale Rush Feminine, Vitus 979 Me: Felt S25, Cervelo Soloist, C'dale Killer V500, Miyata Pro (fixie)
Posts: 2,671
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Ask Michael Rasmussen - he'd probably agree. But seriously, I don't understand why a salesperson would tell you that. Like Chris said, it's a broad generalization that may or may not apply to a particular rider. If a tri-bike were being purchased for a novice rider to be used on a highly technical course, then perhaps it's not the best bike choice. But my tri-bike (as well as several that I've owned or used extensively) can handle curves and downhills just fine.
Sprocket Man is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-06, 02:07 AM   #4
cjbruin
Body by Guinness
 
cjbruin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Irvine, CA
Bikes: Specialized Allez Pro; Cervelo P2 SL; Tsunami (Converted to Fixed Gear)
Posts: 3,326
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I personally think that my Cervelo handles curves very well...almost as well as my roadie. With reference to downhills, I think that's pretty ridiculous. I've gone 45+ mph and felt rock solid.

I would say the biggest reason not to buy a tri bike is if you are planning to ride with people most of the time. The only time I ride my tri bike is when I am by myself because it can be unsafe to ride with others when you are in the aero position.
__________________
Fredo, you're my older brother and I love you...but don't ever take sides, with anyone, against the family again...ever.
cjbruin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-06, 06:38 AM   #5
HiYoSilver
Rides again
Thread Starter
 
HiYoSilver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: W. Sacramento Region, aka, Nut Tree
Bikes: Giant OCR T, Trek SC
Posts: 3,259
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thanks, that's what I thought. I'm not likely to do group rides, or at least close drafting rides.

I think the saleman was disturbed because I asked if there was such a thing as a tri bike with disc brakes. I don't know of any, so it looks like I'll have to give up on either disc brakes or a tri bike.
HiYoSilver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-06, 09:59 AM   #6
TriBob
Guest
 
Bikes:
Posts: n/a
Mentioned: Post(s)
Tagged: Thread(s)
Quoted: Post(s)
Years ago it might have been a little more true then it is today because of rule changes allows better geometry today. It is still a broad generalization as others have pointed out.

My 2005 tri bike takes turns and downhills great. I can take 90 degree turns at 30 mph and no problems holding a line doing 49 down the mountain at IMLP.
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-06, 10:08 AM   #7
timmhaan
more ape than man
 
timmhaan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: nyc
Bikes:
Posts: 8,093
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
i wonder if the salesperson was referring to using areo bars? even if he was, he should have explained it a lot better.
timmhaan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-06, 02:06 PM   #8
HiYoSilver
Rides again
Thread Starter
 
HiYoSilver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: W. Sacramento Region, aka, Nut Tree
Bikes: Giant OCR T, Trek SC
Posts: 3,259
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I presume so. All the bikes I mentioned were like the P3 or Blade which either have or accept something like the HED aerobar. I don't see how one unit aero bar or clamp on aero bar would make any difference. You're still sticking way out front.
HiYoSilver is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:29 AM.