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-   -   Post Your Tri Bike! (http://www.bikeforums.net/triathlon/207720-post-your-tri-bike.html)

joevella 08-21-06 09:26 PM

<quote> Which model Spinergy's? </quote>

identical to this guy - "old skewl" in this same thread ( http://www.secondhandsix.com/temp/ca...ra_tri_004.JPG)

Triguy 08-21-06 09:30 PM

Any model Spinergys versus 303 tubulars is about 1.5 pounds. Not to mention the use of STI shifters AND aerobars.

If you look at my build kit...Ritchey WCS stem is one of the lightest stems, Hed fliplites are the lightest aerobars, Selle Italia SLK is a light saddle, Zipp 303s are out of this world light, my new crank is another 100-150 grams lighter than most.

Don't sweat the weight. I do it for fun, it really does very little for speed and because when I spend my money I get something that stands out. Really, I'm trying to track down a disc(HINT HINT IF ANYONE HAS GOT A 650 shimano disc they want to get rid of CHEAP) right now and will gladly take the extra pound.

Upgrades have been put on hold for other much better invested dollars however...

Dalai 08-21-06 09:39 PM

Spinergy Rev X's are not the worlds lightest wheels. Claimed weights 700c Clincher was 1830g and tubular 1812g. Add tires, tubes etc it all adds up. Check out http://www.damonrinard.com/weights.htm#wheels

To be honest, unless your TT's / Tri's are very hilly or super technical courses, I wouldn't be too concerned.

PS. where are the pics? :)

joevella 08-21-06 10:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dalai
Spinergy Rev X's are not the worlds lightest wheels. Claimed weights 700c Clincher was 1830g and tubular 1812g. Add tires, tubes etc it all adds up. Check out http://www.damonrinard.com/weights.htm#wheels

To be honest, unless your TT's / Tri's are very hilly or super technical courses, I wouldn't be too concerned.

PS. where are the pics? :)

I'm waiting for the seat to come in - too embarassed with the seat from my hybrid on there - just couldnt keep looking at it instead of riding it. Hopefully i'll be able to get it from the LBS tomorrow night. He had it in last week, but hasn't unpacked his shipments.. that's another thread. Will definitely post the pics.

Thanks for the excellent weight resource - though I can't be too unhappy about the weight of the wheels, as there didn't seem to be much difference except for a few standouts. Lighter than the 3 spoke HED's for sure..

It's quite hilly around here ( hence the alpine gearing.. ). Once I make it past 18km, then I have some flat territory for another 30km. I've been out of the sport for 20 years, so I'm riding outbound like a TT and taking it easy going back. So far about 36km/h average outbound. Maybe I'll do the 50km this weekend - the flat section might pick up my average. In truth, I have been thrilled with the bike since I got it dialed in, until I weighed it the other day.

jrennie 08-22-06 10:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joevella
Can you guys put weights on with your pics? Thanks.

17.2 for the yellow kilo w/404's (comp and pedals, no bottle)

jrennie 08-22-06 10:22 AM

also check out http://weightweenies.starbike.com/ for weights on just about anything on a bike

strukljv 08-27-06 08:21 AM

My tri bike
 
http://home.comcast.net/~josephstrukl/CerveloHED3.JPG

MatL 08-29-06 08:45 AM

Here's my bike from the Clydesdale cheapo thread....

http://i92.photobucket.com/albums/l1...kRocket002.jpg

joevella 08-29-06 09:28 PM

Here's mine -
 
1 Attachment(s)
Not the final seat, but the Aspide hasn't come in yet..
ps: how do I get this bigger in the post? I don't see a control to size the image.
Attachment 23242

not2fast 08-30-06 12:50 PM

Matt,

that looks like a huge seat! Also, the seat post appears to be bent back slightly? Just an illusion, or is it in fact bent?

PS< Always nice to see tri-bars on a fat tire! I did a fat tire triathlon once, but the bike I borrowed didnt have tri bars.

MatL 08-30-06 09:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by not2fast
Matt,

that looks like a huge seat!


The seat IS huge... a side effect of being Clydesdale. I need a little more comfort and surface area to rest on when coasting down all the hills these tri bike courses seem to have. :p Some of the best speed I get is coasting down those suckers. Even make up ground on the folks with 'regular' road bikes.


Quote:

Originally Posted by not2fast

Also, the seat post appears to be bent back slightly? Just an illusion, or is it in fact bent?


That is NOT an illusion - there is a slight bend still. :rolleyes:






OK I'll explain....

For my 1st triathlon the quick release for the seatpost was just a little bit loose -- so by the end of the race, I was sitting 4 inches lower than I started the race. Didn't realize it until I looked at my pictures. My wife laughed at how funny I looked. Now I know why the bike took so much work by the end. :D

To fix that I started by tightening the quick release and adjusting the seat height closer to the max -- got aerobars as a present and needed to adjust seat height again after figuring out what felt OK when using the bars and when just biking..

For my 2nd race I had the seat at almost max height. When nearing the max seat height -- there is a cutout in the tube that my seatpost was barely below -- and I mean barely. During this race I must have exerted more effort than I realized - (or it's another side effect of being a clydesdale) - I stressed the top of the tube and creased the metal both sides of where the cutout was. The seat was angled *WAY* back by the end of the race. :eek: After the race I was unloading my bike and noticed it right away.

I had another race the next weekend. So looked to NASCAR for inspiration...bent the tubing back, hammered the seat post down a little further so more of the post was actually in the tube, retightened the clamp and called it 'good enough'. Not straight, but OK. Raced again the next weekend up in Nevis MN averaged 16.4 mph -- good pace for me. No change in tube angle yet.





Quote:

Originally Posted by not2fast
Always nice to see tri-bars on a fat tire! I did a fat tire triathlon once, but the bike I borrowed didnt have tri bars.

Aerobars on a fat tire MTB -- Yeah - my cheapo bike is starting to cause some head scratching lately. My tri buddies tell me that Tri bars really shouldn't be on a mountain bike - I keep hearing how 'its just wrong' and shouldn't be done. Violates the purpose of the MTB or something.


I got these the areobars as a father's day present. Some tri bars come with a set of adapters - my bars had adapters to fit 2 sizes of handlebars (road size 1 and road size 2) -- small MTB handlebars need not apply. Well, I coudn't let the little one down - not when her present was to help me with my "swim bike run" race. So with the supplied adapters, some (4) rubber spacers, and little time spent tinkering I got them to fit. Shhhhhh don't tell... that part is still a secret.

Thanks
Mat

jrennie 08-31-06 06:54 AM

if you can get a 16.4mph average on theat thing, do yourself a favor and go get a real tri bike or road bike at least. It need not be expensive(BD models that would work from $299 or even an old garage sale roddie that is in good shape) and get it fit properly and you'll be screaming. With out fat tires, upright riding position, and springy front fork working against you, your bike time will be much faster and alot more fun.

MatL 08-31-06 08:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jrennie
if you can get a 16.4mph average on theat thing, do yourself a favor and go get a real tri bike or road bike at least. It need not be expensive(BD models that would work from $299 or even an old garage sale roddie that is in good shape) and get it fit properly and you'll be screaming. With out fat tires, upright riding position, and springy front fork working against you, your bike time will be much faster and alot more fun.

I hear what you are saying - faster = more fun. I was very pleased with 16.4 - as I was only 10 seconds slower than my coworker who was riding an older tri bike. What is a BD model?

Also I have set a goal to 'treat myself' to something (probably used) once I drop 20 - 25 lbs. I figure my effort this winter will be better spent working on upgrading 'the engine' before upgrading 'the bike'. Plus with a little less of me stressing the frame, perhaps I won't bend the seatpost. Once I get a new bike, I can keep this bike around and find out what a 'fat tire' tri is -- (mentioned by not2fast) sounds interesting.

jrennie 08-31-06 09:20 AM

"Fat tire" is a mtn. bike. I am fully in support of upgrading the engine not just the bike but a triathlon(and bike aerodynamics) is all about conservation of energy and portioning it out over the course. The rolling resistance created by the "fat tires", upright riding position and strap pedals are robbing you of energy that could be used on the run or faster bike times.

MatL 08-31-06 10:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jrennie
"Fat tire" is a mtn. bike. I am fully in support of upgrading the engine not just the bike but a triathlon(and bike aerodynamics) is all about conservation of energy and portioning it out over the course. The rolling resistance created by the "fat tires", upright riding position and strap pedals are robbing you of energy that could be used on the run or faster bike times.


Makes sense - I did a quick google and found some off road tri's that use fat tire bikes.

What are the "BD models" that you mentioned? (you can PM me if you would like.)

fa63 08-31-06 01:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MatL
Makes sense - I did a quick google and found some off road tri's that use fat tire bikes.

What are the "BD models" that you mentioned? (you can PM me if you would like.)

BD is short for bikesdirect, which is an online company that sells generic road and tri bikes for cheap. Not a bad idea if you know what size bike you need, but otherwise as a first time buyer, it might be a better idea to get a proper fitting bike from a local bike store (LBS). Improperly fitting road bikes make it painful to ride, plus you can pretty much no support on your bike after you buy it online. Buying it from a LBS will mean that the bike is properly put together, will fit you well (well, as long as they don't have a bunch of monkeys working at the LBS :)), and you will likely get free tuneups for your bike too. Well worth the extra cost until you know what size frame you need, and learn how to put together and maintain a road bike.

Good luck.

Berns 08-31-06 03:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joevella
Not the final seat, but the Aspide hasn't come in yet..
ps: how do I get this bigger in the post? I don't see a control to size the image.
Attachment 23242


Nice bike! Brakes on the aerobars looks a little scary though... How do you like the Leader frame?

joevella 09-02-06 11:23 PM

Thanks - I like the STI on the aero bars - I feel much more confident being able to shift and brake without moving my hands from the aero position, where I do most of my riding - I have an auxiliary lever on the front brake so I can use it from the drops as well - this also increases the confidence factor. Lots of hills here, so constant shifting..
The leader frame is very nice. It has a smooth, secure ride, and the fit and finish were flawless - a little paint had to be removed from the headset seat, but that's all. It seems quite light for an aero aluminum frame - I didn't weigh it, except in my hand, but it felt like nothing. I hear it is less than 4 lb. Which might not make the weight weenies happy, but it made a great bike nonetheless.
One thing - I didn't get the horizontal dropouts ( I thought I was, but I didn't look at the picture close enough.. ) - I've been told however, that this one will ride/handle better, and I'm not disappointed so far - unless someone tells me that I should be..

I should note that the shifters are reversed, so that the rear derailleur shifts from my left hand -
for two reasons 1. this allows the shift cables to operate without interfering with each other as the
brakes are pulled, on the closely spaced aero bars and 2. I'm left handed :).
The brakes are arranged conventionally.

BTW - what does the Zipp Beam frame feel like to ride?

Quote:

Originally Posted by Berns
Nice bike! Brakes on the aerobars looks a little scary though... How do you like the Leader frame?


Berns 09-05-06 03:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joevella
BTW - what does the Zipp Beam frame feel like to ride?

The beam takes some getting used to. I like that it floats around a little both vertically and horizontally. I don't feel that there's too much of a power loss. The bottom bracket area moves around quite a-bit though. Especially under hard climbing and sprinting. Other than that, on long rides, it makes for a very comfortable ride. I'm very, very happy with the bike overall. That's not saying much though because my previous bikes were a late 80's Specialized Sirrus and Raleigh Marathon (26" front / 27" rear). What a difference!

NitE GameR 09-08-06 09:58 PM

1 Attachment(s)
This is my tri/road bike in progress. Nothing to special so far. Adding some Hed Alps or Hed 3 wheels soon hopefully. Recently had the stem flipped and new seat added (loving the SLK) Not to concerned about the bike though, I make up for it in the swim, being as I am one of those few triatheletes that is a better swimmer then anything else.

uclamutt 09-23-06 10:11 PM

Just got it.... Hope the pic works!!

http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l2...t/IMG_0735.jpg

rplong 09-24-06 06:55 AM

I like the paint mutt.

thomasp2000 09-24-06 01:21 PM

Selling??

huntjump 09-24-06 02:00 PM

Nice Bike Mutt :D

Barley 09-27-06 09:47 PM

http://home.comcast.net/~j.forst/DSC00713c.JPG


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