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  1. #1
    Carfree and Carefree
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    tri specific bike for commuting and training

    Im in the market for a new bike (current bike is a marin san rafael, its a hybrid/comfort bike) and I just wanted everyone's opinion on buying a tri specific bike for 1-2 oly distance triathlon's per year and the rest of my rides will be training solo and commuting. For some reason on my bike now I always feel like I would be more comfortable in the aero position, and the aggressive geometry appeals to me. How do tri bikes generally handle steep climbs and sharp turns? Am I crazy to not just buy a road bike? Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Duathlete indygreg's Avatar
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    Hard to say you are crazy, but most would recommend against that. Commuting would not be ideal on a tri bike . . . having to switch to grab brakes, etc. A tri/TT bike will not handle sharp turns as well as a road bike, etc. To me these things add up to a less safe commute. I ride a decent amount on my road bike and I feel so much less safe when on aero bars. Part of that is my inexperience, but part is just the fact you are not as able to steer or stop in that position.
    Of course you could do this and if this is what you want, do it.

    However, with only doing 1-2 tris a year, to me this is a no brainer 100% - get a road bike. Slap some aero bars on it when you race and when you want to ride low. A road bike will be better the 97% of the time you are not racing.

    Here is another part of it - you have a hybrid bike (and I am assuming you do not have a lot of road or tri bike experience) and it is somewhat normal to feel like an aggressive position feels good. It does in that you are low and it feels very powerful and efficient. However, it gets old quicker than you think. Just moving from your comfort to a road bike will have you in some pain after your first few rides (sore neck, hot spots, numb hands, etc - EVEN on a perfectly fitted bike). These go away as your body adapts. The tri/TT position is really a very aggressive position and will wear on you if that is all you do.
    Run, Bike, Run.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
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    You could always buy a tri bike for racing and keep your hybrid for commuting. If you are not too interested in that, and as indygreg said, if you aren't just racing a ton, a road bike will be better suited for the majority of your riding.

    You could always get a road bike now, use it for your commuting and racing and training. Then if you find yourself really getting into tris, buy a tri bike later and you'll still have a road bike for training and commuting.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
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    You could always get a tri-ish road bike, like a Kestrel Talon. Ride it road style and move the seat forward and slap on aerobars 2 times a year.

    -D

  5. #5
    Young and unconcerned Treefox's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by derath
    You could always get a tri-ish road bike, like a Kestrel Talon. Ride it road style and move the seat forward and slap on aerobars 2 times a year.

    -D
    +1

    Or really any road bike.
    Die schokoladenseite des radfahrens.

  6. #6
    Carfree and Carefree
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    thanks for the responses. You have convinced me to get a standard road bike. For a complete bike between 1000 and 2000 dollars, what are some options for a good all around road bike (weight, components, comfort, speed etc)? Thanks

  7. #7
    Machine
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    I'd recommend looking at the Felt lineup. They seem to have a good reputation all around and offer some models that are often written about as the best bang for the buck. My buddy has a Felt and absolutely loves it. I think Orbea has a few decent road bikes in the $1k-2k range. Let us know what you get, good luck!

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