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  1. #1
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    Swapping b/t road and aero cockpit

    So I'm set on getting a Cervelo Soloist Team. I like the "convertability" of its design among other things. When it comes to doing tri's I would like to have a dedicated aero set up in front with bar-end shifters, etc....and a dedicated roadie set up for group rides & climbs.
    How much is involved in swapping the bars, shifters, and brake cables? Seems a little tedious but with some practice it does not appear too difficult. My biggest question is on cable length. Will different (longer/shorter) cables have to be re-routed from the bars to the shifters and brakes for each swap?

    Someone here on the Forum has a Soloist Team they do this on...I forget who, but they have a nice set up in some posted pics. I'd like to hear all the in & outs of the job.
    I currently ride a road bike with clip-ons , but prefer the true aero option when needed.
    Fwiw, I'm pretty good with tools. Thanks.

  2. #2
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    Kinda had my own question answered by a quick search....duh.

    Anyway, I'd like to hear from someone that does this swap "routinely".

  3. #3
    Senior Member Snicklefritz's Avatar
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    dude, use this as an excuse to get another bike. The correct number of bikes to own is n+1, where n=the number you currently own.

    I thought about doing this, but ended up getting a great deal on the Fuji Aloha 1.0 and just got a new bike. I am so slow twitch that I may end up doing more TT/Du/Tri than crits/RR so I figured it was a good investment. Would you post the link though to whatever search you did? Even though I have a dedicated TT bike I am still curious how people do the swap.

  4. #4
    Body by Guinness cjbruin's Avatar
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    If you're a decent wrench it's probably not a big deal but it would be more time consuming than I would want to deal with as I would be switching far too often. A typical week for me has me riding my fixie a few times on weekday evenings, a Saturday group ride on my roadie, and 1-2 solo rides on my Tri bike. It's nice to be able to grab your bike and go without doing much but pumping up the tires.

    I think the Soloist is an awesome ride. I just couldn't see myself screwing around with cables every time I wanted to switch up for a specific ride. That's just me though...more power to ya
    Fredo, you're my older brother and I love you...but don't ever take sides, with anyone, against the family again...ever.

  5. #5
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    A neat way to manage the cables could be cable splitters like those used on S&S coupled or Ritchey Breakaway bikes...

    http://www.sandsmachine.com/ac_cable.htm

  6. #6
    driving sucks indianatrails's Avatar
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    I have a Soloist (& completely smitten) but haven't reached the limit where lack of bar-end shifters is slowing me down. Maybe won't get there anytime soon. Getting fitted for both setups would be the best mechanical "upgrade" you could make, and the Soloist (hence the name) is one of the few frames that can do both well.

    Beyond fit: aero bars (clip-on or not), TT helmet, skinsuit, and aero/disk wheels are likely the most effective upgrades for TT. So my RR-TT conversion consists of swapping the saddle/upper seatpost (TT seatpost is in reverse), adding clip-ons, changing wheelset, and some minor allen wrench tweaks. Takes about 15 minutes.
    Last edited by indianatrails; 07-05-07 at 08:51 AM.

  7. #7
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    Thanks for the responses. Someone asked for a link to the search I did. I searched "aerobars" here in the Tri Forum or in the Bike Mechanics Forum, don't remember exactly, but it's in here somewhere.

    Trust me I'd like to have two (n + 1) different dedicated bikes, and I would get a dedicated TT/Tri bike right now if I liked my current ride more, which is my first road bike I've had for 1.5 yrs and has frankly gotten too soft and stretched out for my increasing abilities.

    Eventually, the Soloist will be my primary roadie, go anywhere, all condition ride. But, while I am getting into tri's I need...ok, 'want' both. I currently ride with clip-ons and really would like the convenience of bar end shifters, just don't like reaching down if I don't have to.

    To do it right, what is needed is two whole complete handlebar set ups each with brakes, shifters, and cables attached. I am intrigued by the S&S adapters for the shift cables, resetting brake cables is easy enough.
    I have a set of Race Lites and a set of 404's and will be getting an extra seat post for a quick reverse seat swap. Also, I wouldn't be doing this conversion every week, so I have plenty of time to know what set up I need for an upcoming ride.....I'm in flat land country & kinda prefer not to be in a draft line these days anyway.

    Btw, I'm new here...nice forum. I'll let ya'll know how it goes.

  8. #8
    Member whiterock's Avatar
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    Here's the link to the thread I posted earlier:

    On the fence, please push....

    I don't switch it back and forth very often...it takes about an hour for everything....
    1. Take the bars and stem off (I use a 1cm longer stem in the tri setup...2 stems also means you don't have to adjust the bar angles)
    2. Place the other bars/stem on the bike
    3. Disconnect the front brake cable from the calipers, attach the brake cable from the other bars (and repeat one by one until all the cables are run)
    4. Replace saddle and seatpost head (I don't have to change the seatpost height). If you have another seatpost head, you don't have to adjust the saddle.
    5. Adjust brakes and shifting

    Note, I have a set of cables and housings attached to each set of bars. The cable/housing lengths are different, and it is much easier to do if you leave the cables/housings on the bars they go with. I don't clip the cables when removing, I just give the cable caps a little twist and they come right off so I don't lose cable length with each swap. It helps to have a set of cable/housing cutters just in case. Eventually, I'll have to replace the cables if the ends start to come unwound due to handling.

    Cable routing is very easy if you do it one by one (keep the cables from getting crossed).

    The most time consuming part is making sure the shifting and brakes are adjusted.

    I don't switch very often, maybe 2-3 times per year.

    Eventually, I may get a tri-bike because it would be more convenient and would probably handle a little better, but the current setup works fine for me now while I'm still new to tri's. When/If I decide to get a dedicated tri-bike, I can either get some $$ off by having the LBS remove the cockpit and wheels, or I can start from the frame up.

    I also figured that I have a hard enough time finding time to ride one bike, let alone two.

  9. #9
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    whiterock-

    Thanks for responding, you are the one I was talking about. Nice Cervelo. It was your pictures that finally convinced me that I want two different handlebar set ups for a Soloist.

    I will eventually get a Tri specific bike, but for now this will work, my only regret is my Soloist will be gray and not black. I figure as long as I keep collecting extra wheels, bars, seats, etc...I may only have to buy a tri frame and build it myself. Out of curiosity what size is your frame?
    I'm a little further south in the humid end of the state. Thanks again.

  10. #10
    Member whiterock's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skniper
    Out of curiosity what size is your frame?
    I'm a little further south in the humid end of the state. Thanks again.
    Thanks. Its a 51cm and I'm 5'7". I grew up in the humid end (Galveston, Houston), although Dallas has been a washout lately.

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