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Old 07-11-07, 08:49 PM   #1
CCFISH81
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Converting a Road Bike

I have this old 2001 Cannondale road bike hanging around. Its an R-500 that is too small for me as a road bike, I ride a 54-55, the C-dale is a 50. The thought crossed my mind tonight about adding some Tri-Bars, and having a bike that might actually get used as a TT machine or for that 1-2 sprint tri's I do a year.

Is there an easy and affordable set of bars and shifters I can just plug and play onto this thing? It has the typical Sora/Tiagra set-up.

For those of you who are about to suggest clip-ons... don't bother, my mind is made up to either not ride this thing or have the fully integrated Tri Bars with bar end shifters ect.

So other than clip ons, any suggestions, comments, price issues? Please provide your collective Bike Forum Knowledge, as I typically stay over in the road bike area.
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Old 07-11-07, 10:57 PM   #2
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Don't dismiss the clip ons. As using clip ons with an aero base bar and stem offers far more adjustability when setting up and finding a good position.

Having integrated bars means you only can adjust the drop, nothing else...

Bar end shifters will be Dura ace as Shimano only make the one.

Brake levers can be any of a number of available brands from Dia compe to the Vision Tech 'blades'. Really comes down to budget.
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Old 07-11-07, 11:45 PM   #3
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Most of the members of my training team have clip-ons - and we're a pretty hard-core tri group, (with the possible exception of myself!) often with multiple training sessions a day, 7 days a week.


I personally use the Profile Jammer GT - cheap, relatively light and can handle both major handlebar sizes.

bikesportmichigan.com has some good articles on real aerobars.
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Old 07-12-07, 07:10 AM   #4
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I'm not dismissing Clip-ons. If I am going to use clip ons I would put them on my Giant TCR1 when the situation calls for it. Just trying to find information about how easy/hard this is to change.
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Old 07-12-07, 09:37 AM   #5
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Hey there,

I ride a size 54-55 too but my actual bike now is a 52 I bought used. I put Vision Tech TT clip-ons onto my Ritchey OS drop bars to make the bike more of a tri set up. Have a Profile Airwing base bars I will be installing on sometime year end.

Regarding an integrated set of tri-bars, I was eyeing a PZ Racing one on Ebay. If you are not too particular about weight and are budget conscious, you might want to consider this. I think you can get them new for about $80 USD.
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Old 07-12-07, 09:40 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cordia75
Regarding an integrated set of tri-bars, I was eyeing a PZ Racing one on Ebay. If you are not too particular about weight and are budget conscious, you might want to consider this. I think you can get them new for about $80 USD.
Something like this would be perfect. How easy is it to do? Would I need new brake and shift cables?
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Old 07-12-07, 11:58 AM   #7
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I have a 98 Cannondale Road bike that I just converted to tri bars this summer. The bullhorn and aero bars are Profile Design and the new stem is FSA. I had to upgrade and change to a threadless stem. I took all this to the local LBS and they changed all cables and intalled it for $50. I have had no problems with this set-up.
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Old 07-12-07, 12:36 PM   #8
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In this situation, where the bike is too short, regular tri-bars may actually be superior to jammer style ones, since you would actually want the length as opposed to a fitted road bike where the length would be too long. Something to keep in mind.
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Old 07-12-07, 02:09 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by akatsuki
In this situation, where the bike is too short, regular tri-bars may actually be superior to jammer style ones, since you would actually want the length as opposed to a fitted road bike where the length would be too long. Something to keep in mind.
Could you expand on this? Thanks...
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Old 07-12-07, 05:15 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CCFISH81
Could you expand on this? Thanks...
Jammer style clip-ons are meant for road bikes with drop bars. The basic idea is that they give you the same torso position as riding in the drops, but just move the arms inward for better aerodynamics. For this reason, they are shorter than tri-bike clip-ons. Ride in the drops on your road bike - ride one-handed and put the other arm up in the "aero" position and you'll see why the jammers are short.

But with a bike that's too small (at least as a road bike), you will be in a very low position (and probably too low for drop bars which is why TT and tri-bikes come with pursuit bars). You'll likely have to move the saddle forward, too, to maintain a roughly 90 degree hip angle since when the hip angle is closed to less than 90 degrees, most people start to have difficultly generating the same power output. With the saddle moved forward, you will want a longer aerobar.
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Old 07-13-07, 01:00 AM   #11
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anyone has pics to illustrate the differences between a jammer-type clip-on and a tribike clip-on? I'm still a little bleary.
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Old 07-13-07, 01:02 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CCFISH81
Something like this would be perfect. How easy is it to do? Would I need new brake and shift cables?
Unless you continue to mount your STI brifters on your basebar, yes you need to change them.

On my next changeover, I am looking to keep my brifters on my bullhorns instead of having aero brakes and aerobar shifters.
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Old 07-13-07, 12:13 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cordia75
anyone has pics to illustrate the differences between a jammer-type clip-on and a tribike clip-on? I'm still a little bleary.
Here are some pics of the Profile Jammer GTs and the Profile Split Seconds. The images aren't the same scale. I would guess that the pads for both are about the same size meaning the Split Seconds are even "more longer" than the Jammers.
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File Type: jpg PFJGT_L.jpg (5.1 KB, 8 views)
File Type: jpg PFSSA_L.jpg (3.8 KB, 10 views)
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